deafness - Archive

New book provides insight into diagnosis & research of hereditary hearing loss

July 7, 2016 in Hearing Loss & Deafness, Research

 

 

News-Medical
July 7, 2016

Genetics of Deafness offers a journey through areas crucial for understanding the causes and effects of hearing loss. It covers such topics as the latest approaches in diagnostics and deafness research and the current status and future promise of gene therapy for hearing restoration. The book begins by bringing attention to how hearing loss affects the individual and society. Methods of hearing loss detection and management throughout the lifespan are highlighted as is a particularly new development in newborn hearing screening. The challenges of hearing loss, an extremely heterogeneous impairment, are addressed.  Read more . . . Genetics of Deafness 

Publisher – http://www.karger.com/

So why are deaf roles still handed to hearing actors?

December 11, 2015 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

Deafness is having a cultural moment. So why are deaf roles still handed to hearing actors?

The current deaf staging of “Spring Awakening” on Broadway demonstrates that non-hearing actors are just as capable as the hearing.

Washington Post

December 8

As a deaf actor, I’m always getting the same questions: What it is like to be a deaf actor? Isn’t it hard? How do you do roles if they are not for the deaf?

I tell them I am just an actress. Even though my deafness is a huge part of my identity, I can perform any role a hearing person can, and it matters to me that I receive the same opportunities as my hearing colleagues.

The success of Deaf West’s production of “Spring Awakening” on Broadway is proof that actors of diverse abilities can still create a beautiful show. The cast is a mix of hearing and deaf actors, all of whom use American Sign Language for the entire performance. (The deaf actors are accompanied by the voice actors.) The deaf community has responded strongly to our show, but hearing audiences have been also been touched by the art of our language.

Read more  . . . deaf roles

NIDCD Scientists Advance Understanding of Molecules in Deafness Genes, Head & Neck Cancers

August 14, 2014 in Research

 

 

NIH-NID

August 12, 2014

NIDCD Scientists Advance Understanding of Molecules in Deafness Genes, Head & Neck Cancers

NIH Researchers Characterize Elusive Myosin 15, Protein Linked to a Form of Hereditary Hearing Loss

NIH researchers report that they have purified a key part of myosin 15, a molecular motor protein that helps build healthy hearing structures in the inner ear. Mutations in the myosin 15 gene (MYO15A) have been linked to a form of hereditary deafness in humans. Using a novel approach to express the protein, researchers have revealed the first detailed insight into the molecule’s structure and function, laying the foundation for new treatments for some forms of hearing loss. The new approach to expressing myosin 15 may also help the study of other types of myosin motors, such as skeletal and cardiac muscle myosins, which could accelerate development of targeted drug therapies for heart disease and other health conditions. The study was published online August 11 in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Read more »

Researchers Find Molecular Similarities Among Head and Neck, Lung, and Bladder Cancers

Researchers at the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD), one of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), working as part of a team of scientists with The Cancer Genome Atlas Network, have identified a characteristic molecular pattern shared by head and neck, lung, and some bladder cancers. The molecular profile offers information that could help physicians diagnose and develop new treatment strategies for these diseases. The results of the study appeared online August 7 in the journal Cell. Read more »

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NVAD Reuben I. Altizer Award Ceremony – Today

March 14, 2013 in Community News

Northern Virginia Association of the Deaf

 

General Meeting and 2011 R.I.A. Award Ceramony

Thursday, March 14, 2013 7:30 P.M.

 Reuben I. Altizer Meeting Room

Read more . . . →

Save The Date: Celebrate Communication – May 11 2013

March 1, 2013 in Community Events, Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness, NVRC, NVRC Announcements, NVRC Calendar

Celebrate Communication 2013

Saturday, May 11, 2013, 10 AM to 3 PM

George Mason University,
4373 Mason Pond Drive, Fairfax, VA

Informational Exhibits • Technology Demonstrations • Children’s Activities  • Local ResourcesFree Hearing Screenings • Crafts • Prizes and More!
Celebarate2013
Now in Our 11th Year  – Free Admission

info@nvrc.org  • 703-352-9055V  • 703-352-9056 TTY  •  www.nvrc.org

NVRC-blue-300x300 kihd_logo_standalone GMU Lions_International

Brought to you by: the Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), the Helen A. Kellar Institute for Human disAbilities (KIHD), Lions International and George Mason University. Publicity courtesy of Virginia Relay.

