Help - Archive

Help Wanted for Sign Language Camp

June 16, 2016 in Community News

 

Wanted: Assistant Cabin Counselor
For a week of learning, inspiration and fun!
and Camping for All!

We are looking for Bilingual males (fluent in ASL and English communication) to volunteer as assistant cabin counselors for our eighth annual Sign Language Camp  July 17- July 22, 2016.  The program joins Deaf and hard of hearing children with their hearing peers for a week of sharing of ASL and deaf culture, along with typical camp activities.

DOWNLOAD – Bilingual_Male_staff_2016_flyer

If you’re interested in helping at camp that week, please contact Deb Shapiro of Camping for All at camping4all@earthlink.net or 434-806-8835.

 

Don’t Focus on Your Tinnitus – by Neil Bauman, Ph.D.

January 19, 2016 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

Center for Hearing Loss Help
by Neil Bauman, Ph.D.
January 3, 2016

If you have tinnitus you need to stop focusing on your tinnitus. Constantly and repetitiously mulling over your tinnitus will only make your tinnitus worse. Therefore, you need to consciously choose notto dwell on it.

Instead, focus on living a happy productive life. Get involved in fun activities, productive projects, and the loves of your life. When you are thoroughly wrapped up in something that is exciting or enticing to you, your tinnitus will not be important enough for your brain to even bother decoding it.

As I have said numerous times to people with tinnitus, “Did you ever notice that when you are passionately kissing your spouse, you don’t hear your tinnitus?” They all get a surprised look on their faces, followed by a knowing look as they realize this is true.

Read more  . . . Tinnitus

The top of my do-over list includes showing my ears a little love

September 17, 2014 in Community News

 

 — or at least some respect

Deseret News

Posted:
 September 9, 2014
Updated: September 10, 2014

Sitting quietly beside my daughter on an old stump in a canyon where we’d gone rambling recently, I listened with joy to the warble of a bird and the babble of the water nearby.

One of my great pleasures is the fact that those sounds — and the ticking of a watch — are unimpaired by a pretty devastating hearing loss. If you’re going to be left with remnants, those are lovely.

Then my teenager spoke, the words mostly unintelligible, and I was reminded of precisely how much I have given up with decades of casual disregard for my ears. The fact that my hearing loss is most likely self-inflicted just increases the misery.

If you have kids, pay attention and talk to them about this early and often. Because hearing aids are a lovely tool and I am very grateful for mine. But this is one do-over I’d embrace in a heartbeat, were it possible. Artificial hearing cannot compare with the real thing. If you’ve got it, take care of it.

I didn’t.

When I was in high school, I went to a ton of football games to root for good old Idaho Falls High. Screaming, it seems, was not optional. Hearing protection should not have been, either.

A few years later, as a young reporter, I reviewed concerts. And for at least a decade, it never occurred to me that I could hear the concert pretty much unimpaired even if I wore ear plugs, which would have been a dandy notion. The most I’d have lost is some of the shrill shrieks and whistles that are so many audiences’ contribution to a musical occasion.

Read More  . . .