depression - Archive

Silently Suffering From Hearing Loss Negatively Affects Quality of Life

August 12, 2015 in Hearing Loss & Deafness, Research

 

American Psychological Association
August 7, 2015

New hearing technologies can help, studies show

TORONTO — Hearing loss in adults is under treated despite evidence that hearing aid technology can significantly lessen depression and anxiety and improve cognitive functioning, according to a presentation at the American Psychological Association’s 123rd Annual Convention.

“Many hard of hearing people battle silently with their invisible hearing difficulties, straining to stay connected to the world around them, reluctant to seek help,” said David Myers, PhD, a psychology professor and textbook writer at Hope College in Michigan who lives with hearing loss.

In a National Council on Aging study of 2,304 people with hearing loss, those who didn’t wear hearing aids were 50 percent more likely to suffer from sadness or depression than people who did wear them, he said. Additionally, hearing aid users were much more likely to participate in social activities regularly.

Although a genetic condition caused him to start losing his hearing as a teenager, Myers did not get hearing aids until he was in his 40s. Like many hard of hearing people, he resisted hearing technology. People wait an average of six years from the first signs of hearing loss  . . . .

Read More …. Silently Suffering

Siemens Gives $1 Million Worth of Hearing Aids for Cancer Patients Suffering Hearing Loss

March 31, 2014 in Community News

From the Orlando Sentinel-mjameson@tribune.com 3/31/2014

Siemens is donating $1 million worth of hearing aids to cancer patients suffering from hearing loss, the company announced last week in Orlando at the American Association of Audiology conference.

Siemens will donate the hearing aids to adults and children who have incurred permanent hearing loss due to the side effects of chemotherapy, radiation, surgery or other cancer treatment regimens, said Scott Davis, CEO of Siemens Hearing Instruments. Hearing loss is a common side effect of cancer treatment.

Siemens is partnering with the Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation, a national voluntary health nonprofit, and CancerCare, a leading national organization providing free support to those facing the emotional, practical and financial challenges of cancer.

Together the partners will bring hearing aids and audiology services to cancer patients across the country as part of The Baton Pass, a grass-roots fundraising campaign for Stand Up To Cancer, a national cause working to accelerate cancer research.

“Children and adults undergoing treatment have enough to worry about,” said Davis. “By partnering with these two organizations and their network of leading cancer institutions, we’re able to provide the gift of hearing to as many patients as possible.”

Left untreated, hearing loss in adults has been associated with cognitive decline, depression, dementia, heart disease and diabetes. In children, untreated hearing loss may result in poor cognitive and psychosocial development and delayed or compromised speech and language skills.

mjameson@tribune.com or 407-420-5158

Hearing Loss Tied to Depression in Study

March 20, 2014 in Research

Women, non-seniors more likely to be affected this way, researchers say

Hearing Loss Tied to Depression in Study
By Kathleen Doheny
HealthDay ReporterTHURSDAY, March 6, 2014 (HealthDay News) — Hearing loss is associated with depression among American adults, especially women and those younger than age 70, according to new research.

While other studies previously have found the same link, many of them looked only at older adults or at specific regions or ethnicities, and results have been mixed, the researchers pointed out.

In the new study, as hearing declined, the percentage of depressed adults increased — from about 5 percent in those who had no hearing problems to more than 11 percent in those who did.

Read original article . . .