Emergency Preparedness - Archive

Fairfax County’s ‘Yellow Dot’ Program Could Save Your Life

September 27, 2016 in Community News, Emergency Preparedness, Hearing Loss & Deafness, Transportation

 

 

There’s a “golden hour” after a vehicle crash or emergency.

Medical help may be required, but first responders need to know what medical conditions people might have, especially if they are unconscious or unable to talk.

The Fairfax County Fire and Rescue Department’s new “Yellow Dot Program” could save your life, and enrollment is simple:

  1. Visit your local fire station for a kit.
  2. Fill out the booklet in pencil (so you can make future updates).
  3. Attach a current photo into the booklet.
  4. Place the booklet in your glove compartment.
  5. Place the yellow dot decal in the lower left of your rear windshield to alert first responders to check the glove compartment for vital medical information. Tip: place the sticker no higher than three inches from the bottom.

Notice from AT&T: TTY Emergency Calls via Wireless IP (Internet) is Not Recommended

December 8, 2015 in Advocacy & Access, Emergency Preparedness

 

 

TDI website
Dec 07, 2015

From the time Robert H. Weitbrecht made text-telephonys (TTY) possible up to the present, there has always been challenges to making our world all the more accessible. AT&T, one of the most ardent supporters for accessibility, has run into one of those such challenges.

When you call 911 through a regular telephone land line, using a telephone or TTY, your call is automatically connected to your 9-1-1 emergency services center – the 9-1-1 center that serves your location. Your address and phone number are automatically displayed on the computer screen of the 9-1-1 operator, even if you don’t type or say anything. The 9-1-1 operator can send emergency services to your location immediately, and call you back if your call is disconnected.

Learn more  …  TTY Emergency Calls

Fairfax County Job Opportunity – Access & Functional Needs

October 6, 2015 in Advocacy & Access, Emergency Preparedness

 

Access and Functional Needs Specialist
(Emergency Management Specialist II)

The Access and Functional Needs Specialist will coordinate the agencies’ emergency preparedness efforts for persons with access and functional needs and disabilities. Access and functional needs emergency planning initiatives include, but is not limited to, emergency transportation, emergency sheltering, outreach projects, medical needs registry and developing liaisons with access and function needs support groups.

Read entire Job Posting – Fairfax County

Attend presentation about – 911 to text for Fairfax County – RSVP Deadline Sept. 10th

September 4, 2015 in Advocacy & Access, Community Events, Emergency Preparedness

 

RSVP Deadline EXTENDED to Sept. 10th

UPDATE  – These presentations are specifically for Deaf and Hard of Hearing residents
ASL Interpreters will be present for both presentation dates

To learn about texting to 9-1-1, the department, call processing and dispatching, you are cordially invited to attend a special presentation by DPSC staff:

Monday, Sept 14, 6-8 p.m.
OR
Thursday, Sept 17, 6-8 p.m.

McConnell Public Safety and Transportation Operations Center
4890 Alliance Drive
Fairfax, VA 22030

Limited space – only 50 people may attend each session. You must RSVP to John Korman at john.korman@fairfaxcounty.gov by Sept. 7, 2015. Include: names of everyone in your party, email address, if anyone has their own personal hearing device, and if so, the type of device so equipment is properly configured for the meeting to meet attendee needs.

Sign Interpreters will be present for both dates

To request reasonable ADA accommodations, contact John Korman at 571-350-1765, TTY 711

 

A Fairfax County, Va., publication

2015 Virginia Sales Tax Holiday: Aug. 7-9

August 4, 2015 in Community News

From – Fairfax County Office of Emergency Management

Virginia is hosting the Sales Tax Holiday August 7-9, 2015. Back-to-school supplies will be tax-free, along with emergency preparedness supplies. Please share the attached flyer with your networks!

