study - Archive

Workplace Accommodations: “Low Cost, High Impact”

September 27, 2016 in Advocacy & Access, Community News

 

 

The Job Accommodation Network (JAN) recently released the annual data for its ongoing study on the cost of workplace accommodations, revealing that the majority (59 percent) of workplace accommodations cost nothing, while for those that do, the typical small expenditure pays for itself multiple-fold in the form of reduced insurance and training costs and increased productivity and morale. JAN, which like EARN is a service of the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy, has reported the Workplace Accommodations: Low Cost, High Impact study each year since 2004.

Thanks to Access Fairfax: News and Events for People with Disabilities

RIT/NTID researchers receive $450K grant for longitudinal study of vision in deaf children

March 22, 2016 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness, Research

 

PUBLIC RELEASE: 

National Science Foundation grant will help scientists study how hearing levels and early-language experience influence deaf children’s vision

ROCHESTER INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

Does being born deaf lead to better visual skills, or does a lack of hearing make it difficult for deaf children to pay attention to the world around them? According to researchers at Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf, who recently earned a $450,000 National Science Foundation grant, the answer often depends on the background of the deaf child being studied.

The NSF award, which will be distributed over three years, will support a longitudinal study of 150 deaf children, ages 6 to 13, attending schools for the deaf around the United States. The research team, led by Matthew Dye, assistant professor in NTID’s Department of Liberal Studies, and Peter Hauser, professor and director of NTID’s Deaf Studies Laboratory, hopes to prove that deaf children who learn American Sign Language (ASL) early in life look at the world differently compared to deaf children who receive a cochlear implant and use a spoken language such as English. They also hope to learn whether it is a lack of hearing or the age at which they are exposed to a natural language that most influences how deaf children perceive the world.

Through assessments of each child’s hearing levels, cognitive skills and fluency in ASL, the scientists will determine how well these variables predict deaf children’s improvements in processing visual information. Research will also focus on how well deaf children can shift their focus of attention from one thing to another, or temporal visual attention. Using a set of iPad games, deaf children will be asked to look for targets in fast-moving streams of visual information or pick out important sequences.

“Many people think that being born deaf leads to deficits in the ability to understand information that is presented sequentially,” said Dye. “However, previous research has failed to dissociate loss of hearing from exposure to language. In this study, we want to see whether early exposure to ASL can enhance sequence processing in deaf students.”

Dye has said past studies have looked only at deaf children born to deaf parents, and who learned ASL when they were infants. Other studies have looked only at deaf children born to hearing parents, who do not learn ASL and use speech to communicate alongside digital hearing aids or cochlear implants.

“The visual attention system consists of different cognitive networks; language and hearing levels appear to have a positive effect on some, but not all, aspects of the network,” Hauser explained. “These findings have been based on comparing deaf individuals of different ages and backgrounds. With this grant funding, it is exciting that we now can follow the same deaf children over a period of time to observe how early language experience may lead to these changes.”

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Read original release . . . RIT/NTID

NIH Study – Nearly 1 in 7 Hispanic/Latino adults has some hearing loss

June 3, 2015 in Research

 

 

NIH-funded research points to factors related to environment, cultural subgroup, and certain medical conditions

Embargoed For Release: 
Thursday, May 28, 2015
11 a.m. (EDT)

Contact: 
NIDCD Press Office
(301) 496-7243
news@nidcd.nih.gov

Spanish version of this press release

In the largest study to date of hearing loss among Hispanic/Latino adults in the United States, researchers have found that nearly 1 in 7 has hearing loss, a number similar to the general population prevalence. The analysis also looked at the differences between subgroups and found that Hispanics of Puerto Rican descent have the highest rate of hearing loss, while Mexican-Americans have the lowest. The study identified several potential risk factors for hearing loss, including age, gender, education level, income, noise exposure, and diabetes. The study, which was supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Read more  . . . NIH STUDY

How does treating hearing loss help with stress?

April 3, 2015 in Community News, Research

 

 

Better Hearing Institute 

The intensive listening effort demanded by untreated hearing loss can be extremely stressful.

Experts believe that even if you have just a mild hearing loss that is not being treated, cognitive load increases significantly.

Research shows that when left unaddressed, hearing loss is frequently associated with other physical, mental, and emotional health issues that diminish quality of life.