Pushing Science’s Limits in Sign Language Lexicon

December 3, 2012 in Hearing Loss & Deafness

By DOUGLAS QUENQUA, NY Times 12/3/2012

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/04/science/sign-language-researchers-broaden-science-lexicon.html?ref=health

Imagine trying to learn biology without ever using the word “organism.” Or studying to become a botanist when the only way of referring to photosynthesis is to spell the word out, letter by painstaking letter.

For deaf students, this game of scientific Password has long been the daily classroom and laboratory experience. Words like “organism” and “photosynthesis” — to say nothing of more obscure and harder-to-spell terms — have no single widely accepted equivalent in sign language. This means that deaf students and their teachers and interpreters must improvise, making it that much harder for the students to excel in science and pursue careers in it.

“Often times, it would involve a lot of finger-spelling and a lot of improvisation,” said Matthew Schwerin, a physicist with the Food and Drug Administration who is deaf, of his years in school. “For the majority of scientific terms,” Mr. Schwerin and his interpreter for the day would “try to find a correct sign for the term, and if nothing was pre-existing, we would come up with a sign that was agreeable with both parties.”

Now thanks to the Internet — particularly the boom in online video — resources for deaf students seeking science-related signs are easier to find and share. Crowdsourcing projects in both American Sign Language and British Sign Language are under way at several universities, enabling people who are deaf to coalesce around signs for commonly used terms.

This year, one of those resources, the Scottish Sensory Centre’s British Sign Language Glossary Project, added 116 new signs for physics and engineering terms, including signs for “light-year,”  (hold one hand up and spread the fingers downward for “light,” then bring both hands together in front of your chest and slowly move them apart for “year”), “mass” and “X-ray” (form an X with your index fingers, then, with the index finger on the right hand, point outward).

Read more . . . →

California School for the Deaf Wins League Title

November 30, 2012 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness

California School of the Deaf football team stuns league to win title,
nearly lands spot in sectional championship

By Cameron Smith, Sports Blog-Yahoo.com 11/29/2012

See the full story and a video (signed, with captions):
http://sports.yahoo.com/blogs/highschool-prep-rally/california-school-deaf-football-team-stuns-league-win-183111387.html

They are a growing football powerhouse, the kind that uses both physicality and skill to stir fear in any foe. They have a small roster — just 19 players suit up for the varsity football squad — and are smaller in stature than nearly any opponent, with no player reaching even 200 pounds, let alone the 300 often breached by top linemen. Read more . . . →

Deaf Caseworkers Bring Vital Skills to Their Job

November 5, 2012 in Advocacy & Access, Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness

Deaf caseworkers bring vital skills to their job

By Cynthia Billhartz Gregorian, St. Louis Post-Dispatch 11/1/2012

cbillhartz@post-dispatch.com

Jody Newman estimates that she’s been hospitalized 20 times in the past 20 years. To be honest, she says, she’s lost count.

“I had many counselors over the years, and they just didn’t work for me. I was suicidal, and didn’t know how to cope with myself or situations,” said Newman, 58, of St. Louis, through an American Sign Language interpreter one recent afternoon. “But not now.”

Two years ago Newman, who has been deaf since she was 5, met Irvine Stewart, and her life hasn’t been the same since. She’s happier; more stable. Read more . . . →

DeafBlind Music Teacher Honored

October 25, 2012 in NVRC Announcements

From IrishTimes.com 10/22/2012

A deaf-blind music teacher who developed a unique method of teaching others has been recognised for her inspirational work.

