children - Archive

WEBINAR “Working Memory, Part II: Strategies for Children Who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing “

September 8, 2016 in Community News

 

 

Outreach Services, VSDB Wednesday Webinar
Sept. 28, 2016, 4:00- 5:00 PM EDT

Working Memory, Part II: Strategies for Children Who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing
Presenter:Johnett Scogin, M.Ed. 

Please register for Working Memory, Part II: Strategies for Children Who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing webinar at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6728744357838753538

Presenter:  Johnett Scogin has worked in the field of Deaf Education for many years as a teacher and reading specialist.   She is currently working at the Texas School for the Deaf as Supervisor of Curriculum.

No prerequisites for this webinar: This webinar follows the Spring, 2016 webinar in which Dr. Daniel Koo of Gallaudet University presented his research on working memory of children who are deaf or hard of hearing.  Attendance at Dr. Koo’s webinar is not a prerequisite for this webinar.

Webinar Description:  Evidence suggests that challenged working memory skills create a high risk factor for educational underachievement, and that working memory impacts all areas of learning and thinking.  Ms. Scogin will briefly review the function of working memory in daily life and academics, and discuss how one might identify children with challenges in this area.  She will then share ideas for setting up the learning environment to support working memory, and strategies to help facilitate and accommodate working memory performance.

Target Audience: Teachers and related service providers working with students who are deaf or hard of hearing; family members.

This Webinar is sponsored by Outreach Services, Virginia School for the Deaf and the Blind in Staunton, through grant funding from the Virginia Department of Education.  Questions should be directed to Dr. Debbie Pfeiffer at : Debbie.pfeiffer@vsdb.k12.va.us

After registering, you will receive an email confirmation with connection information for joining the webinar.

It takes teamwork: mainstreaming kids with hearing loss

August 18, 2016 in Advocacy & Access, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

Healthy Hearing
Contributed by Lisa Packer, staff writer, Healthy Hearing
Thursday, August 18th, 2016

Since the passage of the Individuals with Disabilities in Education Act (IDEA) in 1975, the number of children mainstreamed into public schools with hearing loss has increased dramatically. About 75 percent of children with hearing loss are now mainstreamed into public schools, and about half of those children spend the majority of the day in a “hearing” classroom.

When it comes to meeting the educational needs of a child who is deaf or has hearing loss, there are many different professionals who play a part in their success.

Read more  . . . teamwork

 

The ASL-Interpreted Performance of The Little Mermaid is July 10 at 4:00 p.m.

June 16, 2016 in Community News

 

Join us in The Anne M. and Theodore N. Lerner Family Theatre on 

Sunday, July 10 at 4:00 p.m.

ASL Interpreters: Aaron Halleck and Barbie Doty

Imagination Stage
4908 Auburn Avenue
Bethesda, MD 20814

About the Show:
 In this world premiere, faithful re-telling of the Hans Christian Andersen original, the Little Mermaid falls in love with a human Prince, and longs to join him in his world above the waves. Despite the warnings of her Mer-family, the Little Mermaid seeks out the Enchantress who trades her pair of legs for the mermaid’s beautiful singing voice. A follow-up to the highly acclaimed The Lion, The Witch & The Wardrobe (2012), this collaboration between Imagination Stage and The Washington Ballet features dance, puppets, music, and singing in a highly theatrical and epic style of performance. Best for Ages 5 To purchase tickets, please visit us  online, or call our box office at 301-280-1660. Please note that our staff is trained to receive calls through relay and VRS.

 

Imagination Stage offers discounted rates for groups of 10 or more. For more information, call group sales at 301-280-1664.

Born without hearing, an 11-year-old takes on the National Spelling Bee

May 26, 2016 in Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

Washington Post
By Joe Heim
May 24, 2016

As he walked out of his elementary school last week, fifth-grader Neil Maes heard the clapping from his fellow students lining both sides of the hallways. He heard them cheer and yell his name, and he heard them wish him luck as he headed off to compete in the Scripps National Spelling Bee, which starts Wednesday morning at the Gaylord National Resort and Convention Center in National Harbor, Md.

That the shy 11-year-old from Belton, S.C., can hear anything at all is a testament to technology, to a never-quit attitude and to faith, say his parents, Christy, a preschool teacher, and Peter, an aircraft mechanic.

The Maeses, who found out their son was severely hearing-impaired just days after he was born, have been working nonstop since then to help him have hearing that’s as close to normal as possible.

When the couple learned that their son couldn’t hear, they were in shock.

