Fair - Archive

EVENT CANCELED – 4th Winchester CRAFT & VENDORS FAIR

September 16, 2015 in Community News

EVENT CANCELED

Come be a part of the 4th Fair!
CRAFT & VENDORS FAIR

Saturday Oct 17th, 2015

10AM – 5 PM

APPLE BLOSSOM MALL (Indoors!) 1850 Apple Blossom Drive, Winchester, VA 22601
Funds to support Sign language Organization (SLO) & Access Independence Deaf Outreach Services

For directions to Vendors’ Fair, visit: www.accessindependence.org
or calI 540-931-9124
Contact Donna Day: dday@accessindependence.org

DOWNLOAD-2015_craft_fair_flyer

 

DEAF AND THOSE WHO USE WHEELCHAIRS FACE ADDED DISCRIMINATION IN RENTAL HOUSING MARKET

July 2, 2015 in Advocacy & Access, Research

 

 

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development – Julián Castro, Secretary
Office of Public Affairs, Washington, DC 20410
HUD No. 15-081                                                                                             FOR RELEASE
Elena Gaona                                                                                                   Thursday
202-708-0685                                                                                                  June 25, 2015
http://www.hud.gov/news/index.cfm


DEAF AND THOSE WHO USE WHEELCHAIRS
FACE ADDED DISCRIMINATION IN RENTAL HOUSING MARKET

National study finds deaf, hard of hearing, and those in wheelchairs told about fewer homes

WASHINGTON – Well-qualified homeseekers who are deaf or hard of hearing, as well as homeseekers who use wheelchairs, are told about fewer available housing units than comparable homeseekers who can hear and walk, according to a new study released today by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and the Urban Institute.  Discrimination in the Rental Housing Market Against People Who Are Deaf and People Who Use Wheelchairs finds that people who are deaf or who use wheelchairs are at a statistically significant disadvantage when it comes to the number of homes they are informed about.

“Every American deserves the opportunity to secure a home,” said HUD Secretary Julián Castro.  “But the evidence is clear: people who are hearing-impaired or in wheelchairs face unacceptable and unjust discrimination.  HUD will continue to work with our fair housing partners to protect the rights of Americans with disabilities and to promote opportunity for all.”

Key findings of the report include:

Discrimination against people who are deaf or hard of hearing

  • When well-qualified homeseekers who are deaf or hard of hearing contact housing providers and use assistive communication technologies to inquire about recently advertised rental housing, providers are less likely to respond to their inquiries.
  • The extent of apparent discrimination against people who are deaf or hard of hearing varies with the type of communication technology the deaf or hard of hearing tester uses to make contact with housing providers. Housing providers are more resistant to dealing with the older (but still widely used) telephone technologies which have longer communication delays.
  • When they do respond, the housing providers tell homeseekers who are deaf or hard of hearing about fewer available housing options than they tell comparable homeseekers who are hearing.

Discrimination against people who use wheelchairs

  • Well-qualified homeseekers who use wheelchairs are more likely to be denied an appointment to view recently advertised rental housing in buildings with accessible units than comparably qualified homeseekers who are ambulatory.
  • Those who do receive an appointment are less likely than their ambulatory counterparts to be told about and shown suitable housing units.
  •  When homeseekers who use a wheelchair ask about modifications that would make the available housing more accessible to them, housing providers agree in most instances. However in approximately a quarter of the requests, housing providers either failed to provide a clear response or explicitly denied modification requests.

The Urban Institute, which conducted the study, employed a “paired testing” methodology in which researchers compared the treatment of persons who are deaf or hard of hearing, and those who are wheelchair bound, against those who can hear and not wheelchair bound. The paired testing track for people who were deaf or hard of hearing included 1,665 remote telephone tests conducted in a national sample of 168 metropolitan areas that contained more than four-fifths (82%)of the population that is deaf or hard of hearing and that resides in rental housing. The national sample for people who use wheelchairs included 1,259 tests in 30 metropolitan areas containing almost three-quarters (73%) of the population that has a mobility disability and that resides in rental housing.

The Fair Housing Act prohibits discrimination against persons with disabilities.  Discrimination complaints made on the basis of physical and mental disabilities have increased over time to become the largest share of complaints received by federal and local agencies and private fair housing organizations. In FY 2014, disability was the most common basis of complaints filed with HUD and its partner agencies, being cited as a basis for 4,606 complaints, or 54 percent of the overall total.

Persons who believe they have experienced discrimination may file a complaint by contacting HUD’s Office of Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity at (800) 669-9777 (voice) or (800) 927-9275 (TTY). Housing discrimination complaints may also be filed by going to www.hud.gov/fairhousing, or by downloading HUD’s free housing discrimination mobile application, which can be accessed through Apple devices, such as iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch, as well as Android devices.

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HUD’s mission is to create strong, sustainable, inclusive communities and quality affordable homes for all.
More information about HUD and its programs is available on the Internet
at 
www.hud.gov and http://espanol.hud.gov.

 

DISCRIMINATION IN THE RENTAL HOUSING MARKET AGAINST PEOPLE WHO ARE DEAF AND PEOPLE WHOUSE WHEELCHAIRS:  NATIONAL STUDY FINDINGS
DOWNLOAD HUD PDF COMPLETE REPORT 

 

Fair Housing Videos for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing

February 11, 2014 in Community News, Disability Law

FairHousing

 

 

 

 

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development is pleased to announce the creation of 12 videos in American Sign Language (ASL) with English captioning.  These videos provide critical legal and practical information in a format accessible to persons who are Deaf and/or Hard of Hearing.

These videos feature Deaf and/or Hard of Hearing Actors who provide important information related to fair housing and fair lending rights under the federal Fair Housing Act.

Due to their short length, these videos do not provide complete information about rights and responsibilities under fair housing laws.  If you believe you may have experienced discrimination, please contact one of the organizations identified at the end of this video.

HUD would like to thank the Disability Independence Group and the National Fair Housing Alliance for the production of these videos.

CLICK HERE to view video:  www.fairhousingdeafvideos.com