For the last 20 years Orla O’Sullivan, from Frankfield in Cork, has taught scores of students, from beginners up to diploma level.

Ms O’Sullivan, who started teaching deaf children at a local primary school in the mid-1990s, now uses a purpose-built classroom in her home for hearing and non-hearing pupils.

She believes all schoolchildren should be given the option to learn music, regardless of disability.

“I teach music in a standard, normal way. The difference is in how I prepare,” she said.

“I memorise everything, even the questions that are normally asked by students at the various levels. With my hearing aids on and with close lip-reading I can usually make out what is being said.

“As regards the music, again, with my hearing aids on, I can hear/feel some of the notes. The notes I cannot hear, I hear in my imagination. As regards sight, what I see is normal for me. I can only imagine what a person with perfect vision can see.”

Ms O’Sullivan was among nine people with hearing loss commended at the Hidden Hearing Heroes Awards in the Alexandra Hotel in Dublin.

The workplace award winner was left profoundly deaf and vision-impaired when given a drug after she contracted double pneumonia at six weeks old.

She said her mother noticed that, as a young baby, she reacted to certain kinds of music, including vibrations from piano keys. After her first music lesson at six, she spent most of her childhood playtime practising on her piano.

Ms O’Sullivan said teaching music to deaf pupils is much more difficult and demanding for both the teacher and the pupil, but as a deaf-blind teacher she feels she is the best qualified to do it.

Read the rest of the story at: http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/breaking/2012/1022/breaking27.html

 

 


Distributed 2011 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

 

 

 

Netflix Charged With Discriminating Against the Deaf

October 17, 2011 in Technology

NVRC Note: This lawsuit is discussed at http://www.hackingnetflix.com/2011/10/netflix-other-companies-face-yet-another-lawsuit-over-captions.html

Some of the comments are very harsh.PRLog (Press Release) – Oct 4, 2011 – Netflix and four other high tech corporations have been charged with violating human rights in a formal legal complaint which alleges that willfully refusing to provide closed captioning on most of the programs it transmits over the Internet constitutes illegal discrimination against the handicapped by denying the deaf “full and equal enjoyment” of its goods and/or services in violation of the D.C. Human Rights Act, the toughest anti-discrimination law in the U.S.

If convicted, Netflix would have to add closed captioning to virtually all of the movies, TV shows, and the other programming it provides over the Internet to customers; a tremendous benefit not only to the deaf, but also to the much larger number of customers who are older or otherwise simply hard of hearing, says public interest law professor John Banzhaf, who has filed more than 100 successful complaints against discrimination based upon race, sex, country of origin, and disability.

Netflix — and Apple, Panasonic, Tivo, and Toshiba, which have been charged with “aiding and abetting” for providing and modifying their devices to facilitate Netflix’s Internet transmissions — could also face penalties for every day and to every person who has been subjected to this discrimination, as well being forced to pay attorney fees.

The complaint recites that Netflix has assured deaf organizations, as well as deaf individuals who have complained about the discrimination, that there is no technical reason why the closed captioning information — which is allegedly already available in most of the source material Netflix uses to transmit the programming, including even in the DVDs which it provides to customers — cannot be transmitted over the Internet, and Netflix has repeatedly promised to do so.

Netflix’s “willfully, maliciously, and unfairly refusing to provide closed captioning services for the programming it transmits to customers through the Internet,” and its continued refusal to meet the legitimate needs of their deaf, hearing impaired, and hard of hearing customers, is the basis of this legal action, says Banzhaf, who helped establish the National Center for Law and the Deaf, require the open captioning of information in emergency messages broadcast by TV stations, get deaf students admitted to law schools, and caused Congress to invite the first deaf person to testify on deaf-related issues before a congressional committee.

