Ear Buds - Archive

The Coming Wave of Bionic Hearing Gadgets

August 18, 2015 in Technology

 

Startups like Doppler Labs are building earbuds that will let you turn down the volume on crying babies and pump up the bass on live music.

MIT Technology Review
By Rachel Metz
August 14, 2015

In a windowless office on a tiny San Francisco side street, Noah Kraft is making me hear things in a way I’ve never heard them before.

I’m wearing a wireless earbud in each ear. The devices, which are white and look kind of like big Altoids mints, are the latest prototype built by Doppler Labs, a wearable-technology startup of which Kraft is cofounder and CEO. Kraft is sitting diagonally across from me, chatting, and using an iPhone app to manipulate the sound of his voice and the relatively quiet background noise of the office in ways that only I can hear.

He adds an echo to his voice. He raises and lowers the bass, treble, and midrange. Then he stands up and walks several feet away, but he sounds as loud as if he were yapping right in my ear—until I take out the earbuds and confirm that he’s actually speaking pretty quietly.

Read More . . . . Doppler Labs

 

Study: Earbuds can damage hearing permanently

March 17, 2015 in Hearing Loss & Deafness, Research

 

 

Medical officials suggest turning down volume, take breaks

KITV ABC – Hawaii
Mar 13, 2015
By Paula Akana

HONOLULU —It’s a common sight around town: People going about their daily routine wearing earbuds and listening to their favorite books or music.

But many people, especially young ones, may be listening to music too loud and putting themselves at risk for losing their hearing.

Watch Video-nocaptions with transcript 

“I think you’ve got to be careful. Keep it down so you can hear what’s around you to be safe,” said earbud user Scott Lawton.

Lawton loves the convenience of earbuds, especially when he’s exercising. David Thomas uses them, too, but understands the importance of keeping the volume low.

“Definitely, definitely. There’s always the chance of injury if you listen too loud or too long,” said Thomas.

The problem is that young people don’t seem to follow those rules.