deaf - Archive

NVAD Workshop on Medicare: Saturday, Oct. 1

September 27, 2016 in Community Events, Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

Come join us to learn about the ABCs of Medicare! Learn about Low Income Subsidy Programs! Learn how to Protect Yourself from Medicare Fraud!

JulieAnn Chavez Medicare Benefits Specialist

DATE: Saturday, October 1, 2016 10:00AM to 12:00PM
PLACE: Northern Virginia Resource Center (NVRC) 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130 Fairfax, VA 22030

For more information, contact NVAD President Donna Graff-Viall: 571-766-0671 (VP) or missgraffie@gmail.com (email)

DOWNLOAD – nvad-workshop_saturday-october-1-2016

Happy Hands Luncheon Event+CPR Training-Oct 5th

September 27, 2016 in Community Events, Happy Hands

 

 

Presentation: CPR Training by Jennifer Fraserhappyhand-logo-607x260
Dates: Wednesday, October 5, 2016
Time: 10:00 AM – 2:00 PM
Place: Northern Virginia Resource Center,
3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, Virginia 22030

DOWNLOAD-CPR_event_flyer-10052016

WEBINAR “Working Memory, Part II: Strategies for Children Who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing “

September 8, 2016 in Community News

 

 

Outreach Services, VSDB Wednesday Webinar
Sept. 28, 2016, 4:00- 5:00 PM EDT

Working Memory, Part II: Strategies for Children Who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing
Presenter:Johnett Scogin, M.Ed. 

Please register for Working Memory, Part II: Strategies for Children Who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing webinar at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6728744357838753538

Presenter:  Johnett Scogin has worked in the field of Deaf Education for many years as a teacher and reading specialist.   She is currently working at the Texas School for the Deaf as Supervisor of Curriculum.

No prerequisites for this webinar: This webinar follows the Spring, 2016 webinar in which Dr. Daniel Koo of Gallaudet University presented his research on working memory of children who are deaf or hard of hearing.  Attendance at Dr. Koo’s webinar is not a prerequisite for this webinar.

Webinar Description:  Evidence suggests that challenged working memory skills create a high risk factor for educational underachievement, and that working memory impacts all areas of learning and thinking.  Ms. Scogin will briefly review the function of working memory in daily life and academics, and discuss how one might identify children with challenges in this area.  She will then share ideas for setting up the learning environment to support working memory, and strategies to help facilitate and accommodate working memory performance.

Target Audience: Teachers and related service providers working with students who are deaf or hard of hearing; family members.

This Webinar is sponsored by Outreach Services, Virginia School for the Deaf and the Blind in Staunton, through grant funding from the Virginia Department of Education.  Questions should be directed to Dr. Debbie Pfeiffer at : Debbie.pfeiffer@vsdb.k12.va.us

After registering, you will receive an email confirmation with connection information for joining the webinar.

Washington Society of Jewish Deaf 11th Annual ASL High Holy Days

September 8, 2016 in Community Events

 

Register now under the Early Bird rate until September 16!

Join us for Erev Rosh Hashanah Dinner hosted
by Hillel at Gallaudet!
Open to students, faculty, staff,
and the WSJD Community
$ 25.00 per person
$ 36.00 per adult per holiday service.
One price for two Rosh Hashanah services.
One price for Yom Kippur service and break fast.

To learn more and to register for as many events, click here.
SERVICE SCHEDULE
Erev Rosh Hashanah
Sunday, October 2
Gallaudet University – Foster Auditorium

Dinner: 5:00 p.m.    Service: 7:15 p.m.

Rosh Hashanah Morning Service, 

Luncheon and Discussion Session
Adat Shalom Reconstructionist Congregation

Monday, October 3, 10:00 a.m.

Yom Kippur Service and Break Fast
Adat Shalom Reconstructionist Congregation

Wednesday, October 12, 5:30 p.m.

COME AND JOIN US…
If you want to participate in the ASL High Holy Day services,
click here to fill out the survey.
Washington Society of Jewish Deaf | wsjd01@gmail.com |www.wsjdeaf.org

After Deaf Man Is Killed by Cop in Traffic Stop, How Drivers With Hearing Loss Can Stay Safe

August 25, 2016 in Community News

 

by Inside Edition
August 24, 2016

The recent fatal shooting of a deaf driver by a police officer in North Carolina has raised questions about safety for hearing impaired motorists.

Jennifer Labriola, the principal of the New York School for the Deaf who drives to work each day, told Inside Edition through a sign language interpreter that if a hearing impaired driver is pulled over, “you tell the police officer you’re deaf and ‘I need to write this down.’ You point to your ear.”

She added: “It’s important to wait for your instructions and not do anything. Just wait and see. When they ask for my license and registration, at that point, I would take out the items asked for.”

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Related Information to Keep you Safe
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Virginia Visor Card
 Visor Card Information
The NVRC Office has these cards available

So if Beethoven was completely deaf, how did he compose?

