Sandy - Archive

Save The Date: Celebrate Communication – May 11 2013

March 1, 2013 in Community Events, Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness, NVRC, NVRC Announcements, NVRC Calendar

Celebrate Communication 2013

Saturday, May 11, 2013, 10 AM to 3 PM

George Mason University,
4373 Mason Pond Drive, Fairfax, VA

Informational Exhibits • Technology Demonstrations • Children’s Activities  • Local ResourcesFree Hearing Screenings • Crafts • Prizes and More!
Celebarate2013
Now in Our 11th Year  – Free Admission

info@nvrc.org  • 703-352-9055V  • 703-352-9056 TTY  •  www.nvrc.org

NVRC-blue-300x300 kihd_logo_standalone GMU Lions_International

Brought to you by: the Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), the Helen A. Kellar Institute for Human disAbilities (KIHD), Lions International and George Mason University. Publicity courtesy of Virginia Relay.

R.I. Disaster Recovery Centers Offer New Services

December 11, 2012 in Community News, Emergency Preparedness, Employment

From Jamestown Press, 12/6/2012

FEMA centers equipped for hearing impaired The Federal Emergency Management Agency and R.I. Department of Labor and Training have added new services to the disaster recovery centers to help Rhode Islanders affected by Hurricane Sandy. These include American Sign Language interpreters and specialists who can help with unemployment insurance.

Read more . . . →

New York City Lawsuit over Disaster Planning for Individuals with Disabilities

November 9, 2012 in Advocacy & Access, Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness

Suit May Go On in Disaster Plan for the Disabled

By Benjamin Weiser, 12/8/2012

A judge has agreed to allow a class-action lawsuit to proceed against New York City alleging a systemic failure in addressing the needs of the disabled population in planning for emergencies and disasters.

The lawsuit was filed last year after Tropical Storm Irene; the lawyers have contended that there were significant gaps in the city’s plans to accommodate people with disabilities at city shelters or to evacuate them from high rises, among other claims.   Read more . . . →

Important Communication Guidance in Aftermath of Hurricane Sandy

November 1, 2012 in Advocacy & Access, Community News

Disability Rights Office/CGB Offers Communication Guidance to Persons with Disabilities

In Aftermath of Hurricane Sandy

From FEMA’s Office of Disability Integration and Coordination, 10/31/2012 

Disability Rights Office/CGB Offers Communication Guidance to Persons with Disabilities in Aftermath of Hurricane Sandy

The Federal Communications Commission’s Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau offers the following information to individuals with disabilities seeking information and assistance during the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy:

Phone Calls

•  According to an October 30, 2012 FEMA news release, the President declared major disasters for New York and New Jersey, making disaster assistance available to those in the heaviest hit areas affected by the storm.  Individuals and business owners who sustained losses in the designated counties in New York and New Jersey can begin the disaster application process by registering online at www.DisasterAssistance.gov, by web enabled mobile device at m.fema.gov or by calling 1-800-621-FEMA (3362).  Disaster assistance applicants who have a hearing or speech disability and use TTYs should call 1-800-462-7585 directly.  If you do not use a TTY and are calling through any relay service or by voice, you can also access the following voice telephone number:  1-800-621-3362.  These toll-free telephone numbers (provided by FEMA) will operate from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. (local time) seven days a week until further notice.

• If you have a hearing or speech disability, you also can use telecommunications relay services to make calls for assistance.  In your local area, dial 711 to access these services by TTY or by voice.  Alternatively, you can access IP Relay, IP Captioned Telephone or video relay services on line.

•  If you are trying to send someone a text message and it is not going through, wait 10 seconds before redialing a call.  On many wireless handsets, to re-dial a number, you simply push “send” after you’ve ended a call to redial the previous number.  If you do this too quickly, the data from the handset to the cell sites do not have enough time to clear before you’ve resent the same data.  This contributes to a clogged network.

• If you do not have electric power in your home, consider using your vehicle to charge cell phones or listen to news alerts on the car radio.  But don’t try to reach your car if it is not safe to do so, and remain vigilant about carbon monoxide emissions from your car if it is a closed space, such as a garage.

Television, Radio and the Internet

• Tune-in to television, radio and the Internet (via your desktop or laptop computer, tablet or mobile phone) for important news alerts.

• FCC rules require audio information about emergencies provided on television to be accompanied by visual information for persons with hearing disabilities.  This is typically provided through closed captions, so please make sure you have your captions turned on.

•  If you have a visual disability, emergency information provided during televised news programming must be provided in an audio format along with its visual format.  If you are watching regularly scheduled (non-news) programming and hear tones or beeps, this signifies that emergency information is being provided.  Turn on your radio or call someone to get up-to-date information about the emergency that is occurring.

