implants - Archive

Everything you should know about Cochlear Implants – Sun Sept 25

September 8, 2016 in Community News

HLAA_DC

What are they? What do they do? Who is a candidate? And are they something you, or a friend or family member should consider? Come learn from our distinguished speakers.

Please open the attachment for program details.  Also please note that we are asking for an RSVP anticipating that there is likely to be wide interest in this program.

Sunday, September 25 @ 2 – 4 PM

DC Public Library at Tenleytown/large meeting room 4450 Wisconsin Ave NW, Washington, D.C.
(less than a block from Tenleytown Metro Station/Red Line) Nearby on-street parking

DOWNLOAD PROGRAM FLYER on CI’s

 

Two ears are better than one

August 1, 2014 in Hearing Loss & Deafness, Research

 

 

Medical Press, Australia
by Anne Rahilly
Article Source

Hearing-impaired children fitted with a second cochlear implant (CI) early in life, have significantly better outcomes in aspects of their communication and learning.

A five-year research study from the University of Melbourne shows that bilateral  implantation resulted in improved language, social development, and academic outcomes for children.

Lead researcher, Dr Julia Sarant from the Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology said there are improved learning outcomes as well as, community cost benefits and greatly improved quality of life for hearing-impaired children.

“Children in this study with bilateral CIs developed vocabulary and spoken language significantly faster than children with only one CI. This has enormous implications for their long-term future,” she said.

Severe-profound congenital hearing loss is a significant cost to society. In 2005, specialised education cost on average $25,000 per child, loss of productivity cost $6.7 billion, and social security benefits were paid to approximately 129,000 individuals who were unemployed due to hearing loss

The study was conducted across Victoria, NSW, Qld, SA, and New Zealand, involving cochlear implant clinics and early intervention centres with over 160 children.

Recently, the NZ Health Department recommended a change of the current federal funding policy in favour of having all hearing-impaired  under the age of six years fitted with bilateral implants.

“I was asked to consult with policy makers in NZ and I am pleased they have noted these findings and made the appropriate changes,” said Dr Sarant.

 

Mom’s Support Helps Language Development of Children with Hearing Loss

April 1, 2013 in Community News, Families, Research

 

Moms’ Sensitivity Helps Language Development in Children with Hearing Loss


From University of Miami 3/26/2013
www.miami.edu 

Children with cochlear implants who receive positive and emotional support from their mothers develop language skills at a faster rate, almost “catching up” to children with normal hearing, according to a study by a University of Miami psychologist.

“I was surprised that maternal sensitivity had such strong and consistent effects on oral language learning,” said Alexandra L. Quittner, lead investigator of the study and director of the Child Division in the Department of Psychology in UM’s College of Arts and Sciences. The results of study, one of the largest and most representative on the effects of parenting on young deaf children who wear cochlear implants, are published in the Journal of Pediatrics.

“The findings indicate that pediatric cochlear implant programs should offer parent training that facilitates a more positive parent-child relationship and fosters the child’s development of autonomy and positive regard,” Quittner said.

Her study investigated the role of parental behavior in language growth for deaf children. Maternal sensitivity was measured in videotaped interactions with the child and defined as the degree to which a mother expressed positive regard and emotional support of the child.

The study included 188 children, ages five months to 5 years of age, with severe to profound hearing loss. In addition to analyzing the effects of maternal sensitivity on language development, the study also looks at the impact of cognitive and language stimulation. Parent-child interactions observed and coded included free play, puzzle solving, and an art gallery task with five posters mounted at different heights on the walls of the playroom.

The largest improvements in language development were observed in children whose parents displayed high sensitivity; Language stimulation was also an important predictor of language gains but was most effective when delivered in a sensitive manner. Deaf children with sensitive parents had only a 1 year delay in oral language compared to. 2.5 years among those with less sensitive parents.

Read the rest of the story at: http://www.miami.edu/index.php/news/releases/moms_sensitivity_helps_language_development_in_children_with_hearing_loss/


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

When brain implants arrive, will we still be “us”?

November 28, 2012 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness

By Reena Jana, Smartplanet 11/19/2012
Read the full story at: http://www.smartplanet.com/blog/bulletin/when-brain-implants-arrive-will-we-still-be-8220us-8221/6102

What happens when non-biological implants in our bodies — along the lines of cochlear implants to improve hearing in the deaf — include brain-related devices that might enhance our memories? Will we still be “us”? Will we be more of a cyborg than we were if, say, we had another type of implant? And for those who believe we would not be, at what point do we lose our selves to a more machine-like incarnation? When do we stop being human?   Read more . . . →