dementia - Archive

Access to hearing aids could help fight dementia, says doctor

February 25, 2016 in Hearing Aids, Hearing Loss & Deafness, Technology

 

Physician Frank Lin says treating hearing loss could help fight cognitive decline as he estimates 36% of dementia risk linked to hearing impairment

The Guardian News 
Sunday 14 February 2016

Hearing loss contributes to dementia and mental decline, according to new medical research by a doctor who plans to begin the first clinical trial to study whether hearing aids could prevent or mitigate brain decline.

On Sunday physician Frank Lin described his research at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in Washington DC.

“I’m asking how can our peripheral functions, namely hearing, affect our central functions – our brain,” he asked. “Unfortunately this question is completely unknown. This trial has never been done.”

Lin said the prevalence of hearing loss doubles for every decade of life, and that its high frequency has led physicians to dismiss it too often. “The vast majority of dementias in late life are multifactorial,” he said, “but the role of hearing loss has just not been studied.”

Read more  . . . dementia

New Generation Hearing Aids & Technologies Help To Reduce Anxiety & Depression

August 18, 2015 in Hearing Loss & Deafness, Technology

 

 

Medical Daily.com
Aug 7, 2015 01:00 PM
By  Susan Scutti

About one-third of American adults between the ages of 65 and 75 have some degree of hearing loss, while for those who are even older, that number rises to nearly one in two, the Mayo Clinic notes. A new study suggests hearing loss — or hearing less — is under-treated despite evidence that the latest generation of hearing aids may help to lessen depression and anxiety while also improving mental functioning.

“Anger, frustration, depression and anxiety are all common among people who find themselves hard of hearing,” Dr. David Myers, a psychology professor at Hope College in Michigan, stated in a press release. “Getting people to use the latest in hearing aid technology can help them regain control of their life and achieve emotional stability and even better cognitive functioning.”

Heredity and chronic exposure to loud noises are the main factors that contribute to hearing loss, scientists say. While people commonly fear excessive earwax might contribute to their hearing loss, it usually does so only temporarily. A 2011 study investigated hearing loss and its relationship to dementia and found the risk of all-cause dementia increased with hearing loss severity. Since social isolation has been linked to dementia (and other cognitive disorders), this result makes intuitive sense.

Read More  . . .  New Generation Hearing Aids

Siemens Gives $1 Million Worth of Hearing Aids for Cancer Patients Suffering Hearing Loss

March 31, 2014 in Community News

From the Orlando Sentinel-mjameson@tribune.com 3/31/2014

Siemens is donating $1 million worth of hearing aids to cancer patients suffering from hearing loss, the company announced last week in Orlando at the American Association of Audiology conference.

Siemens will donate the hearing aids to adults and children who have incurred permanent hearing loss due to the side effects of chemotherapy, radiation, surgery or other cancer treatment regimens, said Scott Davis, CEO of Siemens Hearing Instruments. Hearing loss is a common side effect of cancer treatment.

Siemens is partnering with the Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation, a national voluntary health nonprofit, and CancerCare, a leading national organization providing free support to those facing the emotional, practical and financial challenges of cancer.

Together the partners will bring hearing aids and audiology services to cancer patients across the country as part of The Baton Pass, a grass-roots fundraising campaign for Stand Up To Cancer, a national cause working to accelerate cancer research.

“Children and adults undergoing treatment have enough to worry about,” said Davis. “By partnering with these two organizations and their network of leading cancer institutions, we’re able to provide the gift of hearing to as many patients as possible.”

Left untreated, hearing loss in adults has been associated with cognitive decline, depression, dementia, heart disease and diabetes. In children, untreated hearing loss may result in poor cognitive and psychosocial development and delayed or compromised speech and language skills.

mjameson@tribune.com or 407-420-5158