Noise Induced - Archive

It’s a Noisy Planet. Protect Their Hearing.

August 12, 2015 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is 100 percent preventable. Yet approximately 26 million Americans between the ages of 20 and 69 have high-frequency hearing loss from overexposure to loud noises at work or during leisure activities. More than 30 million Americans are exposed to dangerous levels of noise on a regular basis1. Children also are frequently exposed to noise levels that could permanently damage their hearing. Noise levels generated by activities as common as doing yard work, playing a band instrument, and attending sports events can result in NIHL. Research suggests that NIHL experienced at an early age may accelerate age-related hearing loss later in life.

NIDCD

In October 2008, the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), launched It’s a Noisy Planet. Protect Their Hearing. The Noisy Planet campaign is designed to increase awareness among parents of children ages 8 to 12 (“tweens”) about the causes and prevention of NIHL. With this information, parents and other caring adults can encourage children to adopt healthy habits that will help them protect their hearing for life.

 

 

 

NIDCD

NIDCD is focusing its campaign on the parents of tweens because children at this age are becoming more independent and developing their own attitudes and habits related to their health. They also are beginning to develop their own listening, leisure, and work habits—or soon will do so. Consequently, the tween years present an open window of opportunity to educate children about their hearing and how to protect it.

Parents still have a great deal of influence over their tween’s behavior, and the Noisy Planet campaign provides them with resources that they can use to educate their children about the causes and prevention of NIHL. The campaign Web site at noisyplanet.nidcd.nih.gov provides parents with facts about NIHL, tips on how to encourage their tween to adopt healthy hearing habits, and other steps they can take to protect their tween’s hearing. The site also offers information specifically for tweens, such as interactive games about noise and hearing.

New study finds genetic predisposition for noise-induced hearing loss

April 22, 2015 in Research

 

 

MedicalXPress
April 16, 2015

In a new genome-wide association study, an international team led by Keck Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC) neuroscientists has found evidence that some people may be more genetically susceptible to noise-induced hearing loss than others.

Noise-induced  is one of the most common work-related illnesses in the United States, according to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. At especially high risk are troops in the Armed Forces. In 2013, the Department of Veterans Affairs reported hearing loss as one of the most common disabilities among veterans receiving disability compensation.

Those at higher, genetic risk for hearing loss may decide to take additional precautionary measures to protect their hearing prior to hazardous noise exposure, study authors say.

Read More  . . . noise-induced hearing loss

Related article  “Noise-related Hearing Loss Might be in Your Genes”

 

 

Foundation seeks to teach young people about hearing loss epidemic

August 21, 2014 in Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

Miami Herald
Tuesday, 08.19.14
BY ANA VECIANA-SUAREZ
AVECIANA-SUAREZ@MIAMIHERALD.COM

Three years ago, when the noise level at the American Airlines Arena shrieked to a deafening level, fan Adele Sandberg covered her ears and winced. Intent on the fast-paced court action, she didn’t yet know about the growing danger of hearing loss. She didn’t know yet that preventing it would become her passion.

But with the cheers and the loudspeaker announcements still echoing in her ears, Sandberg returned home to North Miami Beach and began researching hearing loss. What she discovered shocked her: One of five U.S. teenagers suffers from some form of noise-induced hearing loss by the age of 19. And more than 50 percent of U.S. high school students have reported at least one symptom of hearing loss, such as ringing in the ears.

The problem is getting worse. One study concluded that the proportion of second graders with some form of hearing loss had doubled in the past 10 years, while the proportion of eighth graders had quadrupled.

“We have an epidemic of hearing loss, and I don’t say this lightly,” said Sandberg, 70. “A lot of people suffer from this but don’t know it because it’s so gradual. And once it happens, it’s irreversible.”

Read more . . .

Celebrate the Sounds of Summer for a Lifetime: Protect Your Hearing, the Better Hearing Institute Urges

July 3, 2014 in Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

By eTeligis
Jun 30, 2014 7:31:05 AM PDT
Article Source

WASHINGTON, DC, United States, via eTeligis Inc., 06/30/2014 – – As summertime kicks into full swing, the Better Hearing Institute (BHI) (www.betterhearing.org) is urging children, teens, and adults of all ages to protect their hearing, reminding them that permanent noise-induced hearing loss cannot be reversed.

