NY - Archive

Deaf students unveil signed video – Rochester, NY

June 2, 2016 in Community News

 

 

Democrat and Chronicle – Rochester , NY
By Sarah Tadeo
June 1, 2016

A different kind of music video debuted in Rochester this week, as local deaf and hard of hearing students unveil a completed sign language rendition of hit rock song The Middle Wednesday.

American Sign Language music videos of Pharrell’s Happy and Phillip Phillips’ Home, created by students at Deaf Film Camp at Camp Mark Seven in Old Forge, went viral on Youtube in the last two years. They were, in part, the creative vision of Stacy Lawrence of Pittsford, the founder and former executive director of Deaf Film Camp.

In May, Lawrence was instrumental in bringing deaf director and cinematographer Wayne Betts Jr. to Rochester School for the Deaf to help craft a new and unrelated video to those produced at Deaf Film Camp, set to the 2000s hit by Jimmy Eat World, with students in the school’s American Sign Language Video Production class.

Watch Video – Jimmy Eat World’s “The Middle” in ASL by Rochester School for the Deaf –  Read more  . . . signed video

“Spring Awakening” NY Trip – with Frederick Deaf Seniors Dec. 19

November 19, 2015 in Community Events

 

Spring Awakening Broadway Show ,
December 19, 2015 

Date: Saturday, December 19, 2015
Time: 6:00 AM – 11:00 PM
Showtime: 2:00 PM
Cost: $160 including bus trip

Deadline: by Monday, November 23—this trip will depend on the number of people signing up before I could order tickets. We need 45 people before I can confirm the trip

Itineary: Wolf’s Bus Company will provide a comfortable 47 seats bus and will depart in Frederick Maryland at 6 am. We will arrive New York around 12 or earlier. We will have lunch on our own. We will depart after the show and will have our dinner at NY or on the way back. The price included bus ride, Mezzanine Broadway show ticket, tips for bus driver. Limit to first 45 people.

More about Spring Awakening – Check this link at http://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/28/theater/review-spring-awakening-by-deaf-west-theater-brings-a-new-sensation-to-broadway.html?_r=1

Write a check payable to Frederick Deaf Seniors and mail it to 4909 Teen Barnes Road, Frederick Maryland 21703. For more information: please contact Jackie Kanekuni at Jackiekanekuni@gmail.com or call at 240-356-1160.

DOWNLOAD – SpringAwakeningDec19_Flyer

Deaf Queens Man Fights Back Against Truck Driving School

July 26, 2015 in Disability Law, Employment

 

 

Eyewitness News
Friday, July 24, 2015
By Rob Powers

He looks like anybody, starting a vehicle, going to work, getting on with life.

Only, this life, this story, is a little different.

Kenneth Frilando is deaf and his story is worth hearing. He claims the “Smith & Solomon School of Tractor Trailer Driving” in Linden, New Jersey won’t take him on as a student. He says he also has a New York commercial driver’s license, and a safety waiver, and now he’s filed suit.

“I need to break that door down because that’s not fair. Safety is the number one thing that I’m concerned with, but they’re just assuming that safety is out the window because the person can’t hear, that’s not the case,” Frilando said.

Read More  . .Watch Video  . Deaf Truck Driver

Career exploration summer camp offered for deaf, hard-of-hearing high school students

March 6, 2015 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

Shelburne News, VT
 

The Explore Your Future (EYF) program at Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf in Rochester, N.Y., offers deaf and hard-of-hearing college-bound high school students who will begin their junior or senior year in the fall of 2015 a unique opportunity to experience life on a college campus, explore their interests, and sample various careers. This six-day, summer career-exploration program provides students with hands-on activities related to careers in art, business, computer science, engineering, health sciences, information technology, science, and more.

EYF sessions for summer 2015 run July 11‑16 and July 18‑23. On the final day of each session, parents attend a workshop that helps them prepare their student for life after high school.

Students can apply online at www.rit.edu/NTID/EYF. For more information, call (585) 475-6700, (585) 743-1366 (videophone) or email EYFInfo@rit.edu. The application deadline is May 31.

