conversation - Archive

Cued Speech

March 29, 2011 in Interpreting & Transliterating

Cued Speech is a mode of communication based on the phonemes and properties of traditionally spoken languages. Cueing allows users who are deaf or hard of hearing or who have language/communication disorders to access the basic, fundamental properties of spoken languages through the use of vision.(taken from the National Cued Speech Association’s website)    

Below is a list of local Cued Speech Transliterators who provide services in the metro DC area:

Ashley Elder
Email: ashrenee85@gmail.com
Phone: (571) 318-3491

Nichelle Wilson
Email: mrs_njwilson@yahoo.com
Phone: (571) 426-3747



National Cued Speech Association Logo

National Cued Speech Association
5619 McLean Drive
Bethesda, MD 20814-1021

Toll Free: 800-459-3529
Local: 301-915-8009
Email: info@cuedspeech.org

 

Margie and Luke are back on the Amazing Race!!

March 17, 2011 in Community Events

Name (Age): Margie Adams (53)
Hometown: Colorado Springs, Colo.
Connection to your Teammate: Mother
Current Occupation: RN, BSN, Clinical Research Associate
Previous Season/Result: Season 14/3rd placeBiggest mistake you made in your previous season: Not drinking enough water and becoming dehydrated in Thailand. I fainted.Most memorable moment from your first Race: Finishing in first place for the first leg of the Race.

Favorite place you visited on your first season: Thailand, it was number one on my wish list for Season 14 so getting to go to both Bangkok and Phuket was fantastic.

Why do you want to run the Race again? It was one of the most exciting and best experiences of my life. I am looking forward to all the new places we will go.

How have you changed since the last time you competed? I am more confident and more willing to try new things.

What are you passionate about? People being kind and accepting of each other

People would be surprised to learn: Nothing, I’m pretty boring.

One location that you hope to go on this adventure: Ireland, my grandparents are from there and I would love to see the country.

Biggest challenge you and your teammate will face on the Race together: Some of the challenges require you to be able to listen/hear/sign and when those challenges come up we have to pick the other challenge since Luke is completely deaf. He cannot hear or use oral language.

What do you hope to accomplish by running the Race again (other than winning one million dollars): Getting to spend time one-on-one with Luke

Pet peeve about your teammate: He is a very loud eater.

What would you do if you won the million dollars? Retire a few years earlier than planned.

Any strategic changes you will make heading into this Race: We need to be more careful about reading the clues.

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Name (Age): Luke Adams (25)
Hometown: Colorado Springs, Colo.
Connection to your Teammate: Son
Current Occupation: Motivational Speaker
Previous Season/Result: Season 14/3rd place

Biggest mistake you made in your previous season: My biggest mistake was not being able to figure out what the last surfboard was during the final challenge!

Most memorable moment from your first Race: The hilarious cheese hill task and the underwear marathon.

Favorite place you visited on your first season: Thailand because the country and culture are just so beautiful. I would love to go there again someday.

Why do you want to run the Race again? To win The Amazing Race! I want to make up for my big blunder in the final leg of the last race.

How have you changed since the last time you competed? I stop more when I am traveling now to enjoy the scenery. I try not to rush things.

What are you passionate about? Travel, my family and friends.

People would be surprised to learn: I’m afraid of flying. I always have to suck it up whenever I’m on planes.

One location that you hope to go on this adventure: Ireland, because it would be awesome to see where my family came from.

Biggest challenge you and your teammate will face on the Race together: Being sleep deprived!

What do you hope to accomplish by running the Race again (other than winning one million dollars): It would be cool if we could visit five continents, avoid being u-turned and be the first team to make it to the final three twice!

Pet peeve about your teammate: Nothing — she is an awesome teammate and mom!

What would you do if you won the million dollars? Invest.

Any strategic changes you will make heading into this Race: I don’t think I will change anything since our strategy from last time worked well. Hopefully it will bring us to the final three again and we can win this time!

 
 
 
 

Marlee Matlin on Celebrity Apprentice

March 17, 2011 in Community Events

Starring in “Children of a Lesser God” at age 21, Marlee Matlin became the youngest recipient of the Best Actress Oscar and one of only four actresses to receive that honor for a film debut. Born and raised in Morton Grove, Illinois, Matlin started acting at the age of seven in the role of Dorothy in “The Wizard of Oz” at a children’s theatre company in Chicago. She was discovered in a Chicago stage production of “Children of a Lesser God.” She was then selected to star in the film version.Matlin made her TV debut in CBS’ “Bridge to Silence.” She went on to star for two seasons in the series “Reasonable Doubts.” She was twice nominated for both a Golden Globe as well as a People’s Choice Award. Matlin was nominated for two Emmys for her guest turns on “Seinfeld” and “Picket Fences.” Matlin also starred in “Against Her Will: The Carrie Buck Story,” a movie for Lifetime Television, for which she was nominated for a CableACE Award for Best Actress in a Movie or Mini-Series. She broke down yet another barrier with the role, playing a character who wasn’t deaf. Matlin returned to CBS’ “Picket Fences” to reprise her Emmy-nominated role. Coincidentally, her character on “Picket Fences” gave birth on the same day she gave birth in real life, a feat repeated exactly 43 years to the day by Lucille Ball on “I Love Lucy” on the same network, CBS.