Many courts have held that even providing the same services to everyone may nevertheless illegally discriminate against one group as compared with another if that service has the effect or consequence of adversely affecting one group. For example, a university which provides uniforms and equipment to its university athletes, but doesn’t provide protective cups and/or jock straps, obviously has the effect or consequence of discriminating against the male athletes, even though the female athletes are likewise denied these same items.

Two U.S. Court of Appeals decisions make this point very clearly. In the first, the Sixth Circuit court held that even providing identical restroom facilities to males and females may constitute illegal sex discrimination against women because their needs are very different. In that case the facilities were filthy, which presented a far more serious health problem to women since men don’t have to sit to urinate. The court held “anatomical differences between men and women are ‘immutable characteristics,’ just as race, color and national origin are” – and, of course, as deafness is.

Similarly, in another case, where both male and female workers were equally required to urinate outdoors in the open, the court held that the requirement constituted “sexual harassment” of female employees because the same act of urination was both more difficult and more embarrassing for women than for men

This legal proceeding against Netflix is also similar to two other discrimination complaints brought against eHarmony, a match-making Internet website.  Both charged that although the company provided the same service to everyone — help in finding a person of the opposite sex who might be compatible — it nevertheless discriminated on the basis of the prohibited basis of sexual orientation since the service was virtually useless to homosexuals — just as a movie-via-Internet service without captions is virtually useless to the deaf.

eHarmony was ordered to pay $55,000 in one case, and to settle for $2 million in the other.

Ironically, deaf people may sign up to receive DVDs in the mail from Netflix containing many of the same programs they can also receive over the Internet, and which have closed captions which they can turn on so that they can understand and fully enjoy the programming.  However, they cannot get this same closed captioning if they obtain their programming from Netflix over the Internet.

As a result, the deaf are denied the full and equal enjoyment of the Netflix Internet service since, with the DVD delivery-by-mail service:
■ they have to order the programming days in advance and cannot be spontaneous, entertain visitors with different tastes who suddenly drop in, etc.;
■  they must wait several days before they can watch the programming they desire;
■  they are limited — by the number of DVDs they can have out at any one time — in terms of how many programs they can watch in a given time span;
■  they must put up with the inconvenience of opening and repacking the mailing envelopes, finding and then putting them back into a mailbox, etc.

Banzhaf, who has been a leader in using legal action as a weapon against the problems of the deaf, just as he has also done with the problems of smoking, obesity, and sex discrimination, says that finally the silent minority may be heard, and be able to enjoy — even if they cannot hear — the movies and TV programs everyone else takes for granted.

JOHN F. BANZHAF III, B.S.E.E., J.D., Sc.D.
Professor of Public Interest Law
George Washington University Law School,
FAMRI Dr. William Cahan Distinguished Professor,
Fellow, World Technology Network,
Founder, Action on Smoking and Health (ASH)
Creator, Banzhaf Index of Voting Power
2000 H Street, NW, Suite S402
Washington, DC 20052, USA
(202) 994-7229 // (703) 527-8418
http://banzhaf.net/

 

HLAA Workshop: Sounds for Seniors: an Honest Look at Hearing Loss in the 55+ Community

July 8, 2011 in Education & Outreach

 By Bonnie O’Leary  7/7/11

I chose this workshop because I have spent so many years providing outreach to the senior community here in Northern Virginia.  Sheila Adams of DeLand, Florida, gave a very interesting program with a personal touch to it.

Ms. Adams lost her hearing when she was a  young adult, getting her first hearing aid at the age of 27.  At 47, she received her first cochlear implant, and she got her second implant at the age of 55.    Her career as a school teacher was filled with struggles caused by her hearing loss, and she talked about overcoming  those challenges.

Ms. Adams spent some time talking about her own family whom she feels represents senior citizens in many ways.  Her mother has been hard of hearing all her life, but very active because she has worn hearing aids and used assistive listening devices.  She has been married to Ms. Adams’ father for 63 years, but he now has Parkinson’s disease which causes him to speak softly and makes it harder now for her mother to communicate with her father.   Both have a slight memory loss.  One of Ms. Adams’ aunts is 88, and can still hear.  Another aunt is 90 and has glaucoma as well as macular degeneration.  Just observing these and other aging family members, Ms. Adams sees a wide range of senior issues that impact socialization and communication.

