Hearing Aids - Archive

Rate of hearing loss increases significantly after age 90

September 22, 2016 in Hearing Aids, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

Hearing aids underused, say authors

Science Daily
Date:
September 19, 2016
Source:
JAMA
Summary:
A new study examined if the rate of age-related hearing loss is constant in the older old (80 years and older). Scientists concluded that hearing loss rapidly accelerates over the age of 90. Furthermore, authors suggest that hearing aids are underused in this population.
In a study published online by JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Anil K. Lalwani, M.D., of the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, and colleagues examined if the rate of age-related hearing loss is constant in the older old (80 years and older).
Read more  . . . hearing loss  . . . after age 90

Keeping Your Hearing Aids Safe

May 31, 2016 in Community News

 

 

Flagstaff Business News
By Dr. Karon Lynn, Au.D.
May 30, 2016

The most common call to my office for lost hearing aids is that the individual was in the hospital or rehabilitation facility when the hearing aids were lost. Another common place to lose hearing aids is in a test situation, such as having an MRI, an outpatient procedure or other situation that requires you to remove hearing aids at a facility.

You need to wear the hearing aids prior to testing because you want to hear what is being said. Decisions are being made creating an element of stress surrounding any procedure done in a medical facility. I have heard people say that they leave their hearing aids at home so they do not have to worry about them being lost. I propose another idea.

Read more  . . . Hearing Aids Safe

Are hearing aids taboo?

May 10, 2016 in Community News, Hearing Aids, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

Examiner.com
LIFE | HEALTH & FITNESS | HEALTHCARE
May 9, 2016

 

Why is there such a stigma about hearing loss? Are hearing aids taboo? One in 3 people between the ages of 65 and 74 suffer from presbycusis; the slow loss of hearing as we age. The National Council on Aging suggests that those who do not wear hearing aids are 50% more likely to experience depression, anxiety, paranoia and balance issues and less likely to participate in organized social activities, compared to those who wear hearing aids. A new research from Johns Hopkins University shows that hearing loss may increase your risk of developing dementia. Several studies have shown that those with untreated hearing loss are 3 times more likely to suffer falls than those without.

So why are there such a low percentage of seniors being tested? The average amount of time between noticing hearing loss and seeking treatment is 10 years. The Hearing Loss Association of America (HLAA) believes that the cost of hearing aids is one factor.

Read more  . . . Hearing Aids

New State Program To Aid Deaf And Hard Of Hearing Children

March 15, 2016 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

WBIW.com
March 15, 2016

(INDIANAPOLIS) – The Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Education (CDHHE) at the Indiana State Department of Health is introducing a new program to help children who are deaf or hard of hearing obtain hearing aids. The program will be administered by Hear Indiana.

The Hearing Aid Assistance Program of Indiana (HAAPI) will support children who are deaf or hard of hearing by providing hearing aids for those who desire this assistive technology. The program was created because most private insurance carriers do not cover the cost of hearing aids, which can cost as much as $6,000 a pair. Many Hoosier families cannot afford to purchase this technology, let alone update their child’s hearing technology every three to five years, as recommended.

Read more  . . .CDHHE Indianapolis

Access to hearing aids could help fight dementia, says doctor

February 25, 2016 in Hearing Aids, Hearing Loss & Deafness, Technology

 

Physician Frank Lin says treating hearing loss could help fight cognitive decline as he estimates 36% of dementia risk linked to hearing impairment

The Guardian News 
Sunday 14 February 2016

Hearing loss contributes to dementia and mental decline, according to new medical research by a doctor who plans to begin the first clinical trial to study whether hearing aids could prevent or mitigate brain decline.

On Sunday physician Frank Lin described his research at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in Washington DC.

“I’m asking how can our peripheral functions, namely hearing, affect our central functions – our brain,” he asked. “Unfortunately this question is completely unknown. This trial has never been done.”

Lin said the prevalence of hearing loss doubles for every decade of life, and that its high frequency has led physicians to dismiss it too often. “The vast majority of dementias in late life are multifactorial,” he said, “but the role of hearing loss has just not been studied.”

Read more  . . . dementia

Hearing Aid Reviews – Real Consumer Feedback

February 11, 2016 in Hearing Aids

 


by  – Hearing Aids.

