Closed Captions - Archive

Minnesota’s New Closed Captioning Law Takes Effect

August 4, 2016 in Captioning / Relay, Legislation

 

August 1, 2016
Commission of Deaf, DeafBlind & Hard of Hearing Minnesotans Bulletin

Good news!  Starting today, August 1st, Minnesota’s new closed captioning law goes into effect.  As of now, closed captioning is required to be kept on at all times in certain medical facilities.

The law applies to waiting rooms in hospitals, surgical centers, birth centers and some group homes.  The group homes affected are those that provide housing, meals and services to five or more people who are developmentally or physically disabled, chemically dependent or mentally ill.

Read more  . . . or view Signed/Captioned Video

Google Glass App Gives Conversations Real-Time Closed Captioning

October 6, 2014 in Technology

 

GIZMODO
Robert Sorokanich
10/04/14

Georgia Tech researchers have come up with an app that turns Google Glass into a real-time closed-captioning display for the hearing-impaired, using the voice recognition in the user’s Glass-paired smartphone. Now this is a face-computer use we can get behind.

Captioning on Glass uses a Glass wearer’s smartphone as a remote microphone. The Glass wearer simply hands his or her phone to the other person in the conversation, and the smartphone’s mic picks up what the other person is saying. Nearly instantly, a transcription shows up on the Glass display.

Naturally, for the deaf or hearing-impaired, this is a fantastic application. And the research team is working on an even more broadly-applicable integration, a two-way translation featurethat could instantly caption conversations in English, Spanish, French, Russian, Korean or Japanese.

The one drawback of this setup: It requires the Glass wearer to hand over his or her smartphone to the other person in the conversation, perhaps not the best idea when talking to strangers. But the benefit this could present for day-to-day communication among trusted peers is phenomenal. [Captioning on Glass via CNet]

See Video  . . . 

 

How to enable subtitles and captioning for audio accessibility on iPhone or iPad

August 11, 2014 in Technology

 

 

How to turn on subtitles and closed captions in iOS

By Allyson Kazmucha,
Friday, Aug 8, 2014

There are lots of accessibility options available in iOS that makes using an iPhone or iPad easier for those with visual and hearing impairments. If you or someone you know suffers from auditory issues, one of those features is subtitles and closed captioning while watching videos. To use them, you’ve just got to enable them first.

Click Here to learn how

DOJ pushes rules for movie theaters on serving blind & deaf

July 29, 2014 in Captioning / Relay, Disability Law

 

 

The Hill
By Benjamin Goad
Article Source

The Justice Department moved Friday to open up the nation’s cinemas to the visually and hearing impaired with a slate of draft regulations requiring movie theaters to offer closed captioning and audio description technology. 

“This proposed rule will allow all Americans, including those with disabilities, to fully participate in the moviegoing experience,” Attorney General Eric Holder said in unveiling the plan.

The DOJ’s bid to amend the Americans with Disabilities Act comes four years after the agency signaled plans to move forward with new regulations, drawing more than 1,000 public comments. 

The agency is seeking to require all theaters with digital screens to comply with the new regulations six months after the rule is finalized. The proposal asks for comment on whether a four year compliance date is appropriate for theaters with analog screens, or whether regulations for those movie houses should be shelved until a later date. 

Estimates of the costs of the rule fall somewhere between $177.8 million and $225.9 million over 15 years, the agency said. 

Under the rules, captions would be delivered directly to the seat in a manner only visible to only a requesting patron. Audio description, transmitted via a wireless headset, allows individuals who are blind or have low vision “a spoken narration of important visual elements of a movie, such as actions, settings, facial expressions, costumes and scene changes.”

The Justice Department stressed that the regulations would . . .

Read more: http://thehill.com/regulation/213330-doj-pushes-new-movie-theater-rules-for-blind-and-deaf#ixzz38sEAlSwj
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