For seven seasons, Matlin starred as pollster Joey Lucas, on NBC’s Emmy Award winning series “The West Wing.” She received her third Emmy Award nomination for her work on ABC’s “The Practice,” and guest starred on NBC’s “Law and Order: SVU,” receiving a fourth Emmy nomination for her work. In 2007, she joined the cast of Showtime’s “The L Word.” She returned for a second season in 2008. Most recently, Matlin competed on Season 6 of “Dancing with the Stars.”

Matlin published a novel for children entitled “Deaf Child Crossing” in 2002, followed by “Nobody’s Perfect,” in summer 2006, and “Leading Ladies” in 2007. She has appeared on Sesame Street. She has also performed “The Star-Spangled Banner” in sign language for two Super Bowls.

In 1994, Matlin was appointed by President Clinton and confirmed by the Senate to the Board of Directors for the Corporation for National Service. In 1995, Matlin served as Chairperson for National Volunteer Week, and was honored in a White House Rose Garden ceremony by the President.

Matlin serves as a national spokesperson for The American Red Cross. In 1992, she was instrumental in getting Congress to pass federal legislation requiring all TVs manufactured in the U.S. be equipped with closed-captioning technology. She serves on the boards of a number of charitable organizations. She has also combined her charity work with commercial ventures and has appeared in numerous commercials and public service announcements, on behalf of corporate sponsors such as Target, Sprint, and Toys R Us, each designed to raise awareness about the importance of donating to charitable organizations. In 2006, Matlin was honored by America Online as Chief Everything Officer, highlighting the important contributions of mothers in both home and work environments.

In April 2009, Matlin released her bestselling memoir “I’ll Scream Later,” published by Simon and Shuster. Currently, Matlin is developing a half-hour comedy for Showtime with writer/producer Carol Leifer.

Matlin makes her home in the greater Los Angeles area. She and her husband have four children.

 

Restaurant Survey Results

March 1, 2011 in Education & Outreach, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

We are excited to have so many participants sharing their experiences.  Because of the large amount of information, we have changed our format and put the results in a PDF spread sheet. 

 

Restaurant Survey

February 27, 2011 in Hearing Loss & Deafness, NVRC Announcements

Conversation Impossible

 

Do you enjoy checking out new neighborhood restaurants? Are you a person who can’t wait to visit a restaurant that got a good review to learn whether its cuisine really is the best?

You eagerly make your reservation and arrive full of anticipation, mouth watering as you read the tempting menu…but then, like many of us with a hearing loss, find having a conversation almost impossible.

Yes, the food is great, the atmosphere is lovely, your dinner companion is delightful, but it takes herculean effort to speech read. 

Only through sheer concentration do you catch the drift of the conversation and you leave exhausted and frustrated. Washington Post food critic Tom Sietsema’s restaurant reviews give information about the decibel level. This is useful information, but more specifics would be helpful for those of us who contend with hearing loss. For instance, how busy and how loud does it get at lunch time? Are there good sound absorbing materials on the walls and floors? Is a booth available that gives better acoustics or an area in the restaurant that is quieter?

Although we can’t change the restaurant environment, it would be helpful to know what to expect once we get there.

This is where we need your help, and your opinion matters!

Share with us your experience by clicking on the link below or the Restaurant Survey button on our home page. Answer five short questions and then rate the restaurant racket!

NVRC will compile the reviews and make them available through our website, so be sure to check back often.

Mission Accomplished?
Finished dining and ready to
fill out the survey?

two spies

Click here to link to the Survey

Click here for Survey Updates

For restaurant communication tips, check the NVRC fact sheet:

RestaurantStrategies 5-08

Articles:
Restaurant Noise
Restaurant Acoustics
Noise in Restaurants: Consumers Sound Off

Free Tax Assistance

February 7, 2011 in NVRC Announcements

 

NVRC  has once again joined the Real Economic Impact Tour’s DeafTax VITA Project to bring free income tax preparation and electronic filing to people who use American Sign Language as their primary language.Deaf and Hard of Hearing tax payers can meet with IRS Certified VITA volunteers through the videophone here at NVRC.Individuals and families who earn $49,000 or less (without business income) are eligible for this service.  All tax preparation is by appointment only, and will be available from February 1 to April 19, 2011.  There is no cost for this service. What to bring:

  • Social Security cards for everyone listed on tax return.
  • Two forms of ID for primary taxpayer and spouse (one must be photo ID.)
  • Birthdates of all individuals to appear on return.
  • All W-2s and 1099s and any other income reporting documents.
  • Documentation for all deductions and/or credits claimed, i.e. education credits.
  • Documentation supporting a claim to a dependency exemption (for example, Form 8332 or Form 2120)
  • Day care provider’s identifying number and receipts (if applicable)
  • Bank routing and account numbers for direct deposit
  • A copy of last year’s federal and state returns (if available)

For more information, click here.

To make an appointment, contact NVRC at:

info@nvrc.org
703-352-9055 voice
703-352-9056 TTY
703-350-8656 VP