• The Commission will continue to monitor closely complaints alleging violations of our laws requiring access to emergency information on television, and will review for possible enforcement action.  If you have a complaint regarding the lack of emergency information being presented in an accessible format, you may contact your video programming distributor directly for quick resolution of the problem (you can locate VPD contact information by searching the VPD Registry located on the FCC’s webpage at: http://esupport.fcc.gov/vpd-search/search.action) or you may file a complaint with the FCC.

If you decide to complain directly to the FCC, your complaint should include:

• The name of the VPD (e.g., broadcast station, cable company, satellite TV provider, local telephone company) against whom the complaint is alleged;

• The date and time of the transmission of emergency information that was in a format not accessible to persons with disabilities; and

• The type of emergency.

You can file your complaint with the FCC using the on-line complaint Form 2000C found athttp://www.fcc.gov/cgb/form2000c.html.  You also may contact the FCC by letter, facsimile transmission, telephone (voice/TRS/TTY), Internet e-mail, audio-cassette recording, Braille, or any other method that would best accommodate your disability.  Send your complaint to:

Federal Communications Commission

Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau

445 12th Street, SW

Washington, DC 20554

Phone: 1-888-225-5322 (voice); 1-888-835-5322 (TTY)

E-mail:  fccinfo@fcc.gov

Internet:  www.fcc.gov/cgb/complaints.html

Fax:  866-418-0232

Fact sheets summarizing the closed captioning and access to emergency information rules are available at the FCC’s Web site at http://www.fcc.gov/cgb/consumerfacts/closedcaption.html, and http://www.fcc.gov/cgb/consumerfacts/emergencyvideo.html.

Find more information at www.ready.gov,  http://www.redcross.org,  or www.fema.gov.


Distributed 2012 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.


 

Mayor Bloomberg’s Sign Language Interpreter

November 1, 2012 in Community News, Interpreting & Transliterating

Mayor Bloomberg’s Sign Language Interpreter
Lydia Callis: 5 Things You Don’t Know

By Allison Takeda, US Magazine, 10/31/2012

In the wake of superstorm Sandy this week, several unlikely stars have stepped into the spotlight. Among them? Lydia Callis, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s awesomely animated sign language interpreter, whose expressive translations at recent press conferences have been compared to first-class performance art.

Here, Us Weekly uncovers five fun facts about the scene-stealing signer who, as New York Magazine wrote, has given people “a legitimate reason to smile” during these hard times.

1. She’s a relatively recent graduate. According to NPR, Callis, 30, trained at the Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf, where she got her interpreting degree in 2010. “Linda Siple, a professor in NTID’s [American Sign Language] and Interpreting Education program, recalls Callis as ‘highly motivated, gracious, and professional…She was very motivated with the deaf community here,'” Rochester spokesperson Greg Livadas said in an email to NPR.

2. She has personal ties to the deaf community. DNAinfo New York reports that Westchester resident Callis has been interpreting for her mom and three siblings — all of whom are deaf — since she was a child. She also works as an American Sign Language interpreter for schools, hospitals, and businesses.

Read more and see a photo: http://www.usmagazine.com/celebrity-news/news/mayor-bloombergs-sign-language-interpreter-lydia-callis-5-things-you-dont-know-20123110

 


Distributed 2012 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.


 

 

10 Ways to Get Ready for Hurricane

October 28, 2012 in Advocacy & Access, NVRC Announcements

(You can follow Fairfax County’s Emergency Blog at #ffxstorm )

National Weather Service rainfall potential of Hurricane Sandy for the next 1-5 days.

Hurricane Sandy continues to be a major threat to our area and could lead to substantial impacts in the next few days. Virginia has already declared a state of emergency in advance of the storm.

To put it simply: we need you to prepare.

The storm’s track is not yet certain, but the National Weather Service models this morning suggest a likely scenario of 4-6 inches of rain, tropical storm winds, downed trees/power lines and flooding for possibly multiple days. More details will become available later today and Saturday from the National Weather Service about timing and impact.

But right now, we have time to get ready.

What you need to know and do:
1.)    Supplies: Get your supplies – water, medicines, canned food, cash, pet food and more. View more suggestions for emergency supply kits. We strongly recommend that you be prepared with at least three days of supplies.

2.)    Gas: Fill your car’s gas tank. Gas stations will be in short supply in a power outage.

3.)    Generators: If you have a generator or plan to buy one, please be familiar with safety tips.

4.)    Food Safety:  Power outages and flooding may happen as a result of a tropical storm or hurricane, so have a plan for keeping food safe. Have a cooler on hand to keep food cold, and group food together in the freezer so it stays cold longer.

5.)    Outdoor Items: Plan to secure all outdoor furniture, decorations, garbage cans and anything else that is not tied down.

6.)    Trees: Remove dead limbs on trees that could fall on your property (home, car, land).

7.)    Leaves: Clear leaves from storm drains, gutters and other areas that, if clogged, could cause flooding.