Tax-free emergency preparedness items:

  • Batteries, coolers, flashlights, weather radios, first aid kits, and more up to $60!
  • Chainsaws up to $350
  • Chainsaw accessories up to $60
  • Generators up to $1000

More info: http://www.tax.virginia.gov/content/sales-tax-holiday

Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PQbZ0fDwPRw

DOWNLOAD – 2015 Virginia Sales Tax Holiday – Emergency Preparedness Items

 

Take the 2015 Wireless Emergency Alert (WEA) Survey!

April 16, 2015 in Community News

 

 

Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA) can be received on cell phones across the country. These alerts are automatic, provide AMBER alerts, and weather emergency notifications. Unlike text alerts you may receive from your city, county, or institution, you do not have to sign-up to receive WEA messages.

Georgia Tech’s Center for Advanced Communications Policy is interested in your level of awareness of WEA messages. This survey will also help us understand how accessible and useful you think they are.  Your responses will be used to craft recommendations for improving the system that sends WEA messages and the mobile/cell phones that receive WEA messages.

This research is being funded by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), Science and Technology Directorate. The Research team’s goals are to (1) ensure the same timely and effective access to alerts and warnings for people with disabilities and (2) improve understanding of public response to mobile alerts and warnings.  The survey is open to both people with and without disabilities.  We encourage you take the survey yourself and share it with friends, family and colleagues so they too can provide their responses.

Start the Wireless Emergency Alert Survey!

[http://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/2071052/Wireless-Emergency-Alerts]

As an incentive for taking our 2015 WEA survey you will have a chance to win one of two $100 Amazon gift cards!

If you wish to take the survey over the phone, please email Salimah LaForce or call her at 404-894-8297.

 

 

Fairfax County Residents: Join Fairfax Alerts

June 16, 2014 in Community News

 

 

Fairfax County’s new and improved emergency alert system, Fairfax Alerts, goes live on June 19, 2014 and fxalerts-logo-sloganreplaces the Community Emergency Alert Network (CEAN).  Fairfax Alerts will provide you with important information during an emergency, and allows you to choose up to 10 delivery methods for alerts like home phone, cell phone, email, and text messages.  You can also receive alerts for up to five locations like home, work, school and more. Users can customize the types of weather, traffic and public safety alerts they wish to receive and even create a “do not disturb” timeframe when they don’t want to receive alerts.

 

Learn more.

You Can Now Text 9-1-1 in Case of Emergency

May 16, 2014 in Community News, Emergency Preparedness

 

Source: http://mashable.com/2014/05/15/text-emergency-911/

Starting on Thursday, people in select locations across the country can text 9-1-1 with emergencies if they are unable to call them in.

The Federal Communications Commission is rolling out the service to make it easier to contact 9-1-1 for people who are deaf, hard of hearing, have a speech disability or are in a situation in which making a call could be dangerous. The FCC’s website states that making a phone call is still the best option when possible, because it allows the person calling in to relay information more quickly. First responders can also triangulate the caller’s location with a phone call, something that can’t be done via text.

To that point, the FCC asks that anyone texting 9-1-1 provide information about the situation and his or her exact location. The providers supporting the service include AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile and Verizon Wireless.

The initial rollout [PDF] includes areas of Colorado, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Montana, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Texas, Vermont and Virginia. Though only people living in certain parts of those states can text 9-1-1 starting on Thursday, the FCC says anyone with a cellphone and enough service will be able to do so by the end of 2014.

Anyone who texts 9-1-1 in an area where emergency call centers do not yet support texts will receive a bounce-back message, informing them the text has not been sent and they should try to call instead.

Call centers are still updating their systems to be compatible with texts. According to the FCC’s site, anyone who wants to know whether their area has adopted the new technology can call their cellphone providers.

Text-to-9-1-1 in Emergencies

April 4, 2014 in Advocacy & Access, Community News

Text-to-9111: What is Your Emergency?

April WOW Policy Point

CTIA (The Wireless Association) is an international nonprofit association that has represented the wireless communications industry since 1984.

