book - Archive

Detroit Deaf Heritage Book – by Kathleen Brockway

July 21, 2016 in Community News

detroitDeafHeritage

Discover the History of Detroit’s Deaf Heritage
Deaf author releases second book feattuing stunning, vintage images

Telling a story in pictures is Detroit’s Deaf Heritage, the newest addition to Arcadia Publishing’s popular Images of America series. The book by author Kathleen Brockway, who was recently inducted into the Susan M. Daniels Disability Mentoring Hall of Fame, is set to release on June 20, 2016. The book boasts 200 vintage images, many of which have never been published, and chronicles the deaf community in the Michigan city.

Download Press Release Detroit Deaf Heritage

Learn more  . . . . Detroit’s Deaf Heritage

KathleenBrockway

Children’s book highlights deaf baseball hero; benefits Deaf Action Center

March 23, 2016 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

The Times
Judy Christie
March 23, 2016

book_basballI’m always on the lookout for great children’s books to give my grandchildren and great-nieces and –nephews.

So I enjoyed visiting with author Nancy Churnin about her new book, “The William Hoy Story,” an inspiring and educational tale about an influential Major League Baseball player who was deaf. I immediately bought a copy for my 4-year-old great-nephew.

Last weekend she read from the book in Shreveport, and an interpreter from the Betty and Leonard Phillips Deaf Action Center of Louisiana signed her words.

Proceeds from all book purchases at Barnes & Noble Saturday benefited the Deaf Action Center. The benefit continues through today (March 24) with online purchases at bn.com, if you put in the book fair number, 11833704. For more information on the center, including sign-language classes, see http://deafactioncenter.org.

Read more   . . . “The William Hoy Story,”

 

 

 

Montgomery County PUBLIC LIBRARIES – Book Discussion in ASL

April 8, 2015 in Community News

 

The Book Discussion in American Sign Language will meet on
Saturday, April 25th at 10 a.m. to discuss

“Plain Truth” by Jodi Picoult

Germantown Library Lower level meeting room
19840 Century Blvd
Germantown, MD 20874
240-777-0110

http://www.montgomerycountymd.gov/library 

DOWNLOAD – Book_Discussion_in_ASL_Flyer

VSDB History Book, History of the Education of the Deaf in Virginia

October 23, 2014 in Community News

 

 

Order Your VSDB History Book

Only 250 copies will be printed and books will be sold for $60 each. There will be 219 pages in the first section (Bass’ Book) and 249 pages in the second part (for a total of 468 pages) with 313 photographs liberally interspersed throughout the book, 144 in the first part and 169 in the second part. Most of the book will be printed in color with some black/white photos on 8.5” x 11” pages, with hard covers (see the photo at the right).

There is a $7.00 additional charge for shipping.

Please contact Race Drake, rfdrake63@gmail.com or VP: 540-416-0017 if you have any questions about this book.

DOWNLOAD – VSDB History Book order form

Washington Post Reviews – ‘EL DEAFO’ by deaf Va. artist CECE BELL

September 24, 2014 in Community News

 

 

Washington Post
Comic Riffs
By Michael Cavna September 23

‘EL DEAFO’: With her first (and so funny) graphic novel,
deaf Va. artist CECE BELL hopes her tale will help others

IT IS A STORY Cece Bell knew she wanted to tell, and believed it was something she should share. But it took decades of discovery and experience, and then artistic growth and parenthood, to get to a place where she was ready to put it to paper.

At age 4, Bell suffered a brief bout with meningitis that left her “severely to profoundly deaf.” Soon she was wearing hearing aids, and a large Phonic Ear across her chest. As her life, too, began to change profoundly, she created an alter-ego – El Deafo! – who, amid a child’s sense of vulnerability and uncertainty, was determined to feel empowered by her being “different.”

Now, at age 43, Bell has introduced her superheroic self to the world in her emotionally truthful graphic-novel debut — titled, naturally, “El Deafo”(Amulet). As memoir, it is a work that demanded its own journey.

“I think the story was easier to tell, since I knew the material inside and out, and I’ve pretty much spent my whole life trying to make sense of some of the things that happened to me,” Bell tells The Post’s Comic Riffs (ahead of her appearance Wednesday morning at Washington’s Politics & Prose bookstore, and tomorrow afternoon at One More Page Books in Arlington, Va.) . “But the [five-year] execution of the book was probably the hardest project I’ve ever taken on in my life.

“I’ve said it so many times my throat hurts: I don’t see how the graphic novelists in this world make more than one of these things in one lifetime!”

Bell was born in Richmond, and “El Deafo” recounts her childhood growing up near Roanoke. Her Virginia roots run through her work in many ways, including the very illustration itself. She created the inviting art of “El Deafo” with Eisner-winning colorist David Lasky, whom she and her husband met while attending the College of William & Mary.

Washington Post Article