interpreters - Archive

New Era Of Old Discrimination: How I Won A Pitch Competition

January 5, 2016 in Advocacy & Access, Community News, Interpreting & Transliterating

 

 

BuzzFeed
Posted on Jan. 4, 2016

When Deaf startup Aerial Productions won the International Drone Expo Pitch Competition, it served as a reminder that there is still a long way to go in overcoming barriers for the Deaf Community.

My late grandmother, who was Deaf, told me a story about when closed captions on TV first became available. She loved Westerns, and had spent most of her life watching them without any captions. She would always imagine the dialogue and the storylines as she watched them, filling in the breaks in action with her own mental scriptwriting. Years later, she watched some of her favorite episodes again with captions. To her surprise and disappointment, she found she didn’t like her shows as much. She thought the writing was superficial and the characters were nothing like she had imagined.

Access can be disappointing like that.

I recently had the opportunity to compete . . .  Read More – International Drone Expo Pitchfest

Call for Interpreters – PCRID Conference Nov. 7 – Nov. 8

October 22, 2015 in Community Events, Interpreting & Transliterating

 

Interpreters needed! 

The PCRID conference is just a few weeks away and we are looking for well-qualified interpreters to make the conference accessible to all.

Nov. 7 – Nov. 8, 2015
Embassy Suites,
Baltimore’s Inner Harbor.
222 St. Paul Place, Baltimore, MD, 21202.

Visit the website for more info and to apply!

Don’t want to interpret, but want to attend the conference?

Registration prices go up on Oct. 27th; don’t delay. Visit the website to register!

Deaf community lacks interpreters and support, advocates say

October 6, 2015 in Community News, Interpreting & Transliterating

 

Suggestions include four-year interpreter training and incentives for businesses.

October 2, 2015
By Caitlin McArthur
Capital News Service

LANSING, MI — Continued shortages of qualified interpreters and funding mean Michigan’s deaf, deafblind and hard of hearing residents lack access to proper communication and education, and many are unclear of their rights under state law, advocates say.

Michigan has a shortage of accessible mental health services, education, employment and legal services for these residents, said Todd Morrison, director of the Michigan Deaf Association.

About a million Michigan residents experience hearing loss, and about 90,000 identify as deaf. The majority consider themselves hard of hearing or later-deafened — meaning they were deafened after adolescence, having grown up as part of the hearing population, Morrison said.

But the state has only about 500 registered and certified hearing and sign language interpreters to assist this population. And 90 percent of those interpreters are self-employed, which means they can choose not to respond to emergency calls or work nights or weekends, Morrison said.

Read More . . . Interpreters

Let’s Talk (or Sign!) About the Deaf, Not Hearing Interpreters

June 11, 2015 in Hearing Loss & Deafness, Interpreting & Transliterating

 

 

Slate
By Caroline Zola
June10,2015

A few days ago, a good friend and fellow linguaphile posted a video on my Facebook wall of Shelby Mitchusson, a hearing American Sign Language (ASL) interpreter translating Eminem’s anthemic “Lose Yourself,” signing with dramatic facial expression and full body motion as she attempts to convey the essence of Slim Shady. The video now has more than 3 million views.

In the fall of 2013, Amber Galloway Gallego became a YouTube sensation after video of her signing a Kendrick Lamar concert also garnered millions of views. Countless articles (here, herehere, and here, to cite a few) lauded Gallego’s signing as “epic” and called her “a true inspiration.” Of course, what she’s doing is a service to the Deaf community. Music is something that all people, regardless of their hearing status, should be able to appreciate and understand, and to convey the rhythm and spirit of Kendrick Lamar into a form of expression the deaf and hard of hearing can process is inherently valuable. Mitchusson and Gallego went viral because their videos are not simply a detached interpretation. They’re excitingly interpretive.

But what are we really doing when we label ASL with words like “epic” or “cool”? We are exoticizing and trivializing it. ASL (and all sign languages—remember, there isn’t just one!) is a language every bit as much as English, with its own rules of grammar, its own syntax, morphology, phonology, and semantics. It is not “cool” or “interesting” or “awesome,” but rather a practical and evolving way of communicating that deserves as much respect as any spoken language. To share a video of someone signing with the caption “look how cool this is!” perpetuates the misconception that sign languages are somehow different, a kind of sideshow novelty at which to marvel.

Read more . . . view video, picture . . . .