Read more  . . . Spelling Bee

To sign or not to sign? That’s the question facing deaf children

May 20, 2016 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness, Technology

 

 

The invention of cochlear implants and other technologies have given many deaf and hard-of-hearing adults and children the option to hear. What, then, becomes of sign language?

When the world gets too loud—because of fireworks, or just to take a quiet break on the weekends—8-year-old Sophie knows what to do.

“When it’s really loud, I just take the magnet off,” she says.

She’s deaf and has had a cochlear implant that’s helped her hear since she was a year old. But she knows by moving that magnet she can stop the device from bringing her sound.

More than 1 in 500 children in the United States is born deaf or hard of hearing, making it the most common congenital sensory problem in the country. Technological advances, like Sophie’s cochlear implants, now give many children the ability to hear and communicate with spoken English from the time they are babies.

Sitting next to her on the couch in their living room, Sophie’s mom Samantha Zawislak says getting her daughter a cochlear implant, which requires surgery, was a difficult decision.

Read more  . . . . Sign?

Hearing with Cochlear Implants

March 17, 2016 in Technology

 

“Children with cochlear implants are more likely to be educated orally and without access to sign language. Some deaf activists have labeled the widespread implantation of children, as cultural genocide.  Others call the criticism alarming and inaccurate.”

WTTV • CBS INDIANAPOLIS
BY DEBBY KNOX
MARCH 17, 2016

March 16, 2016)- Close to 325,000 people around the world have had cochlear implants surgically implanted.  In the US about 58,000 adults and 38,000 children have been recipients. In Indiana, cochlear implants have been available to profoundly deaf adults since the 1980’s

Cochlear implants are surgically implanted electronic devices which bypass the normal hearing process. A microphone is used and some electronics are placed outside the skin behind the ear.  Together the device transmits a signal to an array of electrodes in the cochlea, which stimulates the cochlear nerve.

Read more  . . . Cochlear Implants

New research finds noise harder on children than adults

March 3, 2016 in Community News

 

From the cacophony of day care to the buzz of TV and electronic toys, noise is more distracting to a child’s brain than an adult’s, and new research shows it can hinder how youngsters learn.

In fact, one of the worst offenders when a tot’s trying to listen is other voices babbling in the background, researchers said Saturday at a meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

“What a child hears in a noisy environment is not what an adult hears,” said Dr. Lori Leibold of Boys Town National Research Hospital in Omaha, Nebraska.

Read more  . . . NOISE

Hearing Loss in Children

January 7, 2016 in Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

flagstaffbusinessnews.com
by
 Flagstaff Business News
January 6, 2016

The incidence of hearing loss in children is higher than you might expect. Studies have shown that newborn hearing screenings identify from one to four out of 1,000 babies tested, depending on the research cited. Most hospitals offer newborn hearing screening and many audiologists offer the test in their office for the babies missed at birth. The babies may have hearing loss because of genetic causes, birth trauma, middle ear fluid, debris in the ear canals or even the side effect of medications given to the newborn. The reported incidence of hearing loss varies from hospital to hospital.

Read more  . . . children +hearing loss

UI Study Highlights Importance of Hearing Aids in Kids with Hearing Loss

November 3, 2015 in Research, Technology

 

 

 SARAH BODEN

The greater degree a child’s hearing loss, the harder it is for that child to keep up with normal-hearing peers. But a new study by the University of Iowa, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill and Boys Town National Research Hospital in Omaha, shows hearing aids can make a big difference.

The study, published in the journal Ear and Hearing, looked at 317 kids with hearing loss. It found that hearing aids are important for the language, scholastic and social development of kids with moderate-to-severe hearing loss.

“We have a lot of information on children who are deaf. But we really don’t’ know a whole lot about children who are hard of hearing.” says researcher Beth Walker.

Read More  . . . Hearing Aids

It’s a Noisy Planet. Protect Their Hearing.

August 12, 2015 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is 100 percent preventable. Yet approximately 26 million Americans between the ages of 20 and 69 have high-frequency hearing loss from overexposure to loud noises at work or during leisure activities. More than 30 million Americans are exposed to dangerous levels of noise on a regular basis1. Children also are frequently exposed to noise levels that could permanently damage their hearing. Noise levels generated by activities as common as doing yard work, playing a band instrument, and attending sports events can result in NIHL. Research suggests that NIHL experienced at an early age may accelerate age-related hearing loss later in life.

NIDCD

In October 2008, the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), launched It’s a Noisy Planet. Protect Their Hearing. The Noisy Planet campaign is designed to increase awareness among parents of children ages 8 to 12 (“tweens”) about the causes and prevention of NIHL. With this information, parents and other caring adults can encourage children to adopt healthy habits that will help them protect their hearing for life.