Searching for genuine consumer-generated hearing aid reviews online can be frustrating.  Just try Googling “hearing aid reviews” sometime – if you haven’t already. You’ll find a number of hearing aid “buying guides,” from the likes of AARP, Mayo Clinic, Consumer Affairs, and more. While we highly recommend familiarizing yourself with a reputable buying guide before purchasing hearing aids, we’re also disappointed with Google’s poor delivery. Where are the hearing aid reviews?

Before moving on to a thorough discussion of Hearing Tracker’s consumer reviews, we’d like to take a moment to further inspect Google’s top 10 results for “hearing aid reviews” (collected in January, 2016). The way we see it, the lack of relevant results is only part of the problem; only a handful of these links lead to independent, unbiased resources.

Read more  . . . Hearing Aid reviews

Apple Urges FCC To Recognize Made for iPhone Hearing Aids

February 1, 2016 in Hearing Aids, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 


By Chance Miller

Apple recently has filed a new document with the Federal Communications Commission in which it argues that Made for iPhone, or MFi, accessories should be acknowledged by the organization as alternatives for hearing aid compatibility compliance. Recently, the FCC has proposed that all phones and consumer wireless devices must be compatible with hearing aids.

In response to the new proposal from the FCC, Apple says that all products that fall under its MFi hearing aid standards already comply with the FCC’s hearing aid compliance regulations. Apple argues that Made for iPhone hearing aids are already available to consumers everywhere, thus making them a valid alternative to the hearing aid compatibility requirement (via MacReports).

Read more  . . . Apple

Other Related Links
See FCC Filling by APPLE
Apple urges FCC to spike rules for universal compliance with hearing aids
Apple asks FCC to have its Made for iPhone accessories recognized as hearing aid alternatives

America must confront hearing loss: Column

January 8, 2016 in Hearing Aids, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

USA TODAY
Dave Fabry
December 14, 2015

Scientists link hearing loss to decreased cognition, depression and learning disorders, but CDC doesn’t give it attention it deserves.

The United States is approaching a tipping point in terms of hearing loss and how it is treated under current policy. In recent years, science has discovered an increasingly pronounced association between a decline in cognition and hearing loss, yet this is not regarded with the same urgency as many other conditions.

The most recent evidence comes from a new French study that tracked 3,670 patients over the age of 65 for 25 years, comparing decreases in cognition among people with normal hearing and those with self-reported hearing loss; some used hearing aids while others did not.

Read More  . . . Hearing Aid Stigma

FDA is extending public comment time for Hearing aids

January 8, 2016 in Hearing Aids, Legislation, Technology

 

The Hill
By Tim Devaney – 01/06/16

Hearing aids: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is delaying new guidelines for hearing aids.

The FDA issued draft guidance for “hearing aid devices and personal sound amplification products” in 2013 but is now reopening the comment period to give the public more time to discuss.

The public has 120 days to comment.

Source The Hill

The FDA engages stakeholders on opportunities to improve hearing aid usage and innovation

January 7, 2016 in Advocacy & Access, Hearing Aids

 

For Immediate Release

January 6, 2016

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today announced new efforts to better understand how the agency can appropriately balance patient safety while encouraging advancements in hearing aid technology and access to these devices in the United States. The FDA will convene stakeholders for a public workshop and has re-opened a public comment period on a draft guidance related to the agency’s premarket requirements for hearing aids and personal sound amplification products (PSAPs).

According to statistics compiled by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD), 37.5 million adults aged 18 and older in America report some form of hearing loss. However, only 30 percent of adults aged 70 and older and 16 percent of adults aged 20 to 69 who could benefit from wearing hearing aids have ever used them. NIDCD is part of the National Institutes of Health.

“The FDA recognizes that hearing aids are an important and often underutilized medical device for those with hearing impairment,” said William Maisel, M.D., M.P.H., acting director of the Office of Device Evaluation in the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health. “Additional insight from all stakeholders will help us to better understand how we can overcome the barriers to access and spur the development of devices that compensate for impaired hearing.”

Read entire FDA Press Release

Breaking the Stigma of Hearing Loss – The Who, What, Why and How

December 11, 2015 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

We must break the stigma that surrounds hearing loss. It is a matter of life and mind — your mind. Research shows that people with a mild hearing loss are twice as likely to develop dementia as those with normal hearing, and this risk increases with the severity of the hearing loss. Over a six-year study at Johns Hopkins, the cognitive abilities of older adults with hearing loss declined 30%-40% faster than in older adults whose hearing was normal and developed a significant impairment in their cognitive abilities 3.2 years sooner than those with typical hearing. Hearing loss is also associated with higher incidence of heart disease, diabetes, and depression.

