Uber - Archive

Uber aims to put more deaf drivers on the roads

April 26, 2016 in Community News, Transportation

 

“Uber teaming with a nonprofit group for the deaf to attract more hearing-impaired drivers”

Washington Post

April 19

Wendell Pratt can’t hear what his Uber passengers say about him, but he is used to reading their reactions when they learn he is deaf.

Some stare at him through his rearview mirror; others check their phones to make sure they have the correct driver, or pull up their own set of directions to follow. And one man who climbed into Pratt’s 2012 Toyota Prius a few months ago couldn’t hide what Pratt took as apprehension.

“He kept looking at me,” said Pratt, 45, of Frederick, Md. “He was very short and standoffish. It was his attitude I could see.”

Read more  . . . UBER

Uber Just Made It Easy To Be A Deaf Driver In India

February 11, 2016 in Community News, Transportation

 


By Adrija Bose
Posted: 

When Salman, an Uber driver in Mumbai, could not take calls from passengers, customers would cancel his ride. He would also have to text every rider to let them know that he’s deaf, which caused delays when picking up his riders.

Uber just made life easier for him and several drivers across the world who are deaf or hard of hearing.

An update to the taxi-hailing app, which was launched in Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Washington, D.C., has now gone live in India.

While there has been no official announcement on this yet, Uber has confirmed this development in India.

So, how does the app work?

Uber adds feature to allow Kenyan deaf drivers earn income

July 27, 2015 in Technology

 

 

BUSINESS TECH
Written by 
CORRESPONDENT

Deaf and hard-of-hearing Kenyans are the first in Africa to benefit from a ground-breaking innovation that will help them earn an income as drivers. The development follows a collaboration between Uber, the innovative smartphone app that seamlessly connects riders to drivers, and the Kenya National Association of the Deaf (KNAD).

Jambu Palaniappan, Regional General Manager for Eastern Europe, Middle East & Africa, says the Association has helped Uber understand the challenges deaf and hard-of-hearing people overcome every day.

“As a result we’re introducing new features on the Uber app which are designed to make it easier for deaf and hard-of-hearing Kenyans to become partner-drivers and earn an income. The new settings we’re announcing today are a first step but we’re already thinking about how else we can help, through education and awareness, remove the barrier between deaf and hearing people in our cities,” says Palaniappan

Read more . . .  Deaf Kenyan

Uber Adds New Features To Driver-Side App For Hearing Impaired Drivers

June 3, 2015 in Hearing Loss & Deafness, Technology

 

 


by 

Uber is making changes to its driver-side app to provide better functionality for deaf and hard of hearing driver partners.

For years now, Uber’s driver-side app has used audio alerts to notify the driver when a passenger is waiting to be picked up. This put Uber’s deaf and hard of hearing drivers in the position of having to text their intended passenger to let them know that all communication would need to be text-based.

Today, however, the company is rolling out an update to the app that uses a visual alert (flashing lights) to notify drivers of the waiting passenger. The feature is opt-in, so hearing drivers can stick with the audio alert if they prefer.

The update also changes some of the functionality for passengers being picked up by deaf or hard-of-hearing drivers, removing the option to call your driver and prompting the user to input their final destination before the car arrives.

Read more  . . . driver-side app

Meet One of New York City’s First Deaf Uber Drivers

February 5, 2015 in Community News

 

Pin Lu Was an Accountant Before Ferrying Passengers; ‘Deaf People Are Good Drivers Because They Focus and Pay Attention’

Wall Street Journal
By LILIT MARCUS
Feb. 1 , 2015

In many ways, Pin Lu is a typical UberX driver.

He uses his own car, complete with a crocheted owl dangling from the rearview mirror, to ferry passengers who hail him via the popular ride-sharing app.

He often works long hours, saving to start his own business someday.

And he takes pride in his user ratings, saying he has earned 4.82 out of a possible 5 stars.

But when New Yorkers step into Mr. Lu’s green 2011 Honda Accord, many are surprised to be handed a note asking them to type a destination into the GPS.

Mr. Lu, the note explains, is deaf.

“Let me know if you have a preferred route by using your hand motion as direction,” it reads. “If you have any questions, knock your hand to my shoulder. Write/type note to me as communication.”

Uber Technologies Inc. estimates it has about 40 deaf “driver-partners” across the U.S. and predicts that number is likely to grow as the company expands into new markets.

Mr. Lu, a spokeswoman said, is one of its first in the New York area.

Mr. Lu, 29 years old, was born without hearing in Fuzhou, China, and immigrated to Queens with his family when he was 10.

After earning an accounting degree from the National Technical Institute for the Deaf at the Rochester Institute of Technology in 2011, he spent about two years doing accounting work for the Defense Department in Rome, N.Y., but he grew tired of small-town life “in the middle of nowhere,” he says.

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