Stop - Archive

Stop Defiance, Disrespect & Yelling – Workshop Nov. 5th

October 24, 2014 in Community Events, Families

 

 

Stop Defiance, Disrespect & Yelling

with America’s Calm Coach Kirk Martin & his son, Casey

 

Kirk will demonstrate 10 ways to:
• Get your kids to listen the first time. • Stop defiance, disrespect and yelling.
• Stop whining, tantrums and sibling fights.
• Get kids off video games/screens without a fight.
• Create stress-free mornings, homework time and bedtime.

 

“Practical, life-changing and laugh-out-loud funny”

Wednesday, November 5
7:00pm – 9:00pm

(Interpreters will be provided for the Wednesday lecture.)

Thursday, November 6

 10:30am – 12:30pm

– Perfectfor parents with kids ages 2-22.
– Both workshops cover the same content.

 

Parkwood Baptist Church
8726 Braddock Rd.
Annandale, VA 22003

The workshops are graciously sponsored by the Parkwood Wee Center.

The events are free and opened to the community.

Watch the Video at www.CelebrateCalm.com

 

Contact Brett with any questions. 888.506.1871
Brett@CelebrateCalm.com

Download Celebrate Calm Flyer

 

Tulsa Police Work To Improve Communication With Deaf Community

October 16, 2014 in Community News

 

Oklahoma’s Own , NEWS ON 6
TESS MAUNE
Oct 14, 2014

TULSA, Oklahoma – A town hall meeting Tuesday night focused on taking the fear out of a scary situation. Neither police nor citizens know exactly what to expect when someone’s pulled over, but that anxiety is compounded when a driver is deaf or hard of hearing. The issue came into stark focus after a deaf man was shot and killed last month in Florida, when he didn’t respond to deputies telling him to drop his gun. While Florida may seem far from here, it hits close to home for the deaf and hard of hearing in Oklahoma. A traffic stop is a situation no one ever wants to be in, but it happens. A reenactment shows a traffic stop from an officer’s perspective, but also gives the driver’s point of view. In this case, the man behind to wheel is deaf. It’s a situation Papa Rodgers Cameron said he knows all-too-well. “I get stopped a lot. I travel an awful lot on a motorcycle,” he said. Cameron speaks well, but he can’t hear. “I’m very, very, difficult to communicate with,” he said. Communication was the focus of a town hall meeting for the deaf and hard of hearing Tuesday night; whether it’s during a traffic stop, fire or 911 call.

Not all deaf people speak or read lips, but almost all communicate with their hands.

Read more of this article  . . .

10/14/2014 Related Story: Traffic Stops For Hearing Impaired Drivers: Practical Tips For Public Safety