August 18, 2016 in Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

Classic FM
The worlds Greatest Music
By Rob Weinberg,
17th August 2016

Ludwig was still pumping out the masterpieces – even when he was completely deaf. Here’s how he did it.

“For the last three years my hearing has grown steadily weaker…” – so wrote Beethoven, aged 30, in a letter to a friend.

The young Beethoven was known as the most important musician since Mozart. By his mid-20s, he had studied with Haydn and was celebrated as a brilliant, virtuoso pianist.

Beethoven’s life timeline: 1770 – 1802 >

By the time he turned 30 he had composed a couple of piano concertos, six string quartets, and his first symphony. Everything was looking pretty good for the guy, with the prospect of a long, successful career ahead.

Then, he started to notice a buzzing sound in his ears  . . .

Read more  . . . Beethoven

SoundSense is a simple, open-source gadget that helps deaf people

July 28, 2016 in Hearing Loss & Deafness, Technology

 

 

Furenexo’s SoundSense is a simple, open-source gadget that helps deaf people stay aware of their surroundings

Tech Crunch
Posted 
by Devin Coldewey, Contributor

People with deafness have plenty of ways to navigate everyday situations as if they had no disability at all, but there are still situations that present dangers unique to them — not being able to hear a smoke alarm or gunshot, for instance. SoundSense is a small wearable device that listens for noises that might require immediate attention and alerts the user when it detects one.

“There’s really been an absence of innovation in technology for disabilities over the last decade or even decades,” said Brian Goral, co-founder and CEO of Furenexo, the company behind SoundSense. We talked a few weeks before today’s launch. “What we’re looking to do is bring technology that’s taken for granted, things like cell phones and driverless cars, and apply that to the disability space.”

This first device is small and simple for a reason — the company is bootstrapped and has to rely on Kickstarter for the funds to make the SoundSense. They’re also looking for grants from non-profit entities and perhaps government funds.

Read More  . . . . SoundSense

Related Links:

motherboard.vice.com

 

Auditory cortex nearly identical in hearing and deaf people

July 21, 2016 in Research

 

Study shows architecture of audition likely based on innate factors

Harvard Gazette
By Peter Reuell, Harvard Staff Writer
July 18, 2016

The neural architecture in the auditory cortex — the part of the brain that processes sound — is virtually identical in profoundly deaf and hearing people, a new study has found.

The study raises a host of new questions about the role of experience in processing sensory information, and could point the way toward potential new avenues for intervention in deafness. The study is described in a June 18 paper published in Scientific Reports.

The paper was written by Ella Striem-Amit, a postdoctoral researcher in Alfonso Caramazza’s Cognitive Neuropsychology Laboratory at Harvard, Mario Belledonne from Harvard, Jorge Almeida from the University of Coimbra, and Quanjing Chen, Yuxing Fang, Zaizhu Han, and Yanchao Bi from Beijing Normal University.

Read more  . . . auditory cortex

Detroit Deaf Heritage Book – by Kathleen Brockway

July 21, 2016 in Community News

detroitDeafHeritage

Discover the History of Detroit’s Deaf Heritage
Deaf author releases second book feattuing stunning, vintage images

Telling a story in pictures is Detroit’s Deaf Heritage, the newest addition to Arcadia Publishing’s popular Images of America series. The book by author Kathleen Brockway, who was recently inducted into the Susan M. Daniels Disability Mentoring Hall of Fame, is set to release on June 20, 2016. The book boasts 200 vintage images, many of which have never been published, and chronicles the deaf community in the Michigan city.

Download Press Release Detroit Deaf Heritage

Learn more  . . . . Detroit’s Deaf Heritage

KathleenBrockway

Deaf people encounter troubles with medical care

July 14, 2016 in Community News

 

The Sacramento Bee | Sacbee.com
BY CLAUDIA BUCK
JULY 11, 2016

When you’re hospitalized or in pain, understanding a doctor’s diagnosis or a nurse’s instructions is hard enough. But when you’re deaf, it can feel like being shut out.

Ellen Thielman, a retired computer programmer, found that out twice this year. Deaf since infancy, the Sacramento resident has navigated the hearing world for years – graduating from college, raising two children and working more than 20 years for several California state government departments.

But when Thielman, 67, landed in the emergency room last January with what she thought might be symptoms of a stroke, she was frustrated by the lack of adequate sign-language interpreters and her inability to effectively talk with medical staff.

“I was furious, upset and a bit traumatized. I felt really alone,” said Thielman, who lives independently but needs a service dog to hear even her own doorbell.

Thielman wasn’t misdiagnosed, mistreated or given improper medications. Still, in two emergency room visits and subsequent hospital stays this year at Mercy General Hospital in Sacramento, she said she frequently felt isolated and unsure why she was getting certain injections or exactly what her medical status was. Both times, she said, it took three to four hours for a trained interpreter to arrive in the emergency room. Later, in the hospital, she was unable to schedule an interpreter to meet with her doctors.