Withdrawal from social situations, a lessened ability to cope, and reduced overall psychological health are just some of the conditions associated with unaddressed hearing loss. Often, people with untreated hearing loss feel angry, frustrated, anxious, isolated, and depressed.

A 2014 study, in fact, showed that hearing loss is associated with an increased risk of depression in adults of all ages, but is most pronounced in 18 to 69 year olds.  Another study, conducted in Italy, looked at working adults—35 to 55 years of age—with untreated mild to moderate age-related hearing loss and found that they were more prone to depression, anxiety, and interpersonal sensitivity than those with no hearing problems.

Read more  . . . hearing loss

CGF166 Gene Therapy Study for Severe Hearing Loss

December 12, 2014 in Research

 

Pioneers Recruitment Registry

Study objective: The goal of this study is to assess the safety and tolerability of an inner ear infusion of CGF166, a gene therapy. Another goal is to assess the effectiveness of CGF166 by measuring changes in hearing before and after treatment. Some of the possible benefits that researchers believe CGF166 may provide include improved hearing that may be revealed as improved speech recognition, and the ability to benefit from a hearing aid and avoid the need for a cochlear implant.

Am I eligible? Participants should be 21 to 70 years of age with severe hearing loss in both ears. You will be unable to participate if your hearing loss was caused by genetic/developmental disorders, surgery, or trauma. Also, participants will be excluded if they have cochlear implants, Meniere’s disease, or immunodeficiency diseases.

Read More  . . .

More about Pioneers Recruitment Registry
University of Kansas Medical Center (KUMC)

Related News Article:

Denver man gets gene therapy to restore hearing
by Jessica Oh, KUSA

http://www.9news.com/story/news/health/2014/11/29/hearing-loss-gene-therapy/19669727/

Are you interested in how the brain processes language?

September 12, 2014 in Research

 

 

Dr. Laura-Ann Petitto’s Brain and Language Laboratory for Neuroimaging (BL2) at Gallaudet University is currently recruiting candidates for our study. Right now we are studying how people with cochlear implants process language.
Participants will perform simple, language-related computer tasks, and will be compensated $20 per hour for their time. You may be a able to participate if you:
1) were born deaf,
2) are 18 years or older,
3) are right-handed,
4) received a cochlear implant at a young age (as a baby or child),
5) know ASL
If you are interested, please email us at bl2@gallaudet.edu
Click here for a brief video (ASL and English) explaining how to participate.  See our flier here.
Our study has been approved by the Gallaudet Institutional Review Board. 

Indiana University researchers study cognitive risks in children with cochlear implants

May 29, 2014 in Hearing Loss & Deafness, Research

 

 

IUSM Newsroom
May 22, 2014
Source: http://news.medicine.iu.edu/releases/2014/05/cochlear.shtml

INDIANAPOLIS — Children with profound deafness who receive a cochlear implant had as much as five times the risk of having delays in areas of working memory, controlled attention, planning and conceptual learning as children with normal hearing, according to Indiana University research published May 22 in the Journal of the American Medical Association Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery.

The authors evaluated 73 children implanted before age 7 and 78 children with normal hearing to determine the risk of deficits in executive functioning behaviors in everyday life.

Executive functioning, a set of mental processes involved in regulating and directing thinking and behavior, is important for focusing and attaining goals in daily life. All children in the study had average to above-average IQ scores. The results, reported in “Neurocognitive Risk in Children With Cochlear Implants,” are the first from a large-scale study to compare real-world executive functioning behavior in children with cochlear implants and those with normal hearing.

A cochlear implant device consists of an external component that processes sound into electrical signals that are sent to an internal receiver and electrodes that stimulate the auditory nerve. Although the device restores the ability to perceive many sounds to children who are born deaf, some details and nuances of hearing are lost in the process.

First author William Kronenberger, Ph.D., professor of clinical psychology in psychiatry at the IU School of Medicine and a specialist in neurocognitive and executive function testing, said that delays in executive functioning have been commonly reported by parents and others who work with children with cochlear implants. Based on these observations, his group sought to evaluate whether elevated risks of delays in executive functioning in children with cochlear implants exist, and what components of executive functioning were affected.

Read more  . . .

 

Research Study on Benefits of Post-Implantation Training

April 13, 2014 in Community News, Research

Invites Adult Cochlear Implant Users to Participate

*Washington DC/ Maryland/Virginia Residents Only*

What is the Study’s Purpose?
This study is looking at the effectiveness of training for adults who have received cochlear implants. We would like to determine whether a special training program can help cochlear implant users improve their understanding of speech and communication in daily life.

