wireless - Archive

HLAA – WEBINAR: MFi (Made for iPhone) and Telecoil Technology-Wed Jan 21st

January 19, 2015 in Community Events, Technology

HLAA

 

 

 

 

 

photo of presenter
Guest Speaker: Juliëtte Sterkens, Au.D.
Date: Wednesday, January 21, 2015
Time: 8 p.m. – 9 p.m. Eastern Time

Join us this Wednesday for a free captioned webinar featuring Juliëtte Sterkens, Au.D., who will be presenting MFi (Made for iPhone) and Telecoil Technology: A Winning Team.

Juliëtte Sterkens, Au.D. took a leave from her audiology practice to take on the position of Hearing Loop Advocate for HLAA, traveling across the country to meet with HLAA Chapters and audiologists about the importance of telecoils and how to get a hearing loop project started in their community.

Summary
Please join HLAA Hearing Loop Advocate Juliëtte Sterkens, Au.D. for an informative session on Made For iPhone (MFi), Bluetooth and Telecoil Wireless Technology. Learn where and when each technology can help you hear with hearing devices you already own. Looking to replace your instruments in the near future? Attend this webinar to learn what questions to ask of your hearing provider regarding wireless technology.

How to Join the Webinar
Go to the Webinar Schedule page and click on the Join Webinar button.

Java is no longer a requirement to access our webinar platform, Blackboard Collaborate, but there is a series of steps required for first time attendees; we recommend spending a few minutes well in advance of the webinar making sure you are able to access Collaborate. Should you have any questions, please contact Nancy Macklin, HLAA Director of Events, at nmacklin@hearingloss.org or 301.657.2248 Ext. 106.

Hearing Loss Association of America 7910 Woodmont Ave, Suite 1200 Bethesda, MD 20814
Phone: 301-657-2248  |  Fax: 301-913-9413  |  Email: inquiry@hearingloss.org  |  Join HLAA

Wireless and Pacemakers: A Need for Caution

September 19, 2014 in Technology

 

 

Hearing Health
By 

Let me start by saying that my writing is evolving and becoming more polished, but, I am NOT a technical writer by any means. So, if any of you readers want to add technical information in the comment section, I am all for it! That being said, here we go!

As the world of fitting hearing aids moves toward completely wireless, I wonder how many of us have notes in charts, on programmers, etc., telling us not to use wireless programing and streamers around the necks of patients with pacemakers. A few years ago when streamers and wireless programmers were first coming onto the market we all wondered, how does the signal work?

Yes, it is Bluetooth, but that is only part of the equation with many of the manufacturers. HIMSA reported that the Noah Link had a 15-mm safety margin. A cell phone test conducted at the University of Oklahoma found the emission from the NOAH Link well within the required 6-inch (15 cm) area and less than most cell phones. The NOAH link uses 2400 MHz.

Read More  . . . 

Sonova’s microphone disguised as a pen offers “super normal hearing”

September 4, 2014 in Technology

 

 

REUTERS
BY CAROLINE COPLEY
ZURICH, Sept 3
Source Article

(Reuters) – A wireless microphone in the shape of a pen, made by Switzerland’s Sonova, can help people with  understand speech better than those with normal hearing at certain noise levels, a study has shown.

As the population ages, the hearing aid industry has become fiercely competitive as manufacturers rush to launch devices packed with newer technologies that will increase the appeal of wearing one.

Sonova is banking on new products to maintain its lead as the world’s biggest hearing aid maker. Around 70 percent of its hearing aid revenue comes from products that have been on the market for less than two years.

The company’s microphone, called “Roger” after the term used in radio communications to say a message has been received, wirelessly transmits a speaker’s voice over a 2.4 gigahertz (GHz) frequency to a tiny receiver that clips onto the aid.

Read more  . . .

FCC Public Notice – Volume Control on Wireline Phones

July 30, 2013 in Community News, Technology

FCC Issues Public Notice: Regarding Volume Control on Wireline Phones

On July 19, 2013, the FCC’s Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau released a Public Notice seeking comments on a petition for rulemaking filed by the Telecommunications Industry Association (TIA).  TIA requested the Commission to update its technical standard for volume control on wireline phones to allow people with hearing disabilities to achieve a more consistent experience when using amplification on these phones.
Comment Date:  August 19, 2013
Reply Comment Date:  September 19, 2013
Links to the Public Notice:
Word: http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DA-13-1601A1.doc
PDF:  http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DA-13-1601A1.pdf

For additional information, please contact Elaine Gardner, Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau, Disability Rights Office, (202) 418-0581, or email at Elaine.Gardner@fcc.gov.


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. You do not need permission to share this information, but please be sure to credit NVRC.  This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

Help Research by Taking a Survey on Emergency Communications

February 12, 2013 in Community News, Emergency Preparedness, Technology

Help Research by Taking a Survey on Emergency Communications

The Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center for Wireless Technologies (Wireless RERC) is asking for individuals to take its new online survey on emergency communications. The survey questions address emergency services, public alerts and warnings, and social media use during emergencies.

The Wireless RERC conducted this survey once before, almost two years ago. Because technology is changing so rapidly and new government rules are being implemented, RERC think it’s the right time to conduct the survey again. The data will be of great interest to regulatory authorities and other professionals working to improve emergency response and disaster relief for people with disabilities.

New to this version of the survey is the inclusion of a question for the respondent to identify if he/she is a caregiver. In this way, the RERC hopes to collect data on the caregiver experience as it relates to emergency communications technologies and behaviors, as well as the experiences of individuals with disabilities.

Take the Survey on Emergency Communications and People with Disabilities

Wireless RERC announcement regarding the 2012 Survey on Emergency Communications and People with Disabilities

More about the Wireless RERC:

The Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center for Wireless Technologies (Wireless RERC) is funded by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR) of the U.S. Department of Education. Their mission is to research, evaluate and develop innovative wireless technologies and products that meet the needs, enhance independence, and improve quality of life and community participation of people with disabilities.


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

How to Safeguard Yourself Against Wireless Device Theft

November 21, 2012 in Community News, Technology

From the Federal Communications Commission (FCC)

Background

The theft of wireless devices, particularly smartphones, is sharply on the rise across the country, according to many published reports. The high resale value of these high-tech phones has made them a prime target for robbers and the personal information contained on the device that could be used by identity thieves. Below are several steps that you can take to better protect yourself, your device, and the data it contains, along with instructions on what to do if your device is lost or stolen.   Read more . . . →