The sounds of summer are among the most cherished and offer wonderful lifetime memories. But summertime also brings loud noises that can permanently harm our hearing. Prolonged exposure to the roar of lawn mowers, power tools, motorized recreational vehicles, target shooting, concerts, loud sporting events, and fireworks all can wreak havoc on our hearing. In fact, the single bang of a firecracker at close range can permanently damage hearing in an instant, making it forever more difficult to hear the subtler sounds of summer.

While many noisy recreational activities are part of summer fun, it is extremely important to take precautions to ensure that these activities do not damage our hearing.

“Hearing is the sense that connects us to each other,” says William Hal Martin, Ph.D., Professor of Otolaryngology, National University of Singapore, Program Director MSc of Audiology, Center for Hearing, Speech & Balance, and Co-Director of Dangerous Decibels. “Exposure to loud sounds cannot only destroy our ability to hear, it can cause tinnitus — ringing in the ears.”

Read more  . . .

Researchers find potential cure for noise-induced hearing loss

February 28, 2014 in Research

From KLTV7 – KLTV.com 2/26/14

A new procedure could soon help people who have noise-induced hearing loss.

A new procedure could soon help people who have noise-induced hearing loss.

By Kristen King – email,

If you know someone who works in a construction site or listens to their music a little too loudly, then this story is for you. Very loud noises are one of the most common causes of hearing loss. Now a new study says that loss of hearing may not have to be permanent.

Almost 50 million Americans are affected by hearing loss. Dr Jennifer Holdman of Livingston Audiology and Hearing Aid Center gives tests to determine noise induced hearing loss.

“We have noise exposure from occupations. Right now, hearing aids are the only solution. Nothing’s perfect but we can get people where they need to be able to communicate clearly with their loved ones,” says Holdman.

Read more . . . .

Copyright 2014 KLTV. All rights reserved.

 

 

French Horn Players at Risk of Hearing Loss

October 5, 2013 in Research

Professional French horn players in danger of developing noise-induced hearing loss

From Science News 9/24/2013

Professional French horn players may need to seriously consider adopting effective strategies to prevent noise induced hearing loss (NIHL). A new study published online in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene (JOEH) found further evidence that French horn players are one of the most at-risk groups of developing NIHL among professional orchestral musicians.

“Using both conservative and lenient criteria for hearing loss and correcting for age, we found that between 11 percent and 22 percent of the participants showed some form of hearing loss typical of NIHL,” said study investigator Ian O’Brien, MPhil, MAudSA, CCP, a doctoral degree candidate at the University of Sydney and a professional French horn player. “Looking at those aged 40 years or younger and also correcting for age, the number of horn players with an apparent hearing loss rose to between 17 percent and 33 percent.”

The study, conducted by researchers from the University of Queensland and the University of Sydney at the 2010 annual gathering of the International Horn Society in Brisbane, Australia, examined the hearing of 144 French horn players. The investigators performed audiometric assessments and measured sound levels and hearing thresholds to determine if the horn players were at risk of harmful sound exposure.

O’Brien and his colleagues also administered a questionnaire to investigate the horn players’ safety practices and attitudes about hearing conservation.

“We were surprised to find that only 18 percent of participants reported using any form of hearing protection,” said lead investigator Wayne Wilson, PhD, MAudSA, CCP, a senior lecturer in audiology at the University of Queensland. “Even within that 18 percent, the use of hearing protection appears to be inadequate with 81 percent of these participants reporting their frequency of use as ‘sometimes’ and 50 percent reporting they use generic, foam or other inferior forms of protection.”

According to the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD), when individuals are exposed to loud noise over a long period of time, symptoms of NIHL will increase gradually. The NIDCD recommends preventing NIHL by regularly using hearing protectors such as earplugs or earmuffs. Designed specifically for musicians such as French horn players, these devices are commercially available.

Read the rest of the story at http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/09/130924122835.htm

 


 

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