Over the past decade, texting has become an integral part of how we communicate with friends and family, but it also plays a vital role in emergencies, especially for those with disabilities. Learn about the development and adoption of text-to-911 service, and what it means for consumers by watching captioned video

http://blog.ctia.org/2014/04/02/text-to-911-2/

Take the Wireless Emergency Alert Survey

November 12, 2013 in Community News, Emergency Preparedness

 

 

Take the Wireless Emergency Alert Survey!
Thanks to the Mid-Atlantic ADA Center 11/12/2013
Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA) can be received on cell phones across the country. These alerts are automatic, provide AMBER alerts, and weather emergency notifications. Unlike text alerts you may receive from your city, county, or institution, you do not have to sign-up to receive WEA messages. The Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center for Wireless Technologies (Wireless RERC) is interested in your level of awareness of WEA messages. This survey will also help them understand how accessible and useful you think they are.
Take the Wireless Emergency Alert Survey
As an incentive for taking the 2013 WEA survey, participants will have a chance to win one of two $100 Amazon gift cards.
If participants wish to take the survey over the phone, please email DeeDee Bennett at deedee.bennett@cacp.gatech.edu or call her at 404-385-4618.

 


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. You do not need permission to share this information, but please be sure to credit NVRC.  This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

Be Prepared! 10 Things You Need to Know About Emergency Preparedness

September 17, 2013 in Emergency Preparedness

Disability Connection: 10 Things You Need to Know about Emergency Preparednessemergency

From Disability.gov

1. September is National Preparedness Month. Disasters can strike quickly and without warning making every second count during an emergency. Since 2004, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has sponsored National Preparedness Month, which encourages Americans to take simple steps to prepare for emergencies in their homes, businesses, schools and communities. The site’s toolkit includes helpful information, such as how to build an emergency supply kit, making a family game plan, staying informed before, during and after an emergency, and other preparedness resources and tips. Be ready and be safe! Find preparedness events in your community.

2. Tornadoes. During a tornado, finding shelter quickly is paramount to staying safe. An underground area, such as a basement or storm cellar, provides the best protection from a tornado. Staying in your trailer or mobile home, even if it is tied down, is not safe. If an underground shelter is unavailable, the following tips should be considered: Read more . . . →

Fall Classes for Fairfax Co. CERT Training

July 30, 2013 in Community Events, Emergency Preparedness

certlogoFall Classes for Fairfax County Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) Training

The Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) Program educates people about disaster preparedness for hazards that may impact their area and trains them in basic disaster response skills, such as fire safety, light search and rescue, team organization, and disaster medical operations. Using the training learned in the classroom CERT members can assist others in their neighborhood or workplace following an event when professional responders are not immediately available to help.

Fairfax County is offering three CERT Basic training classes in the FALL. Two identical classes will be conducted at the Fairfax County Fire and Rescue Academy (4600 West Ox Road). The first class is held on Mondays, beginning  Sept 9th, and the second on Wednesdays, beginning  Sept 11th.  Each class will have eight (8) sessions, 7:00 pm to 10:00 pm. There is a good mix classroom instruction with practice drills and exercises to enhance skill learning. These class utilizing the fire academy training facilities and instructors.

A third CERT class will be conducted in the community at the Great Springfield Volunteer Fire Station 22 (7011 Backlick Road) beginning on Wednesday Sept 11th. This class has eight (8) sessions, 7:00pm to 9:30 pm.  The classroom instruction is the same as the Academy classes, but the class size and hands-on instruction is limited by the available facilities.

CERT Basic training does not require any special physical strength or agility. Safety and preparedness is stressed throughout the course of instruction. This training is FREE. The CERT program furnishes personal protective equipment for the training that the students retain upon completion of the class.

People who go through CERT training have a better understanding of the potential threats to their home, workplace and community and can take the right steps to lessen the effects of these hazards on themselves, their homes or workplace.

When emergencies happen, CERT members can give critical support to first responders, provide immediate assistance to victims, and organize spontaneous volunteers at a disaster site. CERT members can also help with non-emergency projects that help improve the preparedness and safety of the community.

You can enroll in any of these three classes by going to the Fairfax County CERT website: www.fairfaxcountyCERT.com. Register as a new volunteer and when confirmed you can login and register for CERT class 73, 74 or 75.