Seniors were categorized as “young-old” (ages 55-75) and “old-old” (ages 75+) as Ms. Adams discussed successful aging.  Successful aging depends on how well seniors accept change and loss.  These can include physical, psychological, social, economic, and interpersonal.  A lot will depend on the senior’s endurance and attitude as well as manual dexterity.    An “old” senior, for instance, can’t go back to normal after bad sprains or broken bones.  Those sprains become the new normal, and they have to accept that they need help, which is not easy for seniors who have been active and independent throughout their lives.  Adapting to  hearing loss is also difficult, especially when the senior has had a lot of other issues to contend with, whether they be physical or emotional, such as grieving over the death of friends.  Sometimes, Ms. Adams has found in her own family that “one’s perception of health is a greater influencing factor than one’s actual health.” 

How aging impacts hearing

The accumulation of noise over the years eventually takes its toll in the inner ear, causing age-related hearing loss.  But there are other physical changes happening at the same time.  There is often more and harder wax that accumulates and is increasingly difficult to remove.  The ear canal narrows, and the sensitivity of the hair cells changes, often producing a greater sensitivity to noise.  With these changes, there is a slowing of the message-carrying ability of the ear which can produce changes in perception.  Cognitive changes include a shortened attention span as well as fatigue.

Quality of life

Staying connected is a huge party of successful aging, maintaining the relationships that are important to seniors.  Having something meaningful to do, a purposeful activity, is also important, as well as have opportunities for intellectual growth and learning.  Recreation and entertainment are a part of staying connected, and Ms. Adams remarked how ironic it is to have more time in retirement but also more limitations in our abilities to do things.  Finally, a senior’s quality of life is also enhanced by spiritual growth and as well as a sense of hope, of having some positive prospects.  Hearing loss can render all of these desired aspects of life very challenging.

Factors affecting how a senior handles hearing loss

The temperament and personality of a senior will play a large part in determining how well he or she handles hearing loss.  Someone who is passive and has never had a lot of self-confidence is likely to become more quickly withdrawn than someone who is an assertive, or even aggressive, type of individual.  The perception of need is also important, accepting that it’s okay to get help, that hearing loss does not make him weak or “less than”.  But some seniors are content with their situations, their connections, and therefore are in no hurry to get hearing aids or undertake any other self-help types of activities to compensate for their hearing loss.  It is important for seniors to understand the impact that their hearing loss has on others as well, on their families and friends who can feel very frustrated when trying to communicate too.  A senior’s “knowledge base” is another factor that contributes to how he or she will handle a hearing loss.  There is a lot of misinformation about hearing aids and cochlear implants which could shape a  senior’s attitude towards getting help.  An understanding of options is important, and whether or not there are resources within their communities.

Solutions

There are 4 A’s to consider:  Amplification, Advocacy, Assistive listening devices, and Alternatives.  Seniors need to know the sources for financial assistance for hearing aids if they need it, and audiologists need to be more vigilant and honest in the way they fit seniors for hearing aids.  Seniors should also be kept up to date on hearing resources available in theatres and  movies, how to use captioning on television, how to develop better communication strategies with their families and friends.

If you would like to e-chat with Sheila Adams about the impact of hearing loss on seniors, you can reach her at Sheila_ci777@yahoo.com.

Hearing Loss Association America Response to NYC Police Department Ban on Hearing Aids

July 7, 2011 in Advocacy & Access

1.        NY City Forces Retirement of Police Officers Wearing Hearing Aids
From the blog of Lise Hamlin, Director of Public Policy at Hearing Loss Association of America
 

In an article published June 19, 2011, (http://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/20/nyregion/ny-enforces-ban-on-police-officers-using-hearing-aids.html) the New York Times reported the New York City police department has banned the use of hearing aids on the job. Two officers who were forced to retire because they did wear hearing aids on the job have filed a complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), saying that the policy is discriminatory toward people with hearing loss.