RIT’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf offers educational programs and access and support services to 1,200 hard-of-hearing and deaf students who live, study and work with more than 15,000 hearing students on RIT’s campus. Visit www.rit.edu/NTID for more information.

 

 

Meet One of New York City’s First Deaf Uber Drivers

February 5, 2015 in Community News

 

Pin Lu Was an Accountant Before Ferrying Passengers; ‘Deaf People Are Good Drivers Because They Focus and Pay Attention’

Wall Street Journal
By LILIT MARCUS
Feb. 1 , 2015

In many ways, Pin Lu is a typical UberX driver.

He uses his own car, complete with a crocheted owl dangling from the rearview mirror, to ferry passengers who hail him via the popular ride-sharing app.

He often works long hours, saving to start his own business someday.

And he takes pride in his user ratings, saying he has earned 4.82 out of a possible 5 stars.

But when New Yorkers step into Mr. Lu’s green 2011 Honda Accord, many are surprised to be handed a note asking them to type a destination into the GPS.

Mr. Lu, the note explains, is deaf.

“Let me know if you have a preferred route by using your hand motion as direction,” it reads. “If you have any questions, knock your hand to my shoulder. Write/type note to me as communication.”

Uber Technologies Inc. estimates it has about 40 deaf “driver-partners” across the U.S. and predicts that number is likely to grow as the company expands into new markets.

Mr. Lu, a spokeswoman said, is one of its first in the New York area.

Mr. Lu, 29 years old, was born without hearing in Fuzhou, China, and immigrated to Queens with his family when he was 10.

After earning an accounting degree from the National Technical Institute for the Deaf at the Rochester Institute of Technology in 2011, he spent about two years doing accounting work for the Defense Department in Rome, N.Y., but he grew tired of small-town life “in the middle of nowhere,” he says.

Read Article and Photo’s . . .

Deaf viewers fight for on-screen movie captions

August 21, 2014 in Captioning / Relay, Community News, Technology

 

 

Democrat & Chronicle, Rochester , NY
David Riley, Staff writer
August 18, 2014

A loose-knit group of deaf and hard-of-hearing people wants movie theaters in the Rochester area to more readily provide captions on-screen if patrons ask for them.

About 40 advocates took their cause to the Regal Henrietta Stadium 18 theater earlier this month, said Dean DeRusso, a Gates resident who is deaf and participated in the protest. Many people had difficulty using special captioning glasses provided by the theater or thought the devices were uncomfortable, while others found that there were not enough for everyone to use, he said.

DeRusso said he asked theater employees to activate on-screen captions instead, but was told that only upper management could do so.

In DeRusso’s view, that means that the region’s large deaf population is not getting equal access to the theater. An estimate by the National Technical Institute for the Deafin 2012 said that more than 40,000 people who are deaf or hard of hearing live in greater Rochester — among the largest per capita populations with hearing difficulties in the U.S.

DeRusso said the theater should turn on captions for any movie when at least one deaf or hard-of-hearing person attends.

Read More . . .

HLAA Exhibitor: National Technical Institute for the Deaf (NTID)

June 30, 2011 in Education & Outreach

By Marla Dougherty  6/28/11 

I stopped by the RIT table and asked Mary Ellen Tait from NTID’s Center on Employment department, what she wanted our NVRC readers to know. Mary Ellen said she would be delighted if we could help get the word out on the RIT bachelor’s and master’s degree programs for veterans who have hearing loss as a result of their service.  Named to the 2010 Military Friendly Schools list, RIT offers tuition-reduced classes with access to C-Print captioning services, counseling, and audiology services which include cochlear implant mapping.

RIT holds a job fair every October and assists in finding internships. The graduates are high-tech, highly trained workers and the university helps find work positions. The Outreach Education and Training department offers on-site employer workshops with each program custom designed to address issues unique to that firm. For more information about the veterans degree program visit their website:  https://www.rit.edu/ntid/veterans/