 

 

 

DAS and VRID Presents: 50 Shades of Health & Sexuality Education

June 3, 2015 in Interpreting & Transliterating

 

For Interpreters
By Emily Claveau M.S. Ed., CDI
June 13th — 9am to 4pm — $75 — 0.6 CEUs
DoubleTree by Hilton in Silver Spring, MD
For more info contact: development@deafaccess.com

WRAP for Interpreters Workshop – Aug 15-16th

July 29, 2014 in Community Events, Interpreting & Transliterating

 

POSTPONED (will be rescheduled)

WRAP is the Wellness Recovery Action Plan that can be utilized to maintain physical and mental wellness.  Interpreters can develop their own plan to keep themselves physically and mentally well in their professional and personal lives.  Self-monitoring is a large aspect of WRAP and being able to identify things such as fatigue (mental and physical), compassion fatigue, and other signs of negative symptoms you might experience can prevent them from becoming overwhelming.

The workshop will be led by CW Tillman and Beth Klein and will be held at NVRC, 3951 Pender Ave, Fairfax, VA 22030.  It will be held on August 15 from 6 pm – 9 pm and August 16th from 9 am – 5 pm.  Lunch and snacks will be provided. 1.0 CEU’s are offered and sponsored by VRID.

Early bird registration is $90 and is through August 1st. 

After August 1st regular registration is $100. 

WRAP will be taught in spoken English. 

Learn more and register today at: http://www.pahdeaf.org/?p=12

For more information or to request accommodations before August 1st email CW Tillman at info@pahdeaf.org.

NCIEC Deaf Self-Advocacy Webinar January 14

December 17, 2012 in Advocacy & Access, Education & Outreach, Interpreting & Transliterating

NCIEC

We are forwarding information from the National Interpreter Education Center. 

Please direct all questions about this program to Crystal Eusebio, at c.eusebio@neu.edu.

 Deaf Self-Advocacy Training webinar

The Importance of Deaf Self-Advocacy Training: New Second Edition Curriculum Overview

Read more . . . →

Shane H. Feldman Named New Executive Director of the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf, Inc.

November 30, 2012 in Community News, Interpreting & Transliterating

Nation’s largest sign language interpreting organization selects a nationally-recognized Deaf community leader 
and staunch advocate with outstanding nonprofit organizational leadership.

 See RID President Brenda Walker Prudhom’s signed video announcement here>>   


http://www.youtube.com/RIDOfficialChannel

Alexandria, VA – November 29, 2012 – The Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf, Inc. (RID) today announced the appointment of Shane H. Feldman as its new executive director. Feldman, a nationally-recognized Deaf community leader, advocate and nonprofit professional, has been instrumental in advancing the rights of the community at the local, state and national levels including the right to qualified sign language interpreting services. Starting January 1, 2013, Feldman is responsible for the ongoing and consistent achievement of RID’s Strategic Plan and for the implementation and completion of initiatives set forth by a board of directors and the association members. Read more . . . →

NVRC Fact Sheets

July 5, 2011 in Education & Outreach

NVRC Fact Sheets are downloadable PDF documents. 

Hearing Loss

Hearing Aids

Caregivers and Parent Resources

Hearing Dogs

Cochlear Implants

Assistive Listening Devices and Technology

How to File a Closed Captioned Complaint

Interpreters and Transliterators

The following Tip Sheets are from the ADA Information Center:
           www.adainfo.org and the DOJ’s ADA website:

The following Standard Practice Papers are from the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf (RID):

Technology Fact Sheets

Phones

  •  Ameriphone VCO
  • CapTel Phone
  • Clarity Cordless Phones
  • Crystal Tone Phone

Signaling Devices

  • Alert Master Combination 
  • Baby Crying Signaler
  • Ringmax Amplified Ringer
  • Shake Awake Vibrating Alarm Clock
  • Smoke Alarms
  • Sonic Alert Door Bell Signaler
  • Sonic Boom Alarm Clock and Bed Shaker

Amplifiers

  •  In-Line Amplifier for Phones
  • Portable Telephone Amplifiers
  • UniVox 2A+ Home Cushion Loop Amplifier 
  • PockeTalker

Music and Television

  • Music Link
  • Music Link Dual
  • Neck Loop and T-Links
  • Television Devices

TTY Devices

  • TTY Ultratec Superprint
  • Uniphone TTY and Amplified Phone

Loan2Own Program

 

Cued Speech

March 29, 2011 in Interpreting & Transliterating

Cued Speech is a mode of communication based on the phonemes and properties of traditionally spoken languages. Cueing allows users who are deaf or hard of hearing or who have language/communication disorders to access the basic, fundamental properties of spoken languages through the use of vision.(taken from the National Cued Speech Association’s website)    

Below is a list of local Cued Speech Transliterators who provide services in the metro DC area:

Ashley Elder
Email: ashrenee85@gmail.com
Phone: (571) 318-3491

Nichelle Wilson
Email: mrs_njwilson@yahoo.com
Phone: (571) 426-3747



National Cued Speech Association Logo

National Cued Speech Association
5619 McLean Drive
Bethesda, MD 20814-1021

Toll Free: 800-459-3529
Local: 301-915-8009
Email: info@cuedspeech.org