It appears that the NYC police department has a kind of “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy toward hearing aid wearers. According to the New York Times, Paul J. Browne, the department’s chief spokesman, said it was “not actively looking to see if people have hearing aids.” He does admit that the department has told officers to stop wearing the hearing aids once found. According to Dan Carione, one of the two officers who were forced to retire, the department is sending a message that if you step forward and make your use of hearing aids known, “it will end your career.”

Mr. Carione and his attorneys contacted HLAA soon after he learned the department’s policy last fall. HLAA has offered continuing support and information about hearing loss and employment issues as he works toward reinstatement.

 

2.       Response to the NY Times article by HLAA Executive Director Brenda Battat , published June 28, 2011

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/28/opinion/l28hearing.html?_r=1&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss

 

To the Editor:

Re “Ban on Hearing Aids is Forcing Out Veteran New York City Police Officers” (news article, June 19):

Hearing Loss is a health issue that has long been misunderstood and stigmatized in our society. Banning the use of hearing aids that help police officers to function at their best is inconceivable and perpetuates the myths and stereotypes that are still prevalent about hearing loss today.

More important, it puts both the police officer and the public at risk when those who have admitted their hearing loss, sought treatment for it, and can function well with a hearing aid are forced to hide their hearing loss for fear of losing their jobs.

For more than twenty years the Americans with Disabilities Act has provided equal opportunity in the workplace. Banning young police officers from using the excellent hearing aids available today and forcing older police officers with hearing aids to retire is discriminating. As long as they can pass the hearing test with their hearing aids in they should be allowed to use them on the job.

Brenda Battat,

Bethesda, MD, June 21, 2011

The writer is the executive director of Hearing Loss Association of America, a national membership organization of and for people with hearing loss.

Hearing Aids

July 7, 2011 in Technology

Hearing Aids: What You Should Know Before You Buy!

  1. See your doctor first unless you have had a physical within the last 6 months. Some hearing aid specialists will ask you to sign a medical waiver in order to speed up the process of hearing aid sales.  This is not in your best interest.
  2. Check out the business selling hearing aids by contacting your local Better Business Bureau, consumer protection agency, or state attorney general.
  3. Know the difference between Audiologists and hearing aid dealers! Today, Audiologists require an Au.D., Doctor of Audiology, to certify. (This is NOT an M.D., however!).  Most have at least a Masters in Audiology, and they provide diagnostic audiological services.  They also have training in areas such as  listening/communication strategies and the perception of sound.  Hearing aid dealers become experts in hearing aid technology through numerous courses and apprenticeships with other hearing aid dealers.  Both are in the business of selling hearing aids.  What matters most is that the professional you choose is knowledgeable, ethical and provides a patient-driven service rather than a sales-driven service.
  4. Take someone with you when you go for your hearing aid evaluation who will take notes for you.  The results of the hearing test and the options for hearing aids can be confusing.
  5. Beware of ‘the deal’! If the Audiologist or dealer  tries to pressure you with promises like  ‘10% discount’, ‘$1,000 off’, ‘a lifetime of free follow-up visits’, ‘a lifetime of free batteries’, etc., this is a good indication that he or she is sales-driven.  Many are under contract to sell a certain number of hearing aids a year, putting their own interests ahead of yours.
  6. Take advantage of the 30 day trial period. In Virginia, you can return the hearing aids at the end of that time if you are not happy with them.
  7. Ask about fees for returning the aids. Each dispenser has his or her own business policies regarding the fee for returning them – it can be anywhere from 4% to 20% of the cost of the hearing aid.
  8. Please remember:
    • Hearing aids do NOT stop hearing loss.
    • Hearing aids will NOT restore your hearing to normal.
    • ALL Audiologists and dealers will provide free hearing aid adjustments during the trial period.
    • There is NO BEST HEARING AID because everyone’s hearing loss is different; what works for one person might not work for someone else.
    • You own your audiogram, be sure your specialist gives it to you.
    • A hearing aid should fit comfortably and not whistle.
    • No hearing aid cuts out background noise, but it can be made more tolerable.
  9. Ask about the telecoil – is it appropriate for your hearing loss. The telecoil is a small magnetic coil inside the hearing aid that bypasses background noise when you are using the telephone or an assistive listening device.  It is a very valuable feature and you can activate it with the push of a button.

