Drug - Archive

Hearing Loss Drug Trial Takes Place at Firing Range

August 27, 2015 in Research

 

 

 

DRUG – Discovery & Development
Tue, 08/25/2015
By Ryan Bushey, Associate Editor

An experimental drug trial is underway at the Fort Jackson military base in South Carolina.

Soldiers are taking a liquid micronutrient called d-methionine to see if it can potentially prevent hearing loss, writes The Wall Street Journal (WSJ). Methionine is an amino acid that is typically found in meat, fish, and dairy products.

Southern Illinois University School of Medicine professor and audiologist Kathleen C.M. Campbell developed this compound as a drug. She’s working with the Army to find a way to help military members dealing with noise-induced hearing damage as a result of constantly-firing loud weapons.

A randomized Phase 3 Food and Drug Administration sanctioned study began in late 2013. It was designed to enroll up to 600 participants over three years, according to the WSJ report.

Read more  . . . Drug Testing

Antibiotic could cause hearing loss in preemies, study indicates

August 4, 2015 in Community News, Research

 

 

The Oregonian/OregonLive
By Lynne Terry
July 29, 2015

The drug that cured Peter Steyger of meningitis as a toddler also made him deaf.

Now a researcher at Oregon Health & Science University, he just discovered that the the class of drugs used to cure him can strip away hearing.

They’re often given to infants in neonatal intensive care units.

Those drugs, broad-spectrum antibiotics, are designed to kill a wide range of bacteria. These medications are routinely given to infants admitted to neonatal intensive care units to clear up any infection or prevent one, Steyger said. Life-threatening bacteria can kill preemies in 24 hours.

But here’s the rub: These drugs are toxic to the ear. They pose the biggest threat of hearing loss amid inflammation during an infection.

In research, Steyger gave a broad-spectrum antibiotic, an aminoglycoside, to mice. Healthy rodents prescribed a low dose suffered relatively little hearing loss. But that was not the case with infected mice, whose hearing was more severely affected.

“If you give a healthy animal, or healthy human, an aminoglycoside for long enough they will go deaf, Steyger said. “If they have an infection that induces an inflammation response, they will lose their hearing much, much faster.”

Read more  . . . Antibiotic

What Did You Say? FDA Plans Study on How Hearing Loss Affects Drug Ad Understanding

June 26, 2015 in Advocacy & Access, Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

Regulatory Affairs Professional Society
By Alexander Gaffney, RAC
June 24, 2015

 

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) says it is planning a new study to assess whether older Americans are able to adequately hear all of the risks presented in televised pharmaceutical advertising.

Background

The study, announced in a 24 June 2015 posting in the Federal Register, is somewhat similar to other direct-to-consumer (DTC) drug advertising studies proposed by FDA in the last few years, including studies on how adolescents understand risk in drug advertising and how one’s spouse might affect one’s understanding of drug risks and benefits.

As FDA explains in its Federal Register notice, the elderly often find themselves in a difficult situation: At a time when they are often taking an increasing number of prescription pharmaceutical products to counteract the effects of aging, their ability to understand the benefits and risks presented by those products is often diminished.

Read More  . . .  Drug Ad 

Deaf or Death? In Drug Trial, Parents Weigh Life vs. Hearing Loss

March 10, 2015 in Hearing Loss & Deafness, Research

 

 

An experimental treatment could let children with a rare genetic disease live longer, but it may make them deaf

BETHESDA, Md.—While waiting for an infusion of a drug that might save his life, 15-year-old Andrew Marella gripped the controls of an NFL videogame, the hand-held version of a sport he played when he could still run without fear.

Andrew is in a clinical drug trial of cyclodextrin, a sugar-based substance that scientists hope will stop or slow the progress of a rare genetic disease that kills most patients by the time they are old enough to vote.

There is a good chance cyclodextrin will extend Andrew’s life. But his parents worry this will be the dose that leaves him deaf.

Families in the drug trial must decide whether to permit the higher doses of cyclodextrin that research shows might arrest the disease. Hearing loss is one side effect. “Deaf or death, what are our options?” said Andrea Marella, Andrew’s mother. “We have to keep moving forward.”

Read more  . . . Deaf or Death?

 

Drug to restore hearing loss being developed

October 30, 2014 in Hearing Loss & Deafness, Research

 

 

Zeenews India.com
Thursday, October 23, 2014
Original Article

New York: Boosting the production of a key protein, called NT3, could help restore hearing loss caused by noise exposure and normal ageing, a research found.

The protein plays an important role in maintaining communication between the ears and brain, the findings showed, offering scientists a target to develop drugs that might boost NT3 action or production.

“We began this work 15 years ago to answer very basic questions about the inner ear, and now we have been able to restore hearing after partial deafening with noise, a common problem for people,” said lead researcher Gabriel Corfas from the University of Michigan in the US.

NT3 is crucial to the body’s ability to form and maintain connections between hair cells in the ear and nerve cells that carry signal to the brain, the researchers demonstrated.

This special type of connection, called a ribbon synapse, allows extra-rapid communication of signals, which travel back and forth across tiny gaps between the two types of cells.

“It has become apparent that hearing loss due to damaged ribbon synapses is a very common and challenging problem, whether it’s due to noise or normal ageing,” Corfas added.

Using a special genetic technique, the researchers made it possible for some mice to produce additional NT3 in cells of specific areas of the inner ear after they were exposed to noise loud enough to reduce hearing.

Mice with extra NT3 regained their ability to hear much better than the control mice.

The researchers will now explore the role of NT3 in human ears, and seek drugs that might boost NT3 action or production.

The findings appeared online in the journal eLife.