Loss - Archive

A billion at risk for hearing loss from exposure to loud music

March 10, 2015 in Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

(CNN)“Hey dude — can you turn your music down?”

If anyone says this to you while you’re wearing your earbuds, take note: You are probably endangering your hearing.

More than one billion teens and young adults are at risk of losing their hearing, according to WHO (that’s the World Health Organization, not the rock band).

It’s not just old folks who suffer hearing loss. Just by listening to music at what you probably think is a normal level, or hanging out in loud bars, nightclubs and music and sporting events, you can permanently damage your hearing.

By analyzing listening habits of 12- to 35-year-olds in wealthier countries around the world, WHO found nearly 50% of those studied listen to unsafe sound levels on personal audio devices and about 40% are exposed to damaging levels of music and noise at entertainment venues.

It doesn’t take much time to damage your hearing at a sports bar or nightclub. According to the WHO, “exposure to noise levels of 100 dB, which is typical in such venues, is safe for no more than 15 minutes.”

Faking It with My Hearing Loss, By Nancy M. Williams

January 29, 2015 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

What Bert and Ernie Taught Me About the Letter L and Love

Grand Piano Passion
By Nancy M. Williams, Founding Editor

January 26, 2015

Fakers. We all know they’re out there when it comes to hearing loss. Of course, it takes a faker to know one.

A man stops my daughter and me on the street. Traffic zooms behind him, the roar rushing into my hearing aids. “Hleiof lskjafj flto Bloomfield?” he asks. I surmise, with the bus shelter nearby, that he must have asked, when will the bus come for Bloomfield?

“I’m sorry, I don’t know the bus schedules,” I say. The man gives me a perplexed look, shakes his head, and walks away.

“Why didn’t you just say, I didn’t hear you? How come you keep on faking it?”

“He didn’t ask you about the buses!” my daughter says. “He wanted to know which way is Bloomfield.

Why didn’t you just say,
I didn’t hear you?
How come you keep
on faking it?”

An audiologist first diagnosed my mild, high-frequency loss shortly after I turned six. I got my first hearing aid at 12, and then for the next several decades tried not to notice while my hearing slowly slid down the audiologist’s . . . .

Read More  . . .

5 Unhealthy Habits That Can Cause Hearing Loss

September 17, 2014 in Community News

 

 

Hearing Aid Company of Texas
SEPTEMBER 10, 2014
 BY
Original Article

You may not think your overall health has anything to do with your hearing, but it’s true. Your hearing is intricately interwoven with the overall functionality of your body and vice versa. Many studies has been done that link hearing with conditions in various parts of the body, illustrating that many of these adverse affects are connected to an unhealthy habit of some sort. Perhaps you don’t even realize that what you’re doing is harming your hearing. The good news is, if you’re aware of what’s going on, you do something to lessen your risk and exposure to hearing damage.

Loud Noises

Many people love to attend rock concerts, but the truth is, the extremely loud noises these events produce can damage your hearing. Each pulse of the speakers can bring on temporary and long-term damage to your ears, so never sit close to the speakers when at a concert. Instead, sit or stand in the back. Concerts aren’t the only thing that expose you to loud noises. This can involve hiking up the volume on the TV or video games to dangerous levels. These negative habits can have a bad effect on your hearing.

Listening to an MP3 Player

Many people, especially young people, like to drown out the noise of everyday life with their MP3 players. They pop in some ear buds and listen to their favorite tunes, whether on the subway or in a lecture hall. However, the loud volumes produced by such actions can lead to significant hearing damage over time. When you do this, you are basically sending a large amount of sound directly into your inner ear where it cannot diffuse properly. When all that energy crashes against your eardrum, you can experience hearing loss.

Sedentary Lifestyle

A real threat to young and old in this country and others is obesity. This can develop through a sedentary lifestyle that does not include proper exercise and eating the right foods. While obesity poses many health dangers for people, one of the biggest is the possibility of developing diabetes, which leads to poor circulation throughout the body. People with poor circulation are at a greater risk of hearing loss. One way to guard against this is to exercise regularly and eat a healthy diet.

Smoking

Smoking is detrimental to many areas of your health, most notably your lungs and breathing, but did you know it’s also bad for your hearing? While you may not readily make the connection between smoking and hearing, this bad habit definitely poses a significant threat due to the chemicals in the cigarettes that can damage the vibration sensors in the ears. This makes it harder for the ear to pick up on small sounds, posing far-reaching impacts.

Failure to Visit Your Doctor

If you don’t go to the doctor on a regular basis, you could be missing out on opportunities to evaluate your hearing. Your doctor can pick up on hearing losses and treat them successfully if caught early. You have to do your part and see your doctor yearly so he or she can track any possible changes. Your doctor will not only assess your hearing risk but will advise you on how to improve your lifestyle and lower your risk of hearing loss.

