Classroom - Archive

What’s new? Hearing in the modern classroom

September 10, 2014 in Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

philly.com
Yell Inverso, Au.D., PhD., CCC-A
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2014
Article Source

Today’s guest blogger is Yell Inverso, Au.D., PhD., CCC-A a pediatric audiologist at Nemours/Alfred I duPont Hospital for Children.

Elementary school classroom are virtually unrecognizable these days compared to what most of us can recall. Gone are the neat rows of desks with children sitting forward-facing, alphabetically organized by last name. Modern classrooms now include pods of desks that foster student interaction, play and flexibility.

Sounds great, right? But what about a child who has hearing loss, an attention problem, or a learning disability? How do you recommend preferential seating when there is no longer a “front row”?  As a pediatric audiologist, I have to be more specific now with my academic recommendations. Teachers no longer stand and write on the blackboard, so we have to ensure that, regardless of where they are teaching in the room, a child has access to their voice no matter where they are sitting.

Classroom FM (Frequency Modulated) systems are a great place to start. These systems have different configurations and can help all children in the classroom, not just those with hearing loss. A child wearing hearing aids or a cochlear implant connects to the system via a small receiver, where the teacher’s voice transmits directly from a body-worn microphone. Additionally, FM systems can deliver the teacher’s voice to the child’s ear without being connected to a hearing aid. Speakers placed around the room can ensure that the teacher’s voice is reaching all children loud-and-clear no matter where they are sitting.

Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/blogs/healthy_kids/Whats-new-Hearing-in-the-Modern-Classroom.html#iz2oKv87013tPVwk.99

 

 

Judges in California Reverse Ruling Preventing CART in Classrooms

August 7, 2013 in Captioning / Relay, Community News, Disability Law

By Tim Hull, Courthouse News Service 8/6/2013

Two California school districts must face claims that they improperly denied transcription services to deaf and hard-of-hearing students, the 9th Circuit ruled Tuesday.

In separate cases consolidated for appeal, the parents of K.M. And D.H., two hard-of-hearing high-school girls, argued that the districts had violated federal law by refusing to approve a transcription service in the classroom. The Communication Access Realtime Translation service provides a word-for-word transcription of everything said in class via real-time captioning, according to the ruling.

Read more . . . →

AG Bell Association Information on Classroom Acoustics

March 29, 2013 in Hearing Loss & Deafness, Technology

Classroom Acoustics Information

From the Alexander Graham Bell Association www.agbell.org

As they age, buildings can only get noisier, not quieter – cracks form and widen, duct anchors come loose and vibrate, fans and belts begin to squeal. Whatever the mix of exterior and interior noise, the best retrofit solutions are the ones that counteract multiple sources at the same time.

Hiring a qualified acoustician who can help find those solutions is highly recommended, and can leverage all the other investments you make in an existing building. Learn more about reducing noise in learning spaces with the Alexander Graham Bell Association’s article, Reducing Noise in Learning Spaces at http://www.listeningandspokenlanguage.org/Document.aspx?id=185


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.