NFL - Archive

Derrick Coleman on Life as a Deaf NFL Player and Making ‘No Excuses’

June 5, 2015 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

GOOD MORNING AMERICA
June 2, 2015, 8:36 AM ET

Seahawk in Silence – Derrick Coleman

September 19, 2014 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

K5 Western Washington’s Home Team
September 11, 2014
Article Source

SEATTLE—The Seattle Seahawks play in arguably the loudest stadium in the world. Yet one Seahawk can’t hear the crowd.

Running back Derrick Coleman scored a key touchdown in the Seahawks’ season-opening win against the Packers. The fans went crazy. But Derrick only saw the cheers.

“I could feel it in my body, but my ears didn’t really catch it all. My body did though.”

He lost most of his hearing from a childhood disease at age 3.

“When people tell me I can’t do something, it just makes me want to do.”

He is one of the few hearing-impaired athletes to make it to the NFL. He may be the only one to make it on offense, where hearing can be critical as quarterback Russell Wilson often changes a play with his voice.

“So he knows straight up OK y’know look at me. Or you don’t have to look at me, just face me.”

Like he has most of his life, Derrick figures out a way to make it work. He wears hearing aids in both ears. But they don’t work well with the noise of the game. So he plays mostly in silence. He says that’s a good thing.

“My disability is actually an advantage over everybody else. Now they’re tryin’ to hear the play. They really gotta focus. All I gotta do is look at ’em and talk.”

 

Retired NFL Players May be at Risk for Hearing Loss and Tinnitus

July 11, 2014 in Community News, Research

 

 

Released: 7-Jul-2014 11:00 AM EDT 
Source Newsroom: Loyola University Health System
Article Surce

Newswise — MAYWOOD, Ill. – Retired NFL players may be at risk for permanent hearing loss and tinnitus, according to Loyola University Medical Center ear surgeon John Leonetti, MD.

Many NFL players suffer one or more concussions during their careers. And Leonetti notes that such blunt head trauma has been associated with hearing loss and tinnitus (chronic ringing or buzzing in the ears).

Leonetti said there are two possible mechanisms by which blunt head trauma, such as a blow to the head, could damage hearing or cause tinnitus:
– A blow to the head can cause the brain to wiggle like Jell-O, thereby damaging the nerves that connect the brain to the inner ear.
– A blow to the head also can create a shock wave that damages the cochlea, the delicate auditory portion of the inner ear.
There is anecdotal evidence that athletes who play football and other contact sports may be at risk for hearing damage:
– Leonetti recently spoke to retired players alongside EarQ at a meeting of the Chicago chapter of the NFL Players Association. When Leonetti asked how many players had experienced concussions during their career, they all raised their hands. When Leonetti asked how many have experienced hearing loss approximately 25 percent raised their hands. When he asked how many have tinnitus approximately 50 percent raised their hands.
– Hall of Fame NFL lineman Joe DeLamielleure told USA Today that he experienced countless blows to the head during a 13-year career, and has suffered a 68 percent hearing loss in his left ear as a result.
– Retired NHL hockey player Curt Bennett alleged in a class action lawsuit that he suffered from injuries associated with concussions and sub-concussive impacts, including tinnitus and hearing loss in both ears.

“To date, there is no proof that NFL players are suffering hearing loss and tinnitus at a rate higher than that of other men their ages,” Leonetti said. “But based on what we already know about blunt head trauma, as well as anecdotal reports from retired athletes, we believe there are compelling reasons to conduct a scientifically rigorous study to quantify the risk of hearing loss and tinnitus among retired NFL players.”

Leonetti is a professor in the departments of Otolaryngology and Neurological Surgery and program director of Cranial Base Surgery at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine.

Gallaudet DE Talaat earns tryout with Seattle Seahawks

May 10, 2014 in Community News

Sat. 5/10/2014  10:30 PM

Breaking News

http://www.yardbarker.com/nfl/articles/gallaudet_de_talaat_earns_tryout_with_seattle_seahawks/16443793

Adham Talaat, DE from DIII Gallaudet University, has earned a rookie minicamp tryout with the Seattle Seahawks. He’s been told that if he impresses there, he will be signed to a contract. The post Gallaudet DE Talaat earns tryout with Seattle Seahawks appeared first on NFL Draft Diamonds.

Gallaudet’s Talaat could join rare group as deaf NFL player

May 6, 2014 in Community News

Washington Post, WRITTEN BY
Anna Katherine Clemmons
PUBLISHED: MAY 2  Link to Article

Adham Talaat almost didn’t play college football. Now, the hearing-impaired graduate of Gallaudet University has a shot at the NFL.

Read Entire Article – View Video & Pictures . . .

Adham Talaat

Can Attending an NFL Game Be Hazardous to Your Hearing?

January 3, 2014 in Hearing Loss & Deafness, Uncategorized

Can Attending An NFL Game Be Hazardous To Your Hearing?
Salus University College of Audiology Offers Fan-friendly Advice as Eagles-Saints Clash Nears

From Gnomes National News Service, 1/2/2014

This NFL season has seen unprecedented competition among fan bases vying for the crown of loudest stadium venue. Dr. Victor H. Bray, Dean of the Salus University George S. Osborne College of Audiology, and his colleagues, are concerned about potential hearing damage amid the increasingly deafening drumbeat to rock the house on the road to the Super Bowl.  ”The decibel levels at most football stadiums are beginning to resemble NASCAR races, so it makes good sense for fans to bring and use hearing protection. As a general rule, if a fan has to shout to be heard by the person next to them, that’s a sure sign that it’s loud enough to warrant the use of earplugs or headphones,” he suggests.  “Use of foam earplugs, especially early in life, is easy and relatively inexpensive compared to the reliance on hearing aids later in life.”

Read more . . . →