Original Article

 

Fireworks can lead to hearing loss in children

July 3, 2014 in Hearing Loss & Deafness

 
POSTED: WEDNESDAY, JULY 2, 2014 1:00 AM
Nathan Williams, AuD.
Article Source

Whether you are shooting fireworks in your drive-way or watching a public display, you could be at risk of having some hearing damage.

Fireworks produce a sound output that is in the 150 to 175 decibel range.

Each year, many people experience some damage to their hearing as a result of fireworks.

HOW FIREWORKS AFFECT HEARING

There are two things to note when considering whether or not fireworks will have the potential to cause hearing loss. First is the distance a person is from the sound source. Sound is less likely to affect your hearing the further you are positioned from the firework explosion.

The second thing to consider is how loud the firework actually is. The World Health Organization recommends that adults not be exposed to more than 140 decibels of peak sound pressure. For children, the recommendation is 120 decibels.

If you are dealing with a firework that explodes at 170 decibels, you would have to stand 15 to 20 meters away before you are at a safe limit. Children would have to stand 50 to 60 meters away from that same firework. Infants should not be exposed to fireworks, because they generally experience the greatest amount of sound pressure.

Exposure to loud sounds can result in the following:

 

Read more . . .

Celebrate the Sounds of Summer for a Lifetime: Protect Your Hearing, the Better Hearing Institute Urges

July 3, 2014 in Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

By eTeligis
Jun 30, 2014 7:31:05 AM PDT
Article Source

WASHINGTON, DC, United States, via eTeligis Inc., 06/30/2014 – – As summertime kicks into full swing, the Better Hearing Institute (BHI) (www.betterhearing.org) is urging children, teens, and adults of all ages to protect their hearing, reminding them that permanent noise-induced hearing loss cannot be reversed.

The sounds of summer are among the most cherished and offer wonderful lifetime memories. But summertime also brings loud noises that can permanently harm our hearing. Prolonged exposure to the roar of lawn mowers, power tools, motorized recreational vehicles, target shooting, concerts, loud sporting events, and fireworks all can wreak havoc on our hearing. In fact, the single bang of a firecracker at close range can permanently damage hearing in an instant, making it forever more difficult to hear the subtler sounds of summer.

While many noisy recreational activities are part of summer fun, it is extremely important to take precautions to ensure that these activities do not damage our hearing.

“Hearing is the sense that connects us to each other,” says William Hal Martin, Ph.D., Professor of Otolaryngology, National University of Singapore, Program Director MSc of Audiology, Center for Hearing, Speech & Balance, and Co-Director of Dangerous Decibels. “Exposure to loud sounds cannot only destroy our ability to hear, it can cause tinnitus — ringing in the ears.”

Read more  . . .

Gael Hannan on Being a Hearing Loss Nut


November 8, 2013 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness

Am I a Hearing Loss Nut?

By Gael Hannan, Hearing Health Matters, 11/5/2013

Sometimes – just sometimes – when I mention hearing loss to my family or friends, I hear something, very soft, that I’m pretty sure is the sound of an inner groan.

“Oh no, here it comes again. The hearing loss thing.”

It’s not that my nearest and dearest don’t care about my hearing challenges, or don’t want to communicate with me. They have been doing it for years, mostly without complaint or impatience – although one friend will say something and then immediately repeat it, just so she doesn’t have to hear me say pardon.  But as accommodating as they are – and should be – I’m sure that they wish that, just for once, I could go more than five minutes without working ‘hearing loss’ into the conversation.

Read more . . . →

Give Input on SSA Criteria for Evaluating Hearing Loss

September 19, 2013 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness

SSA proposes changes to criteria for evaluating hearing loss, disturbances of labyrinthine-vestibular function

By CCH® UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE — 9/19/2013SSAlogo

The SSA is requesting comments on whether and how it should revise the criteria in its Listing of Impairments (listings) for evaluating hearing loss and disturbances of labyrinthine-vestibular function in adults and children.

The SSA is inviting comments and suggestions from individuals who apply for or receive benefits from the agency; advocates and organizations that represent individuals who have hearing disorders or disturbances of labyrinthine-vestibular function, state agencies that make disability determinations for the SSA, experts in the evaluation of hearing disorders, researchers, and other members of the general public.

