Google - Archive

Google Awards TDI Two-Year Grant for Project in Web-Based Captioning Services

April 12, 2016 in Community News

 

TDI Website
Apr 12, 2016

Millions of Individuals Who Are Deaf and Hard of Hearing Stand to Benefit from Highly-Accurate, Low-Cost, Captioning Services

Telecommunications for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, Inc. (TDI), is pleased to announce its receipt of Google’s $500,000 Impact Challenge/Disabilities two-year grant for a project to create scalable access to affordable, accessible, and accurate captions for any live event by combining available speech-to-text technology with real-time caption corrections made by event-designated peers in addition to caption streaming via the internet.

Read more . . . 

Google Impact Challenge: Disabilities

June 1, 2015 in Technology

 

 

Google.org is looking for your biggest and best ideas for how technology can expand opportunity and independence for people with disabilities.  Google is committing USD 20 million in grant funding toward this goal, some of which may be awarded to organizations identified through this call for ideas.  Ideas will be evaluated on a rolling basis, so you are encouraged to submit whenever you are ready.  Ideas will be accepted until September 30, 2015 at 2:00 pm, Pacific Daylight Time.  For more information visit the link: g.co/OpenCallDisabilities.

Can Digital Devices Replace Interpreters? by Lydia L. Callis

July 31, 2014 in Interpreting & Transliterating, Technology

 

 

Huffington Post
The Blog

Lydia L. Callis
Sign Language Interpreter, Community Educator, Advocate

Article Source

While walking the streets of New York, nearly every person I see is staring down at a screen, fully engaged with a digital device. Through technology, our world has become incredibly connected; yet disconnected at the same time. There is comfort in being able to communicate without regard to time or distance but somehow all this personal contact seems so impersonal, so two dimensional, so unnatural… Are we all truly eager to replace all human interaction with virtual realities?

Last week, the Internet was buzzing with news of a new device called Google Gesture, a wristband which could reportedly translate sign language into spoken language in real time. The viral clip turned out to be just a concept video released by a group of marketing students in Sweden, but it stirred up some interesting discussions about the role of technology in cross-cultural communication.

Although most deaf/HoH are content with their lives the way they are, it’s nice to imagine a world where everyone is able to communicate seamlessly, and deaf people are not excluded from certain spaces. Over the past 30 years, technology has been viewed as a solution to provide deaf individuals  . . .

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CSUN Students’ Phone App Alert System wins Competition

March 14, 2013 in Community News, Technology

By Dana Bartholomew, Staff Writerdailynews.com, 3/12/2013
http://www.dailynews.com/news/ci_22775184/deaf-alert

A team of Cal State Northridge computer hotshots licked top universities throughout the region at a software competition last weekend by designing a winning phone app alert system for the deaf.

The CSUN computer science students clinched the “SS12: Code for a Cause” contest in San Diego, thumping teams from USC and UCLA.

With only two weeks to design their software, the team of five students concocted an Android application that can interpret audio disturbances such as sirens, smoke alarms, car horns or even crying children, then translate them into flashing lights,vibrations and texts to those who could not otherwise hear them. The free app is now available at Google Play.

Read more . . . →

Captioning YouTube Videos

June 3, 2011 in Advocacy & Access, Technology

Did you know that you can caption your own videos on YouTube?  It’s true!You can find information on adding and editing captions or subtitles to your videos in YouTube’s Help articles, under Uploading > Editing Videos > Learn More.

You can get software to caption or subtitle your own videos, or get a captioning company to do it for you.

Once your video has captions, you can turn them on or off by clicking on the CC button on the video viewer.

You can also use the Transcribe Audio feature to have YouTube generate the captions for a video you are watching. 

This uses an experimental speech recognition software to generate the captions.  Be aware that the quality of the Transcribe Audio captions can be affected by such things as background music in the video, wind blowing across the microphone, and how clearly the speaker enunciates.

You can also have YouTube translate the captions into other languages!

Take some time to try adding captions to your videos, and let us know what you think!  The more captioning we have for online videos, the better things are for everyone.

YouTube Captioning Resources

Can I get help captioning or subtitling my video?

How to create captions and subtitles on YouTube

Adding and Editing captions / subtitles

Viewing videos with captions