For further information contact the Fairfax County Fire and Rescue Volunteer Coordinator’s Office, 703-246-3926.


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. You do not need permission to share this information, but please be sure to credit NVRC.  This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

FEMA Seeks Disability Integration Advisors

June 28, 2013 in Community News, Emergency Preparedness

U.S. Department of Homeland Security
 Federal Emergency Management Agency

FEMA

 

 

 

Dear Colleagues;

Marcie Roth, Director of FEMA’s Office of Disability Integration and Coordination, is excited to inform you of the employment opportunity with FEMA’s Incident Management CORE Program.  Several Emergency Management Specialist (Disability Integration Advisors – AD-0089-11) will be hired throughout the United States.  As a part of FEMA’s disaster workforce, CORE Reservists serve the nation by assisting all citizens and first responders during disasters or emergency situations.  As a CORE Disability Integration Advisor Reservist you will train, gain experience, and become qualified in this specific disaster role.  This position allows you to assist in the coordination and integration of persons with disabilities in the response and recovery efforts of impacted citizens, communities, Local, Tribal, and State governments. This announcement is open from June 26, 2013 until July 2, 2013 at 11:59pm EST.  Please feel free to forward this notification to anyone who may be interested in applying for this exciting opportunity to join FEMA and help integrate and coordinate national disability inclusive emergency management efforts.   Please follow the link below to the vacancy announcement on USAJOBS.GOV.

Emergency Management Specialist (Disability Integration Advisors – AD-0089-11) – Job Announcement Number: FEMA-MJ007-IM/COR-13

https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/346465800


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. You do not need permission to share this information, but please be sure to credit NVRC.  This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

Deaf, Hard of Hearing “Victims” Needed for Fairfax Co. CERT Exercise on June 30

June 4, 2013 in Community News, Emergency Preparedness

CERT CON Exercise
LORTON PRISON
June 30, 2013 – Call for Victim Volunteers 

NVRC Note: CERT has requested individuals who are deaf or have a hearing loss to participate as victims in this exercise so they can learn more about how best to help them in emergencies. Your participation will give CERT members more experience with the unique communication needs we have. You will also learn more about how to prepare for a real disaster, how to support our emergency responders.

Interested “victims” should RSVP to Kevin Mullins at actors@fairfaxcountycert.org

Sign language interpreters will be provided for the briefing and will be on hand throughout the exercise as needs arise. They will also be provided for debriefing at the end of the exercise.

The Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) is a system of training citizens to respond to large scale emergencies within their own neighborhood when the resources of the Fairfax County Fire and Rescue system have been overwhelmed. These citizens are trained in the absence of a fire department response to mobilize and organize a rescue team for their community. CERT CON is a regional convention of CERT members gathered to train, refresh and learn new skills. CERT teams from Virginia, DC, Maryland Delaware and other areas will be attending.

We are in need of people to play the role of “victims” for this drill. As a victim you will be expected to play your role as realistically as possible.  You will receive “make-up” to show “wounds” and will have fake blood placed on your clothes. As such, please dress for the elements (we have the drill rain or shine) as you will be waiting outside to be found, in clothes that you can get very dirty, stained, and possibly even torn. You must wear long pants and closed end shoes, due to the location, we cannot make exceptions to this rule. Some of you may also be called upon to assist the rescuers in performing their duties. You may participate in any way you feel comfortable.

This is a very exciting opportunity to help your community. Live “victims” are essential to providing high quality training, and you’ll learn quite a bit too! We’ll even throw in lunch afterwards.

You need to arrive at the Lorton Prison Complex, Youth Facility, 9845 Furnace Road Lorton VA 22079 (also known as Landfill Drive) by 7:00 am. We’ll have signs posted on the roads to direct you too. The drill should be completed by no later than 1pm. We’ll need you to participate for the entire time. However, if you need to leave early due to an emergency, just let a facilitator know so we can account for you. Due to limited parking, it is requested that you carpool as much as possible. You can use Google Map coordinates: 38.688709, -77.240732.