Who Can Participate?
Participants must be 18 years of age or older, post-lingually deafened (onset of hearing loss after having learned spoken language), fluent in English, and have had their cochlear implant between three months and three years.

Benefits?
Participating in this study may improve your communication ability, further knowledge in this area, and help determine the best training method for cochlear implant users.

When and Where?
Participation will require eight weekly visits (90 minutes each) scheduled at your convenience. There will be two follow-up visits; one at two months and one at six months following the last training session (also running 90 minutes each).

You will be able to participate at one of several Washington Metropolitan area locations including Gallaudet University and George Washington University in Washington, D.C., the Hearing Loss Association of America’s national office in Bethesda, Maryland, and the Hearing and Speech Agency in Baltimore, Maryland. 

Some of the training sessions are now available on site at the Northern Virginia Resource Center in Fairfax,Virginia 

To get more information on how to enroll in this study, please contact: Claire Bernstein, Ph.D,  Gallaudet University,at 202-448-7204, or send an email to: CITrainingStudy@hearingresearch.org

This study has been approved by the Institutional Review Boards at Gallaudet University and The George Washington University. Identifying information will be kept confidential.

Cochlear Implant Users Needed for Study at NVRC and HLAA

July 31, 2013 in Community News, Research

Cochlear Implant Users Needed to Participate in a Study of Video Telephone Services for Lipreading at the HLAA and NVRC 

Direct video telephone calls permit you to see your calling partner while you are talking with them on the phone.

A study is being conducted by Gallaudet University to investigate the level of quality that will lead to effective use of video telephone services for lipreading by people with hearing loss.

Each test session lasts one hour.  Testing will take place from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on:

Wednesday, August 21 at NVRC, 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030, and Thursday, August 22 at HLAA, 7919 Woodmont Ave., Suite 1200, Bethesda, MD 20814.

Individuals who are interested in participating:

  1. Must be 18 years of age or older,
  2. must be a daily cochlear implant user,
  3. must be fluent in English,
  4. must use the telephone (rather than TTY, Video Relay Services or Text-Based IP Relay) regularly for most of their calls, and
  5. must have normal or near normal (20/30 corrected) vision and no eye disease. (If you use reading glasses, please bring them with you.)

You will be paid $20 for your participation.

Contact Paula Tucker at paula.tucker@gallaudet.edu if you would like to participate at either location.

This study has been approved by the Gallaudet University Institutional Review Board.


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. You do not need permission to share this information, but please be sure to credit NVRC.  This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

Study Links Cigarette Smoking While Pregnant to Hearing Loss in Adolescents

July 11, 2013 in Community News, Research

Study Links Cigarette Smoking While Pregnant to Hearing Loss in Adolescents

By Lindsay Friedman, USA TODAY 7/8/2013

A new study links cigarette smoking while pregnant to hearing loss in adolescents.

Story Highlights

  • Prenatal smoking has been linked to premature birth
  • Kids with exposure were about three times more likely to have mild hearing loss
  • Hearing loss can lead to cognitive and academic issues

Parents can add hearing loss to the list of bad things tobacco smoke can do to children.

Previously, prenatal smoking has been linked to negative consequences in children of all ages, including premature birth, low weight or underdevelopment and asthma. Now, a connection also has been made between smoking while pregnant and hearing loss in adolescents, according to a new study published in the journal JAMA Otolaryngology.

“Cigarette smoking is probably the worst man-made epidemic,” says Michael Weitzman, study author and a professor at the New York University School of Medicine.

In a group of 964 kids ranging in age from 12 to 15 from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey in 2005-2006, about 16% of parents confirmed prenatal smoke exposure. In most cases, kids with exposure were roughly three times more likely to have mild hearing loss. Kids without exposure also were found to hear better by three decibels in comparison with those who were exposed.

“Most of the mothers in this particular sample quit (smoking) in the first trimester,” says Anil Lalwani, study contributor and professor and vice chairman for research at Columbia University. “Even brief encounters (with tobacco smoke) have negative effects.”

Read more: http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/07/08/hearingloss/2480365/


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. You do not need permission to share this information, but please be sure to credit NVRC.  This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.