review - Archive

Washington Post Reviews – ‘EL DEAFO’ by deaf Va. artist CECE BELL

September 24, 2014 in Community News

 

 

Washington Post
Comic Riffs
By Michael Cavna September 23

‘EL DEAFO’: With her first (and so funny) graphic novel,
deaf Va. artist CECE BELL hopes her tale will help others

IT IS A STORY Cece Bell knew she wanted to tell, and believed it was something she should share. But it took decades of discovery and experience, and then artistic growth and parenthood, to get to a place where she was ready to put it to paper.

At age 4, Bell suffered a brief bout with meningitis that left her “severely to profoundly deaf.” Soon she was wearing hearing aids, and a large Phonic Ear across her chest. As her life, too, began to change profoundly, she created an alter-ego – El Deafo! – who, amid a child’s sense of vulnerability and uncertainty, was determined to feel empowered by her being “different.”

Now, at age 43, Bell has introduced her superheroic self to the world in her emotionally truthful graphic-novel debut — titled, naturally, “El Deafo”(Amulet). As memoir, it is a work that demanded its own journey.

“I think the story was easier to tell, since I knew the material inside and out, and I’ve pretty much spent my whole life trying to make sense of some of the things that happened to me,” Bell tells The Post’s Comic Riffs (ahead of her appearance Wednesday morning at Washington’s Politics & Prose bookstore, and tomorrow afternoon at One More Page Books in Arlington, Va.) . “But the [five-year] execution of the book was probably the hardest project I’ve ever taken on in my life.

“I’ve said it so many times my throat hurts: I don’t see how the graphic novelists in this world make more than one of these things in one lifetime!”

Bell was born in Richmond, and “El Deafo” recounts her childhood growing up near Roanoke. Her Virginia roots run through her work in many ways, including the very illustration itself. She created the inviting art of “El Deafo” with Eisner-winning colorist David Lasky, whom she and her husband met while attending the College of William & Mary.

Washington Post Article

No(ah), No(ah) – It’s Too Loud, By Gael Hannan

April 10, 2014 in Captioning / Relay, Hearing Loss & Deafness

By Gael Hannan, Hearing Health Matters 4/8/2014

In hindsight, we should have picked the movie about the spelling bee over the cute animals marching two by two into Russell Crowe’s ark.

noah

 

I mean, how loud can a spelling bee be, whereas Noah turned out to be a surprise candidate for the Loudest Movie I’ve Ever Seen award.  But who knew?  The


Spoiler Alert:  
Noah is too loud with non-stop visual effects.other choices for a movie night with the Hearing Husband and my hearing friend Wendy were action/thriller films that we figured would be too loud with non-stop and over-the-top visual effects.

While it’s not a religious movie, there are angels in the form of gigantic stone-lava transformers.  And there are hordes of screaming people who can’t swim and don’t have tickets for the ark.  When le déluge starts, the water comes not only from the sky, but from mighty geysers roaring up from the earth, hundreds of feet in the air, presumably as part of the Creator’s plan to get that boat afloat as quickly as possible.  And all of these noise sources happen at the same time, creating a mega-decibel cacophony that almost melted my hearing aids.

I wish I had been able to turn on the Decibel Meter app on my cellphone to measure the volume.  But I didn’t have any free fingers.  I had taken out one of my in-the-ear hearing aids because it was magnifying the already loud noise (when is compression supposed to kick in?) in a sensory onslaught that made my head vibrate and my eyeballs ache.

My other hand was helping to balance my popcorn and drink, because the drink holder contained my CaptiViewcaption thingy.  (I’ve complained about this before; if my caption device is in the drink holder, I have to hold the huge drink in my lap.  A shout out to movie chains – get the Sony Caption Glasses system.  It places the captions where you want them and leaves your hands free for food, drink and hearing aids.)  . . .

Read More . . . . 

http://hearinghealthmatters.org/betterhearingconsumer/2014/noah-noah-loud/

Joe Duarte Reviews the MED-EL Rondo

April 27, 2013 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness, Technology

Joe Duarte, President and Company Principal of Duartek, Inc., has written a review of his experience with the recently released MED-EL cochlear implant processor, the Rondo.

It can be found online at http://cochlearimplanthelp.com/2013/04/26/med-el-rondo-review/. The article also includes a video clip with captions.


© Copyright 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

Restaurant Survey Results

March 1, 2011 in Education & Outreach, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

We are excited to have so many participants sharing their experiences.  Because of the large amount of information, we have changed our format and put the results in a PDF spread sheet.