The schedule for the date usually goes something like this:

7:00 am (sharp) – Arrive and park. Check in. You’ll be registered and your contact information taken. You’ll be given a card with a set of “injuries” you are to act out. You’ll start in the makeup process. While this doesn’t take much time, there is a wait to get through. The lead instructor will give you a brief presentation on safety issues, what to expect, and what CERT is all about! This is a great time to sign up for a class!

7:30am – 8:30am – You’ll be escorted to the area that you’ll be “trapped” or laying.

9:00pm – The Drill begins. The rescuers will search, sort the victims by severity, extricate those that are trapped, and transport all victims to a treatment area.

NOON – Lunch, debrief, “thank-you” from the students and Victim checkout.

Adults are preferred, but CERT will gladly accept minors 15 years and older with signed parental consent (attached) with a full understanding of what’s involved.    At checkout, those that would like them can receive a certificate signifying 6.5 hours of community service provided. Please give your name, phone number and E-mail address to the person who provided you with this request. Bring the attached form to the exercise.

REQUIREMENTS:  You must wear long pants and closed end shoes—no exceptions here! Also bring a water bottle for the exercise and a folding chair for lunch (put your name on your chair). Bring iPods, phones or any electrics may get wet or damaged so if you bring them be prepared to protect them.  Also wear sunscreen and bug repellent is recommended. 


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. You do not need permission to share this information, but please be sure to credit NVRC.  This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

FCC Adopts Rules on Accessible Televised Emergency Information for Blind, Vision Impaired Individuals

April 13, 2013 in Advocacy & Access, Community News, Technology

FCC Adopts Rules on Emergency Information and Video Equipment Requirements for Emergency Information and Video Description

From the Federal Communications Commission, 4/12/2013

The FCC adopted rules to make televised emergency information more accessible to individuals who are blind or visually impaired.  The new rules require emergency information that appears visually during a non-news program (such as when information about the emergency appears visually on the bottom of the screen during a regularly scheduled program) to be provided audibly on a secondary audio stream.  The rules will take effect two years after publication in the Federal Register.  However, The Weather Channel has an additional 6 months to comply, and The Weather Channel on DIRECTV has an additional 1 year to comply.

New Requirements for Equipment.  The FCC also adopted rules to ensure that certain equipment used to receive, play back, or record television programs is able to make secondary audio streams available.  Secondary audio streams will convey emergency information, as well as the video description that makes programs accessible to individuals who are blind or visually impaired.  These rules also go into effect two years after they are published in the Federal Register.

Further Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (FNPRM).   In addition to adopting the new rules, the FCC is asking the public to comment on three issues:

(1)  whether the FCC should require companies covered by the new rules to provide contact information and customer support services to help consumers who are blind or visually impaired navigate between the main and secondary audio streams;

(2)   whether new services that deliver certain types of television programming over tablets, laptops, personal computers, smartphones, or similar devices should be covered by the FCC’s requirements for video description and accessible emergency information; and

(3)   whether the FCC should require accessibility content on the secondary audio stream to be tagged in a manner that enables equipment to detect this content when it is present – this will make it easier for consumers who are blind or visually impaired to find the secondary audio stream.

FNPRM Comment Date:  (60 days after date of publication in the Federal Register)

FNPRM Reply Comment Date:  (90 days after date of publication in the Federal Register)

Report and Order and Further Notice of Proposed Rule making:
http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/FCC-13-45A1.docx
http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/FCC-13-45A1.pdf

Statement issued by Commissioner Clyburn:
http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/FCC-13-45A2.docx
http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/FCC-13-45A2.pdf

Statement issued by Commissioner Rosenworcel:
http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/FCC-13-45A3.docx
http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/FCC-13-45A3.pdf

Statement issued by Commissioner Pai:
http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/FCC-13-45A4.docx
http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/FCC-13-45A4.pdf

For more information, contact Diana Sokolow, Diana.Sokolow@fcc.gov, or Maria Mullarkey, Maria.Mullarkey@fcc.gov, of the Media Bureau, Policy Division, (202) 418-2120.


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.