Usher Syndrome Type III - Archive

Going Blind and Deaf, One Woman Turns to Spinning

September 17, 2014 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

SHAPE – MIND AND BODY
Sep 15, 2014
By Locke Hughes

Faced with what Rebecca Alexander has gone through, most people couldn’t be blamed for giving up on exercise. At age 12, Alexander found out she was going blind due to a rare genetic disorder. Then, at 18, she suffered a fall from a second-story window, and her formerly athletic body was confined to a wheelchair for five months. Soon after that, she learned she was losing her hearing as well.

But Alexander hasn’t let these obstacles slow her down: At 35, she’s a psychotherapist with two masters degrees, a spin instructor, and an endurance racer living in New York City. In her new book, Not Fade Away: a Memoir of Senses Lost and Found, Rebecca writes about handling her disability with courage and positivity. Here, she tells us more about how fitness helps her cope with her day-to-day reality and the important lessons that anyone can take away from her experiences.

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