The agency is interested in any comments and suggestions on how it might revise introductory text §§2.00B and 102.00B, listing §2.07 for evaluating disturbances of labyrinthine-vestibular function, and listings §§2.10, 2.11, 102.10, and 102.11 for evaluating hearing loss. For example:

  • Do the rules for evaluating hearing loss or disturbances of labyrinthine-vestibular function contain technical language or jargon that is not clearly explained? If not clearly explained, what technical language or jargon needs further explanation?
  • Are the requirements for otological examinations and audiometric testing provided in §§2.00B and 102.00B clearly stated? If not clearly stated, what requirements need further clarification?
  • What types of testing should the agency consider when evaluating hearing loss in adults or children who cannot cooperate in behavioral testing?
  • Would it be helpful to add a sample audiogram that contains all the requirements necessary for evaluation of hearing loss in adults or children?
  • What word recognition tests other than the Hearing in Noise Test (HINT) or the Hearing in Noise Test-Children (HINT-C) should the agency consider when it evaluates hearing loss treated with cochlear implantation?
  • Should the SSA provide examples of medical reasons for a discrepancy between the speech reception threshold and the pure tone average?
  • Could the SSA improve clarity by replacing the phrase “disturbances in labyrinthine-vestibular function” with the phrase “disturbances of inner ear function”?
  • Rather than evaluating disturbances in labyrinthine-vestibular function in adults under the listings, would evaluating disturbances in labyrinthine-vestibular function using residual functional capacity improve the determination process?
  • Should the SSA continue to evaluate disturbances of labyrinthine-vestibular function under the Special Senses and Speech body system?
  • What else could the SSA do to make the rules for evaluating hearing or disturbances in labyrinthine-vestibular function easier to understand?
  • Would a different format make the rules easier to understand (for example, changing the grouping or ordering of sections; use of headings; paragraphing; use of diagrams; use of tables)?
  • Experts who study disability believe that many personal, environmental, educational, and social factors contribute in significant ways to the relationship between an individual’s hearing ability and the ability to work. Rather than providing criteria for evaluating hearing loss in adults under the listings, should the SSA evaluate all hearing loss using re53700, August 30, 2013sidual functional capacity?

Comments are due by October 29, 2013, and may be submitted by Internet, fax or mail to one of the addresses listed in the notice. The docket number is SSA-2012-0075.

For further information, contact Cheryl A. Williams, Office of Medical Listings Improvement, SSA, 6401 Security Blvd., Baltimore, Maryland 21235-6401, (410) 965-1020 (78 Fed. Reg. 53700, August 30, 2013).

 

Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. You do not need permission to share this information, but please be sure to credit NVRC.  This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

NVRC OPEN HOUSE CELEBRATION – 25 YEARS – Nov. 2

September 17, 2013 in NVRC

25Year-NVRC_logoNVRC OPEN HOUSE

When:    November 2, 2013
Time:     10:00 AM to 3:00 PM
Where:  Northern Virginia Resource Center
for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC)
                3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130
                Fairfax, VA 22030

                 DIRECTIONS to NVRC

Come celebrate with us! 

  • Visit our Demo Room, learn about the Virginia Technology Assistance Program
  • Meet our staff to learn about our outreach, interpreter and technology programs and our advocacy successes
  • Tour NVRC’s offices with members of our Board of Directors and Ambassadors’ Club
  • Enjoy light refreshments and fun raffles
  • Register for an ASL class or schedule an educational program

Come see why NVRC has been the area’s leading non-profit
for people with hearing loss for 25 years!
Interpreters and CART (live captions) will be available.

HLAA Selected to Host IFHOH Congress in 2016

June 29, 2013 in Community News

 HLAA news release header
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
June 28, 2013
CONTACT:
Nancy Macklin
Director of Events and Marketing
nmacklin@hearingloss.org

Hearing Loss Association of America Selected to Host IFHOH Congress in 2016

Portland, OR: “We are delighted to announce that the Hearing Loss Association of America(HLAA) has been selected by the International Federation of Hard of Hearing People(IFHOH) to host their next Congress in 2016,” said Ruth Warick, president of IFHOH. President Warick made the announcement at the Opening Session of the HLAA Convention 2013 in Portland, Oregon, last night, June 27.

Planning for Convention 2016 and the IFHOH Congress is already underway and will be held in Washington, D.C. at the Washington Hilton, June 23–26.

HLAA and IFHOH welcome people with hearing loss from around the world to share in outstanding educational workshops, a cutting-edge research symposium, a trade show with state-of-the-art hearing technology, and fun social events for all ages.

HLAA Executive Director Brenda Battat states, “This is an outstanding opportunity to present issues that are impacting people with hearing loss worldwide and to learn from different countries’ perspectives and solutions. It’s an honor to host this important Congress.”

