Noise - Archive

New research finds noise harder on children than adults

March 3, 2016 in Community News

 

From the cacophony of day care to the buzz of TV and electronic toys, noise is more distracting to a child’s brain than an adult’s, and new research shows it can hinder how youngsters learn.

In fact, one of the worst offenders when a tot’s trying to listen is other voices babbling in the background, researchers said Saturday at a meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

“What a child hears in a noisy environment is not what an adult hears,” said Dr. Lori Leibold of Boys Town National Research Hospital in Omaha, Nebraska.

Read more  . . . NOISE

Dining Out With Hearing Loss – An Architect Responds

February 25, 2016 in Community News

 

 

LIVING WITH HEARING LOSS

I am happy to see that my recent post How To Choose A Restaurant When You Have Hearing Loss is getting some attention! It is clear from the response that dining out is not only challenging for people with hearing loss, but for everyone. The issue of restaurant noise is so important, it inspired leading Los Angeles-based architect Anthony Poon to share his thoughts on how important acoustics are to any good restaurant design. 

In his post My Ears Are Ringing, he provides several tricks of the trade that restaurants can use to improve acoustics for all. These suggestions include:

Read more . . . Dining out

OSHA’s Occupational Hearing Loss Standard: How to Check if Your Workplace is Too Noisy

April 28, 2015 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

AMI Environmental
Aug 22, 2013

 What is ‘s Occupational  Standard?
OSHA regulations stipulate that if “any employee’s exposure equals or exceeds an 8-hour time-weighted average of 85 decibels, the employer shall develop and implement a noise monitoring program.”

What are some signs that your  has hazardous noise?

• If at work, you have to raise your voice for someone standing an arm’s length or less away to hear you.

• There is a ringing in your ears after you leave work.

• You have temporary hearing loss upon leaving work.

How can you test if the noise level at your workplace reaches dangerous levels?
You can’t be sure whether you’re being protected from hazardous noise or meeting OSHA regulations without completing an audiometric test. But you can compare your noise exposure levels at work to these everyday noises to get a vague idea of your risk level:

• 80 dB – Dial tone of a phone

• 85 dB – City traffic from inside a car

• 90 dB – Truck traffic or a train while at 500 ft

• 95 dB – Subway train at 200 ft

• 100 dB – Snowmobile or Motorcycle

• 107 dB – Power mower

While these comparisons can give you can vague idea of whether or not your workplace complies with OSHA standards, it is important to get a formal test done to make sure you and your employees are protected.

See resource article  . . . . Noise

MSU Professor Takes Students Aboard Aircraft Carriers to Research Sound Exposure

April 3, 2015 in Community News

 

 

 KATE LOCHTE & MATT MARKGRAF

Noise-inducing hearing loss is a serious health threat to Navy personnel, that costs the Department of Veterans Affairs over $100 million dollars each year. Dr. Gary Morris, chair of the Department of Occupational Safety and Health in the Jesse D. Jones College of Science, Engineering and Technology at Murray State University researches hearing loss in the Navy with his students and joins Kate Lochte on Sounds Good to talk about his work as part of our Racer Scholar Profiles series, which highlights MSU faculty research, scholarly and creative activities across colleges and schools.

Dr. Morris is retired US Navy with a specialty in occupational safety and health. While in the Navy, he served as an industrial hygiene officer for 20 years. He studies the noise levels people work and live with on a carrier. “The VA spends about $127 million dollars each year on new noise claims,” he says, adding that this ia very big issue in the Navy and DOD. His research centers on the question, “how can we help the Navy reduce those claims and protect the sailors?”

Read more  . . . Sound

Loud Noise Could Cause Hearing Loss in Unborn, Newborn Babies

November 26, 2013 in Community News, Research

Noise could cause hearing loss in unborn and newborn babies

By Diana Nabiruma, The Observer 11/26/2013

One expectant mother was advised by other mothers, to expose her unborn baby to loud noises.

“Your home is too quiet. If you continue staying there all the time, your baby will not be used to noise when she is born and every small noise will upset her. You should go to loud places like nightclubs or the taxi park so that your baby gets used to noise.”

The expectant mother heeded their advice and whenever she could, she hauled her heavy self off to loud bars. And when her daughter was born, she was quite desensitized to noise. She could sleep next to a music system playing music at volume 20 and not wake up. This mother was quite proud of her achievement.

Read more . . . →

AG Bell Association Information on Classroom Acoustics

March 29, 2013 in Hearing Loss & Deafness, Technology

Classroom Acoustics Information

From the Alexander Graham Bell Association www.agbell.org

As they age, buildings can only get noisier, not quieter – cracks form and widen, duct anchors come loose and vibrate, fans and belts begin to squeal. Whatever the mix of exterior and interior noise, the best retrofit solutions are the ones that counteract multiple sources at the same time.

Hiring a qualified acoustician who can help find those solutions is highly recommended, and can leverage all the other investments you make in an existing building. Learn more about reducing noise in learning spaces with the Alexander Graham Bell Association’s article, Reducing Noise in Learning Spaces at http://www.listeningandspokenlanguage.org/Document.aspx?id=185


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

Tips for Hearing Safety During the Holidays

December 19, 2012 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness, NVRC Announcements

‘Tis the Season for Noise

From Noisy Planet, NIDCD 12/18/2012

This holiday season, while bells are ringing and voices are singing, think about how all that festive noise affects your hearing. Check out a few tips below to make this holiday a “hearing healthy” one.

• Pack hearing protectors, such as earplugs or ear muffs, if you’re attending a local seasonal concert or other festivities. Musical programs can register at or over 120 decibels—that’s roughly as loud as an ambulance siren.

• Examine the noise levels of the toys you give and get. Some toys have volume controls so you can turn them down.

• Preset the volume on any music devices you give or receive to a safe sound level.

For more information, visit:

Where’s the noise? Everywhere, and it’s getting louder! (NIDCD’s Noisy Planet Campaign)
http://www.noisyplanet.nidcd.nih.gov/info/Pages/wherethenoise.aspx?nav=update

Noisy Toy list (Sight and Hearing Association)
http://www.sightandhearing.org/news/healthissue/archive/hi_1212.asp


Distributed 2012 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.