During her multi-night hospital stays, her primary means of conversation was to scribble back-and-forth notes with her nurses and doctors.

 

Read more  . . . medical care

Tuning in to deaf needs

July 7, 2016 in Hearing Loss & Deafness, Research

 

 

SCIENCE
By Jyoti Madhusoodanan

Peter Hauser Photo Credit: M. Benjamin

Peter Hauser Photo Credit: M. Benjamin

It’s a team sport, but indoor polo doesn’t take much talking—which helped make it an instant fit for Peter Hauser. During his freshman year of college, a few horse hours were a weekly routine: polo three times a week, together with training ponies or coaching local students in the sport. But Hauser had a stronger motivation than his love of the game: The horses didn’t expect him to hear them.

At the age of 5, a bout of spinal meningitis left Hauser completely deaf. While in middle school, he attempted to use cochlear implants—considered an experimental treatment at the time—but the prosthetics proved ineffective. The procedures and monitoring nonetheless had an upside: They provided his earliest experiences working with researchers, which helped him become interested in pursuing science himself.

Hauser had a longstanding interest in human psychology. As a deaf student, however, he didn’t think he could work with people as research subjects, so he chose to major in animal sciences instead. But when his advanced courses proved challenging, he began taking evening sign language classes at a community college so that he could use an interpreter to keep up—he had relied on lip-reading up to that point—and the decision was life-changing.

Read Article  . . . Tuning in to deaf needs

Supreme Court Takes Up Deaf Texans’ Suit Against State

June 30, 2016 in Advocacy & Access, Disability Law

 

“This has the potential to be a landmark decision for deaf rights and indeed for all disability rights,” 

– Wayne Krause Yang, legal director of the Texas Civil Rights Project

The Texas Tribune
by Aneri Pattani
June 30, 2016

A group of deaf Texans fighting what they claim is discriminatory treatment is hoping the U.S. Supreme Court will step in and force the state to provide sign-language interpreters at classes young drivers must take to get licenses.

The high court on Tuesday agreed to hear the case, Ivy v. Morath, involving a group of deaf Texans who sued the state in 2011. The state requires first-time driver’s license applicants under age 25 to take classes that are typically conducted by private companies. The suit argues that since Texas requires the classes, it should make sure there are interpreters for deaf students.

Read More  . . .  deaf Texans

No handicap: Deaf swimmer finishes 6th in trials race

June 28, 2016 in Community News

 

 

– Associated PressMark_Titus
June 27, 2016

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) – When Marcus Titus is gliding through the water, his head bobbing up and down, he doesn’t hear the roar of the crowd.

Or anything else, for that matter.

Deaf since birth, Titus swims in a quiet isolation that he believes actually gives him an edge over those in the other lanes, who can hear everything going on around them.

“I don’t have to hear the crowd, the noises, the distractions,” Titus said. “I can just focus on my race.”

Now, Titus is serving as an inspiration to others with so-called disabilities. He made it all the way to the 100-meter breaststroke final at the U.S. swimming trials, but finished sixth Monday night to fall short of his first Olympics at age 30.

Read More  . . . Deaf swimmer

Cards assist law enforcement, drivers with hearing loss

June 23, 2016 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

Mich_Police_cards

The communication card is designed to be stored on a sun visor, in a bag or backpack, or on a passenger seat for easy use. To download the card, visit www.michigan.gov/doddbhh. (Image provided by the Michigan Department of Civil Rights)

C&G Newspapers – METRO DETROIT
Posted June 22, 2016

METRO DETROIT — The Michigan Department of Civil Rights has released a new communication tool that will ease communication between law enforcement and individuals who are deaf or have partial hearing loss.

Supported by statewide law enforcement organizations — including the Michigan State Police, the Michigan Sheriffs’ Association and the Michigan Association of Chiefs of Police — the communication card is designed to be stored on a sun visor, in a bag or backpack, or on a passenger seat for easy use.

One side of the card notifies law enforcement that the person is either deaf or has partial hearing loss. It offers quick tips to facilitate communication, including, but not limited to, “Get my attention first,” “Make eye contact when you speak,” and “I cannot lip-read everything you say.”

Read more . . . Cards

 

 

SERTOMA GRANT OPENS NEW DOORS AT ASPEN DEAF CAMP

June 23, 2016 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

The energetic youthful campers at the Aspen Camp in Snowmass, Colorado, partake in a wide variety of team building and outdoor activities that have been funded by generous donations, and grants from organizations such as Sertoma. Sertoma’s recent grant helped Aspen Camp fund new scholarships and camp activities.

June 17, 2016

Ah, the sweet essence and experience of summer camp. It is place where freedom and adventure intertwine, new relationships grow and comfort zones dissolve.

For those attending Aspen Camp in Snowmass, Colorado, it is a special opportunity for both Deaf* children and Deaf* adults to explore new realms, relationships and the outdoors.

Read more  . . . about Deaf Camp