Law - Archive

Minnesota’s New Closed Captioning Law Takes Effect

August 4, 2016 in Captioning / Relay, Legislation

 

August 1, 2016
Commission of Deaf, DeafBlind & Hard of Hearing Minnesotans Bulletin

Good news!  Starting today, August 1st, Minnesota’s new closed captioning law goes into effect.  As of now, closed captioning is required to be kept on at all times in certain medical facilities.

The law applies to waiting rooms in hospitals, surgical centers, birth centers and some group homes.  The group homes affected are those that provide housing, meals and services to five or more people who are developmentally or physically disabled, chemically dependent or mentally ill.

Read more  . . . or view Signed/Captioned Video

New Hawaii law accommodates deaf and blind in movie theaters

May 7, 2015 in Advocacy & Access, Disability Law

 

 

Hawaii News Now
By HNN Staff
May 06, 2015 9:12 PM EDT

HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) – A bill signed into law on Wednesday by Governor David Ige will make Hawaii the first state in the nation to mandate accommodations for the hearing and visually impaired at movie theatres statewide.

HB1272 requires anyone that operates a motion picture theater in more than two locations in the state to provide open captioning during at least two showings per week of each motion picture that is produced with open movie captioning. It also requires them to provide an audio description of any motion picture that is produced and offered with audio description. The measure takes effect Jan. 1, 2016 and sunsets Jan. 1, 2018.

“This law makes Hawaii the first state in the nation to mandate broader accommodations to allow equal access to movie theaters for our deaf, blind, deaf/blind and hard-of-hearing communities,” said the bill’s introducer Rep. James Tokioka (Wailua Homesteads, Hanamaulu, Lihue, Puhi, Old Koloa Town, Omao).

Read More  . . .movie theaters

26-Year-Old Deaf-Blind Lawyer Sues Scribd For Alleged Discrimination

August 28, 2014 in Disability Law

 

Business Insider
COREY ADWAR
AUG. 20, 2014

A deaf-blind attorney who made Business Insider’s 2013 list of the 20 most impressive Harvard Law students is now fighting for the rights of blind readers in a lawsuit against digital subscription reading service Scribd, seeking equal access for the blind. 

Haben Girma made Business Insider’s 2013 list for her work advocating on behalf of people with disabilities. Now, at 26, she is continuing her efforts as a Skadden Fellowship Attorney with the nonprofit law firm Disability Rights Advocates. There, Girma is representing the National Federation of the Blind (NFB) and blind Vermont mother Heidi Viens in a lawsuit against Scribd for allegedly depriving blind readers access to its online services in violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/haben-girma-sues-scribd-2014-8

 

 

 
Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/haben-girma-sues-scribd-2014-8#ixzz3BhNLnPDi