Cochler - Archive

MRIs may be too painful for some with cochlear implants

December 1, 2014 in Community News

 

 

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machines may displace the magnets of cochlear implants or cause extreme discomfort for some wearers, according to a new study.

More than 300,000 people worldwide now have a cochlear implant, a small electronic device with an external transmitter held in place behind the ear with a magnet and an internal electrode array. The devices can help restore a sense of hearing to the profoundly deaf, according to the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders.

“There have been several reports of adverse events, such as magnet displacement and polarity changes, following MRI in patients with cochlear implants,” said senior author Dr. Jae Young Choi of the Department of Otorhinolaryngology at Yonsei University College of Medicine in Seoul, South Korea. “The exposure of the internal magnet to a strong electromagnetic field can induce significant magnetic forces and cause displacement of the implant.”

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The Best Books for Kids with Hearing Loss

August 26, 2014 in Families, Hearing Loss & Deafness

HubPages.com

Finding great books about children who are deaf or hard of hearing can be difficult. Many books are out of date with current technology, or are targeted to an adult audience. As the mother to a five year old boy who wears hearing aids, I was disappointed to find outdated books about hearing loss in our local library. One book described a boy as having “weird words” and another featured a girl wearing an outdated body-worn hearing aid system from the 1970’s. Fortunately, there are many new, wonderful books that explore current technology and provide a positive outlook for children with hearing loss. Books with an auditory/verbal approach (containing references to hearing aids, cochlear implants, and “learning to listen”) are listed in the first section. Books about ASL and Deaf culture are listed in the second section. See listed books

Indiana University researchers study cognitive risks in children with cochlear implants

May 29, 2014 in Hearing Loss & Deafness, Research

 

 

IUSM Newsroom
May 22, 2014
Source: http://news.medicine.iu.edu/releases/2014/05/cochlear.shtml

INDIANAPOLIS — Children with profound deafness who receive a cochlear implant had as much as five times the risk of having delays in areas of working memory, controlled attention, planning and conceptual learning as children with normal hearing, according to Indiana University research published May 22 in the Journal of the American Medical Association Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery.

The authors evaluated 73 children implanted before age 7 and 78 children with normal hearing to determine the risk of deficits in executive functioning behaviors in everyday life.

Executive functioning, a set of mental processes involved in regulating and directing thinking and behavior, is important for focusing and attaining goals in daily life. All children in the study had average to above-average IQ scores. The results, reported in “Neurocognitive Risk in Children With Cochlear Implants,” are the first from a large-scale study to compare real-world executive functioning behavior in children with cochlear implants and those with normal hearing.

A cochlear implant device consists of an external component that processes sound into electrical signals that are sent to an internal receiver and electrodes that stimulate the auditory nerve. Although the device restores the ability to perceive many sounds to children who are born deaf, some details and nuances of hearing are lost in the process.

First author William Kronenberger, Ph.D., professor of clinical psychology in psychiatry at the IU School of Medicine and a specialist in neurocognitive and executive function testing, said that delays in executive functioning have been commonly reported by parents and others who work with children with cochlear implants. Based on these observations, his group sought to evaluate whether elevated risks of delays in executive functioning in children with cochlear implants exist, and what components of executive functioning were affected.

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