WHO has hearing loss?

Hearing loss is not an isolated incident. Fifty million Americans have hearing loss today. This includes 1 in 5 teenagers, and 60% of our returning veterans from foreign wars. In fact, more people have hearing loss, than suffer from diabetes, Alzheimer’s, autism and osteoporosis combined! Nevertheless, it does not seem to be a priority within the national healthcare dialogue. Maybe it is because hearing loss does not kill you. It is true that it is not fatal, but it can take away the quality of your life, through isolation, depression and the early onset of dementia, along with other health problems.

Read more . . . . Sheri Eberts- A Hearing Loss Blog

PCAST Recommends Changes to Promote Innovation in Hearing Technologies

November 18, 2015 in Hearing Loss & Deafness, Technology

 

 

OCTOBER 26, 2015
BY CHRISTINE CASSEL AND ED PENHOET

Summary:
President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology letter report investigated age-related mild to moderate hearing loss.

Untreated, age-related hearing loss is a significant national problem. With the population 65 and older in the United States expected to reach 80 million in the next 25 years, the number of people with hearing loss will rise dramatically. Already, a quarter of adults between 60 and 69 years, more than half of adults between 70 and 79 years, and almost 80 percent of those older than 80 years have difficulty hearing – that’s almost 30 million Americans. Only a small fraction of this group seek out and use assistive hearing technologies, including hearing aids, and that rate is even smaller among low income and racial and ethnic minorities.

The President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) believes there is an opportunity to enhance the pace of innovation, decrease cost, and improve the capability, convenience, and use of assistive hearing devices for individuals whose hearing has diminished in a mild to moderate way with age. Today, we delivered a letter report to the President, Aging America & Hearing Loss: Imperative of Improved Hearing Technologies, that examines these issues and includes several recommendations as part of our larger study about how technologies can help Americans remain independent as they age.

Read entire Summary

Read Full report (pdf)

Study: Hearing Aids May Help Protect Brain Health

November 17, 2015 in Community News

 

 

AARP – Health Talk
by Katherine Bouton
11/11/2015

For several years, studies have linked hearing loss and dementia, but no major study has addressed the big question: Could using hearing aidsreduce the risk of cognitive decline?

Now an important new French studyfinds that older adults who use hearing aids experience the same rate of cognitive decline as their peers with normal hearing. In other words, while hearing loss is associated with accelerated cognitive decline, hearing aids can slow that from happening, researchers say.

The study, published online last month in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, followed nearly 3,700 adults age 65 and older for 25 years,

 

Read more  . . . Brain Health

Over-The-Counter Hearing Aids Controversy

November 17, 2015 in Hearing Loss & Deafness, Technology

 

 


by 

In October 2015, the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) delivered Aging America & Hearing Loss: Imperative of Improved Hearing Technologies, which targets America’s worsening hearing loss epidemic. The report proposes a number of regulatory changes, at the level of the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which PCAST believes will “decrease the cost of hearing aids, spur technology innovation, and increase consumer choice options.”

One of the most controversial proposals is the creation of a new category of “basic” category of hearing aids meant for over-the-counter sale. PCAST argues that this “would allow entrepreneurs and innovators to enter the market and open a space for creative solutions to improve mild-to-moderate, age-related hearing loss with devices that can be sold ( . . . ) at the local pharmacy, online, or at a retail store for significantly less.”

Read more  . . . Hearing Aids Controversy

FCC Moves to Increase Hearing Aid Compatibility

November 17, 2015 in Technology

 

 

TDI
Nov 4, 2015

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has a longstanding commitment to ensuring that Americans with hearing loss are able to access wireline and wireless communications services through a wide array of phones, including voice-over-Internet protocol (VoIP) telephones and wireless handsets that use advanced mobile technologies. The Commission’s actions in this area have helped enable the millions of Americans with hearing loss to have greater access to and more fully benefit from wireline and wireless communications services and emerging technologies.

In FCC’s Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM), they propose to amend the Commission’s hearing aid compatibility (HAC) rules for wireline handsets. Specifically, they propose to take the following actions:

(1) incorporate into the rules a revised industry standard developed by the Telecommunications Industry Association (TIA) – ANSI/TIA-4965-2012 (2012 ANSI Wireline Volume Control Standard) – that appears likely to improve the ability of people with hearing loss to select wireline telephones with sufficient volume control to meet their communication needs and provide greater regulatory certainty for the industry; and