 

 

 

NIDCD

NIDCD is focusing its campaign on the parents of tweens because children at this age are becoming more independent and developing their own attitudes and habits related to their health. They also are beginning to develop their own listening, leisure, and work habits—or soon will do so. Consequently, the tween years present an open window of opportunity to educate children about their hearing and how to protect it.

Parents still have a great deal of influence over their tween’s behavior, and the Noisy Planet campaign provides them with resources that they can use to educate their children about the causes and prevention of NIHL. The campaign Web site at noisyplanet.nidcd.nih.gov provides parents with facts about NIHL, tips on how to encourage their tween to adopt healthy hearing habits, and other steps they can take to protect their tween’s hearing. The site also offers information specifically for tweens, such as interactive games about noise and hearing.

Signs & Sounds – Summer Children Sign Language Groups

June 25, 2015 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

Sessions available!

  • Age Groups: 7-10 & 11-14
  • Weekly 45-minute
    • theme based lessons
    • on Wednesdays
  • Hands on activities & group practice
  • Where: Northern Virginia Resource Center (NVRC) Pender Drive, Fairfax, VA
  • Registration, instructor bio, and information available www.signsandsoundsllc.com
  • No binding contract commitment
  • Cost $25.00 per session

DOWNLOAD – Signs and Sounds LLC Summer 2015 Childrens ASL Groups Flyer

Flyer_signs_sounds

 

 

 

Update: Many Children’s Television Programs Now Accessible

March 25, 2015 in Community News

 

 

Disability.gov Update: Many Children’s Television Programs Now Accessible for Students with Visual or Hearing Disabilities

Many Children’s Television Programs Now Accessible for Students with Visual or Hearing Disabilities

The U.S. Department of Education has made dozens of children’s television programs available online for students who are blind, visually impaired, deaf or hard of hearing. The shows include closed captioning and video descriptions and can be viewed for free through the Department’s Accessible Television Portal project. Available shows include “Magic School Bus” and “Bill Nye the Science Guy.” This project is part of the Described and Captioned Media Program.

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Sinbad: The Untold Tale – ASL interpreted performance at Imagination Stage!

March 19, 2015 in Community Events, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

April 26, 2015
By Charles Way; Directed by Janet Stanford
ASL  Interpreter: Gerard Williams

Date and time of interpreted/captioned/described event in this format:

Sunday April 26, 2015 at 4:00 PM

Assisted Listening Devices available upon request.

Imagination Stage (4908 Auburn Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20814) Lerner Family Theatre

To Purchase Tickets: Call the box office at  301-280 1660 or visit
http://tickets.imaginationstage.org/public/hall.asp

Sinbad the Sailor has retired from his notorious adventures. He tries to keep his feisty daughter Ittifaq safe from the sorceress Jan Shah. But when a mysterious cloud descends upon Baghdad putting all of the adults to sleep, proud Ittifaq must enlist the help of Sinbad the Porter, a street orphan whom she despises. A quest full of humor, genies, sword fights, diamonds, magic boats, and flying carpets ensues! The two young explorers cross the chasm of their differences to become fast friends and fellow adventurers for life.
Best for Ages 5-12.

 

Video-on-Demand Children’s TV Programming Now Accessible

March 17, 2015 in Disability Law, Technology

 

 

Video-on-Demand Children’s TV Programming Now Accessible for Thousands of Students with Visual or Hearing Disabilities

03/16/2015 10:17 AM EDT
The U.S. Department of Education today announced the availability of free, video-on-demand children’s television programming for thousands of students who are blind, visually impaired, deaf or hard of hearing.

Deaf or Death? In Drug Trial, Parents Weigh Life vs. Hearing Loss

March 10, 2015 in Hearing Loss & Deafness, Research

 

 

An experimental treatment could let children with a rare genetic disease live longer, but it may make them deaf

BETHESDA, Md.—While waiting for an infusion of a drug that might save his life, 15-year-old Andrew Marella gripped the controls of an NFL videogame, the hand-held version of a sport he played when he could still run without fear.

Andrew is in a clinical drug trial of cyclodextrin, a sugar-based substance that scientists hope will stop or slow the progress of a rare genetic disease that kills most patients by the time they are old enough to vote.

There is a good chance cyclodextrin will extend Andrew’s life. But his parents worry this will be the dose that leaves him deaf.

Families in the drug trial must decide whether to permit the higher doses of cyclodextrin that research shows might arrest the disease. Hearing loss is one side effect. “Deaf or death, what are our options?” said Andrea Marella, Andrew’s mother. “We have to keep moving forward.”

Read more  . . . Deaf or Death?