Live - Archive

Management of Hearing Loss Prevention in Live Entertainment

December 19, 2014 in Hearing Loss & Deafness, Research

 

 

AudiologyOnline
Robert M. Ghent Jr., AuD
December 15, 2014

Editor’s Note: This text course is an edited transcript of a live webinar. Download supplemental course materials.

Dr. Robert Ghent: Today I’m going to discuss management of hearing loss prevention in live entertainment. I’ll cover why this area has not been more recognized and what opportunities are available for audiologists. I’ll also talk about what management of hearing loss means in the live entertainment industry. Live entertainment includes sporting events, racing events, and concerts of all types, not just rock and roll, but the primary focus today is on music events.

I work for Honeywell Safety Products. Many of the pictures in your handout are of Honeywell products because I have easy access to those images, but there are other products that are included as well. The use of these images does not constitute an endorsement any of these products. I would also like to take this opportunity to acknowledge Mr. Nick Mayne of the Canterbury City Council in Kent, England, for providing me with some data from a study that I’ll be discussing. Additionally, portions of this presentation were previously presented at the 47th Conference of the Audio Engineering Society (AES), on Music-Induced Hearing Loss in 2012, as well as at the 38th Annual National Hearing Conservation Association (NHCA) Conference in 2013.

Background

In 1964, the Beatles came to the United States and performed at Shea Stadium. Few fans could hear them, and the Beatles could not hear themselves well because the audience was so loud. There was a problem with getting sound distributed over a crowd of screaming people that large. In the ensuing 10 years, we significantly advanced the technology of concert sound reinforcement.

When I was a senior in high school, I got a job at Tycobrahe Sound Company. They were contracted to provide the sound for a large festival show, second only to Woodstock at the time. So, in 1974, we did The California Jam. A magazine article covering this show touted 54,000 watts of audio power. We generated 105 dB SPL a mile away, and we were awed by such a great achievement. Can you imagine how loud it had to be in front of the speaker tower in order to measure 105 dB SPL at one mile down wind?  This is how I started my career.

Problem Statement

Hearing conservation has never been a part of the live entertainment culture, despite knowledge of the problems and risks. The entertainment industry knows there are some regulations, but those typically apply to brick-and-mortar industries, and entertainment does not know how to apply them in their own industry. Fortunately, we see this starting to change, and this is a good opportunity for audiologists to do something to help this industry.

Read More  . . .

 

Captioning for the ADA Live! Radio Show

October 24, 2013 in Advocacy & Access, Community News

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Captioning for the ADA Live! Radio Show

Here’s something we’re pleased to see: realtime captioning of a broadcast of ADA Live!  This radio program is by Southeast ADA Center, a member of the ADA National Network. It was developed under a grant from NIDRR.  There are live radio shows on the first Wednesday of each month from 1:00 to 1:30 pm (Eastern Time), and you can find past episodes with MP3 recording, a transcript, and resources.

The next program will be ehld on November 6, 2013. It is Episode 2: Beyond Yellow Ribbons: Veterans/Wounded Warriors and Their Return to Work.

To learn how to get this program, visit http://adalive.org/schedule.


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. You do not need permission to share this information, but please be sure to credit NVRC.  This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

Live De(a)f Poetry 2 Performances, April 4

April 3, 2013 in Community Events, Community News

Deaf poetry

Thursday, April 4, 2013 at 8:00pm

Mianba Productions with producers Michelle A. Banks and Richard D. Graham Jr. is proud to present In Sight and Sound: Live De(a)f Poetry II and it’s return due to popular demand, to bridge the gap between hearing and deaf communities as well as ethnic, political and lifestyle boundaries by bringing a unique and diverse group of artists together to perform their poetry about love, lifestyle, passion and politics in American Sign Language and spoken word with performances by Monifa Lemons-Jackson, Mervin Primeaux, Dyone Mitchell, E-Baby, Chad Willman, Jill Sege, Kavon Ward, Kosi, Kriston Pumphrey, Michelle Banks, Nat Plu, Richard Graham, Teraca Florence and Tricia Wenda Alleyne. The show also includes live dance performances by Ameena Dayo, ReVonte Bradley, Tara Miles and Wade Green. Music provided by the talented DJ SupaLee and hip hop performances by D.Wayz with Aarron Loggins and Prinz-D The First Deaf Rapper.

In Sight and Sound is more than a performance but an experience in Poetry, Dance and Music that you will have not seen before with a theatrical flair while interpretation for both deaf and hearing audience members in American Sign Language and spoken English. The mission of In Sight and Sound: Live De(a)f Poetry is to creatively bring together the Deaf and hearing worlds through visual and audio media entertainment.

Not recommended for children under 18

Get tickets to In Sight and Sound: Live De(a)f Poetry 2

http://atlasarts.org/events/2011/07/in-sight-and-sound-live-deaf-poetry-2-2/


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.