Ruth Warick, president of the IFHOH comments, “We are grateful to our member organization, HLAA, for hosting this important event for hard of hearing persons, professionals and other interested persons to gather together to discuss vital issues and forge connections. We have made great strides in the last decade but much remains to be done to create greater awareness and to promote a hearing accessible world.” More than 278 million people worldwide have moderate-to-profound hearing loss in both ears (World Health Organization, 2005).

Founded in 1977, IFHOH is a non-profit organization that represents the interests of people with hearing loss to promote greater understanding of hearing loss issues and to improve access worldwide. It provides a platform for cooperation and information exchange among its members and interested parties. IFHOH has more than 45 member and affiliate organizations in 30 countries.

About Hearing Loss Association of America (HLAA)
The Hearing Loss Association of America (HLAA), founded in 1979, opens the world of communication to people with hearing loss through information, education, advocacy, and support. HLAA publishes the bimonthly Hearing Loss Magazine, holds annual Conventions, produces the national Walk4Hearing®, and advocates for the rights of people with hearing loss. HLAA has an extensive network of chapters and state organizations. The national headquarters is located at 7910 Woodmont Avenue, Suite 1200, Bethesda, MD 20814. Phone: 301.657.2248 or visit www.hearingloss.org

Hearing Loss Association of America 7910 Woodmont Ave, Suite 1200 Bethesda, MD 20814
Phone: 301-657-2248  |  Fax: 301-913-9413  |  Email: inquiry@hearingloss.org  |   www.hearingloss.org


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Copyright © 2013 Hearing Loss Association of America®. All Rights Reserved.

 

 


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. You do not need permission to share this information, but please be sure to credit NVRC.  This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

Pittsburgh Firefighters Sue Over Siren Hearing Loss

April 24, 2013 in Community News, Emergency Preparedness, Hearing Loss & Deafness

From Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, 4/23/2013  

Four Pittsburgh firefighters filed a lawsuit Monday against several manufacturers alleging loud sirens on the trucks they use for their jobs have caused hearing loss.

Three of the firefighters, Ralph N. Bilski, Jeremiah Dengler and Roger J. Maher III have been employed by the city since at least 1981, and another, Mark W. Godlewski, was hired in 2000. They claim the sirens have caused irreversible hearing damage.

The complaint names as defendants American Lafrance, E-One Inc., Kovatch Mobile Equipment Corp., Mack Trucks Inc., Pierce Manufacturing Inc., Seagrave Fire Apparatus and Federal Signal Corp.

The lawsuit alleges that the trucks were defective in that they lacked sufficient insulation to protect firefighters’ hearing. In addition, the plaintiffs claim that the companies that made the sirens, as well as the truck manufacturers, failed to provide warnings about their use.

The lawsuit does not name the city of Pittsburgh as a defendant. City solicitor Dan Regan said he couldn’t comment because he hadn’t seen the lawsuit.

He referred calls to Public Safety Director Mike Huss, who did not return a message late Monday.

Read more: http://www.post-gazette.com/stories/local/neighborhoods-city/city-firefighters-sue-over-siren-hearing-loss-684645/#ixzz2ROao16BA

___________________________________________________________________________________________
Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

What Hearing Loss Sounds Like

April 8, 2013 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

The Real Sounds of Hearing Loss

The website of Houston Public Radio has a great series of audio clips that simulate what sound is like to someone with a hearing loss. It’s a great resource for friends, family members, co-workers, and others to help increase their understanding.

Check it out at:
http://app1.kuhf.org/articles/npr1365277877-The-Real-Sounds-Of-Hearing-Loss.html


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

Tips for Hearing Safety During the Holidays

December 19, 2012 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness, NVRC Announcements

‘Tis the Season for Noise

From Noisy Planet, NIDCD 12/18/2012

This holiday season, while bells are ringing and voices are singing, think about how all that festive noise affects your hearing. Check out a few tips below to make this holiday a “hearing healthy” one.

• Pack hearing protectors, such as earplugs or ear muffs, if you’re attending a local seasonal concert or other festivities. Musical programs can register at or over 120 decibels—that’s roughly as loud as an ambulance siren.

• Examine the noise levels of the toys you give and get. Some toys have volume controls so you can turn them down.

• Preset the volume on any music devices you give or receive to a safe sound level.

For more information, visit:

Where’s the noise? Everywhere, and it’s getting louder! (NIDCD’s Noisy Planet Campaign)
http://www.noisyplanet.nidcd.nih.gov/info/Pages/wherethenoise.aspx?nav=update

Noisy Toy list (Sight and Hearing Association)
http://www.sightandhearing.org/news/healthissue/archive/hi_1212.asp


Distributed 2012 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.