8.)    Weather Forecasts: Pay close attention to weather forecasts for the latest storm track. We will provide guidance as needed. Purchase or charge up your weather radio. If you have a weather radio that uses SAME codes, Fairfax County’s SAME code is 051059.

9.)    Tech Ready: View our Digital Preparedness Kit, which is an important way to stay informed and connected before, during and after an emergency.

10.) Phone Numbers: Save important phone numbers to your phone or write them down, especially your power company. Always report a power outage.

Please share this information with your family, friends and co-workers so our whole community can be better prepared.


Distributed 2012 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

Governor McDonnell Declares State of Emergency in Preparation for Hurricane Sandy

October 26, 2012 in Community Events, NVRC Announcements

 Long Duration Storm Has Potential to Produce Extensive Power Outages; Significant Flooding –

Impact in Commonwealth to Begin Saturday Night, Possibly Continue Through Wednesday; Storm Will be Followed by Colder Temperatures

RICHMOND – Governor Bob McDonnell has declared a state of emergency in Virginia in preparation for Hurricane Sandy, which is anticipated to affect the Commonwealth over the weekend and early next week. There is some uncertainty with the storm’s final track, but all forecasts call for significant impacts to Virginia. Sandy will be transitioning to an extratropical storm as it reaches Virginia, leading to a broader wind field with a wider reach across the Commonwealth. In addition, current models predict a slower storm and therefore a longer duration event than usual.

Based on current forecasts, the eastern third of Virginia could experience tropical storm force winds for more than 48 hours, several inches of rain and coastal flooding. Even inland areas of Virginia could see strong winds and significant rainfall. There is a strong possibility of extensive power outages. Residents in the western and southwestern parts of the state could see some snowfall, and all areas of the Commonwealth will experience colder temperatures in the wake of Sandy, which, when coupled with anticipated power outages, could produce additional challenges for Virginians.

Speaking about the State of Emergency, Governor McDonnell noted, “We are issuing this state of emergency today as a precautionary measure in order to ensure that we are ready for any potential effects of Hurricane Sandy in the Commonwealth. Weather forecasters are predicting significant weather impacts across much of Virginia, and a long duration event. Due to the track of this storm, and the fact that it will be a hurricane transitioning into a more nor’easter like system, we could see severe weather lasting for 48 hours or more in the state. In that scenario, saturated soil coupled with high winds could lead to major tree damage and extensive power outages. Now is the time for all Virginians to prepare for those possible power outages and disruptions to public services. In addition, forecasters predict falling temperatures during and behind this system, and in areas that suffer power outages this will lead to new challenges in the days after the storm departs. Virginians should make sure their family members, friends and neighbors are prepared for this storm. I encourage all Virginians to gather batteries, blankets, water, canned goods, and other necessities prior to the anticipated onset of storm conditions late Saturday and early Sunday.”

Eastern Virginia residents who live in low-lying areas should be ready to evacuate ahead of the storm. Citizens should listen to local TV and radio stations for instructions, such as an evacuation order for specific areas, details about evacuation routes and locations of evacuation shelters. If an evacuation is ordered for your area, take your emergency supplies with you, including all medications. For a list of suggested emergency supplies you should collect for your family, visit:http://www.vaemergency.gov/readyvirginia/getakit.

At this time, the Commonwealth does not plan to reverse lanes on Interstate 64, however a final decision on this matter will be reached this evening. Residents should review the evacuation routes for their area to determine the best route for their families. In the event that a mandatory evacuation is necessary in specific areas, citizens will be provided further instructions through local and state authorities.

A state of emergency is declared under state law so that state resources can be made available. The governor’s emergency declaration ensures a fully coordinated state response to support local initial recovery efforts. A declaration also decreases time needed to get personnel, equipment and supplies on scene.

State agencies are preparing for Sandy in the following ways:

  • The Commonwealth has activated the Virginia Emergency Response Team.
  • The Virginia Emergency Operations Center is coordinating the state’s response with increased staffing available 24 hours a day.
  • Virginia State Police personnel have been placed on stand-by and will be pre-positioned to the areas where they will be needed based on the final projected path of the hurricane. The Virginia State Police Swift Water Rescue Team is standing by in strategic locations.
  • Chainsaw crews from the Virginia Department of Forestry are standing by with emergency response personnel and to help with debris removal.
  • Virginia Department of Transportation crews are ready to clear roads and ensure roads are safe for travel.
  • The Virginia National Guard has been authorized to bring personnel on state active duty and begin prepositioning resources.
  • The Virginia Department of Health is coordinating with hospitals and long-term care facilities to ensure that they are prepared for storm impacts.

Emergency preparedness is everyone’s responsibility. For information about preparing for Hurricane Sandy and for regular updates, visit http://www.vaemergency.gov/. For general information about the storm, dial 211.


Distributed 2012 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.