Articles related to Hearing Aids

NVRC Related Fact Sheets

♦♦♦♦

If you have a complaint contact:

Better Business Bureau
1411 K Street NW, 10th Floor
Washington, DC  20005-3404
202-393-8000 phone
202-393-1198 fax
info@dc.bbb.org email
www.dc.bbb.org

Virginia Dept. of Professional
and Occumpational Regulation
3600 West Broad Street
Richmond, VA  23230
804-367-8500 phone
804-367-9753 tty
804-367-2475 fax
hearingaidspec@dpor.virginia.gov email
www.dpor.va.gov

 

NVRC Fact Sheets

July 5, 2011 in Education & Outreach

NVRC Fact Sheets are downloadable PDF documents. 

Hearing Loss

Hearing Aids

Caregivers and Parent Resources

Hearing Dogs

Cochlear Implants

Assistive Listening Devices and Technology

How to File a Closed Captioned Complaint

Interpreters and Transliterators

The following Tip Sheets are from the ADA Information Center:
           www.adainfo.org and the DOJ’s ADA website:

The following Standard Practice Papers are from the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf (RID):

Technology Fact Sheets

Phones

  •  Ameriphone VCO
  • CapTel Phone
  • Clarity Cordless Phones
  • Crystal Tone Phone

Signaling Devices

  • Alert Master Combination 
  • Baby Crying Signaler
  • Ringmax Amplified Ringer
  • Shake Awake Vibrating Alarm Clock
  • Smoke Alarms
  • Sonic Alert Door Bell Signaler
  • Sonic Boom Alarm Clock and Bed Shaker

Amplifiers

  •  In-Line Amplifier for Phones
  • Portable Telephone Amplifiers
  • UniVox 2A+ Home Cushion Loop Amplifier 
  • PockeTalker

Music and Television

  • Music Link
  • Music Link Dual
  • Neck Loop and T-Links
  • Television Devices

TTY Devices

  • TTY Ultratec Superprint
  • Uniphone TTY and Amplified Phone

Loan2Own Program

 

NAD Files Lawsuit to Make “Family-Friendly” Resort Accessible

July 1, 2011 in Advocacy & Access

NAD Files Lawsuit to Make “Family-Friendly” Resort Accessible  Friday 7/01/2011

The National Association of the Deaf (NAD), Vargas & Stein, LLP and Chason, Rosner, Leary & Marshall filed a lawsuit against Great Wolf Resorts, Inc. in the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia. Great Wolf Resorts, Inc, a national chain of indoor water parks, offers different forms of entertainment including a popular attraction, “MagiQuest”, which is described on its website as a “live-action adventure game in which a player goes up to a station and waves an electronic wand in order to trigger an auditory-based clue to locate the next station.”

When Plaintiff K.M., a deaf child, visited a Great Wolf Lodge in Williamsburg, Virginia, she was not able to participate in the interactive game with her hearing siblings. Similarly, co-Plaintiff Suzanne Rosen Singleton, a deaf mother, was barred from providing support to her hearing children in figuring out the clues. Great Wolf Lodge also features storytelling puppet shows that rely heavily on audio.
More at: http://www.nad.org/news/2011/7/nad-files-lawsuit-make-%E2%80%9Cfamily-friendly%E2%80%9D-resort-accessible