Blind - Archive

WOW WALK – “Walk Our Way” Family Fun Day!! Sat. Oct. 24th

September 17, 2015 in Community News

 

dbvi

 

“Walk Our Way” Family Fun Day!!
Saturday, October 24th, 2015 from
11:00 am -2:00 pm

Activities begin at 11:00 am – Walk will begin at 1:30 pm

Westfield High School – Track /Field & Gym 4700 Stonecroft Blvd. Chantilly, VA 20151

Come out and join us in raising awareness of blindness and low vision by participating in our WOW event! Enjoy games, explore technology displays, visit exhibition booths, walk 1 lap with visual simulators, receive FREE vision and hearing screenings by the Lions Club and much more……

Participation is FREE! All ages are welcome!

For more information call us: DBVI-Fairfax
(703) 359-1100

 

DOWNLOAD – FRO WOW Flyer 2015

Band member excels with rare syndrome causing hearing loss

April 7, 2015 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

The Herald

Rachel Pavone is blind, hearing-impaired and diabetic — but that doesn’t change her resolve to be successful in life and play in her high school band.

“One of the things people think about blind people or anyone with a disability is we’re potatoes and we don’t do anything,” the Grand Blanc High School senior told The Flint Journal (http://bit.ly/1InhKtv ). “So, the thing that I was taught at a very young age — because my mom does this and so does my dad — is that you have to work really hard to be very successful.”

She may be one of about 500 people with Alström syndrome, a rare genetic condition that can cause a series of different symptoms, including progressive vision and hearing loss.

Nevertheless, beyond learning to play the alto saxophone, Pavone has played the timpani, drum pad and synthesizer during concerts and marching band events throughout high school.

Some Deaf, Blind Students Find Success at Gooding School

January 27, 2015 in Community News

 

 

Times-News – Southern Idaho Local News
By  JULIE WOOTTON
January 26, 2015

GOODING • Emma McLaughlin-Orton’s life has changed since she came to the Idaho School for the Deaf and the Blind.

“I can’t explain it. It’s way too cool.” The Couer d’Alene 12-year-old had struggled in school because of her hearing difficulties. But in her first year at ISDB, she’s discovered she enjoys math. “I was really surprised. I used to hate math.” A national debate rages over whether children who are blind/visually impaired or deaf/hard of hearing should stay in local schools or go to special campuses.

Some believe children gain more independence in a public school where they learn to fend for themselves. Others say special schools are optimal. “Specialized schools have been under fire in a number of ways,” said Brian Darcy, administrator of the state’s Gooding-based Idaho Educational Services for the Deaf and the Blind.

The question is: What’s least restrictive? ISDB is best for some, Darcy said.

Idaho’s services for deaf and blind students came under fire from 2006 through 2009. When employees and alumni celebrated the ISDB’s 100th year in 2006, they feared it would close. “This may be the last time that the alumni will have to visit the school,” alumna Janette Lancaster told the Times-News then. “The legislators have the opinion that it is better for the children to be in public schools, but I don’t think they realize what we do for the students here.” Lawmakers proposed closing Gooding’s campus, enrolling blind students in public schools and sending deaf students to five sites around Idaho.

It didn’t happen. Idaho Educational Services for the Deaf and the Blind reorganized in 2009 as a state agency instead of being under the state Board of Education.

Read More . . .

New FCC Rule on Accessible Navigation Devices

November 4, 2013 in Advocacy & Access, Technology

FCC Issues Video Programming Rule Requiring Navigation Devices be Accessible to Blind, Deaf

New rule covers devices used for over-the-top streaming to televisions, including game consoles and set-top boxes, as well as tablets and other mobile devices

By J.J. Smith, Streamingmedia.com 11/1/2013

The U.S. government has issued a rule requiring video equipment manufacturers—including the makers of devices used for streaming—and the producers of connected software ensure that the video-programming navigation devices in those products are “more easily” accessed by individuals who are blind or visually impaired, or who are deaf or hard of hearing.

On Oct. 31, the Federal Communications Commission issued a “report and order and further notice of proposed rulemaking” on “Accessibility of User Interfaces and Video Programming Guides and Menus” and “Access Emergency Information and Apparatus Requirements for Emergency Information and Video Description.”

The regulations listed in the document cover video “navigation devices” such as “converter boxes, interactive communications equipment, and other equipment used by consumers to access multi-channel video programming and other services offered over multi-channel video programming systems,” according to the document.

The FCC says such navigation devices includes devices that have a built-in capability to use a conditional access mechanism in order to access video programming and other services using a multi-channel video programming device (MVPD), the document says. Those devices include televisions, computers, and mobile devices such as tablets and smartphones that do not have pre-installed MVPD applications and that have removable media players.

Among those impacted by the regulation include the makers of video equipment containing navigation devices that are sold to the general public, and software manufacturers who produce programs that are installed into those navigation devices and that display on-screen text menus and guides, the document says.

The producers of those items have a three-year deadline to comply, but a specific deadline date is not included in the document. However, while the entities governed by the rule have three years to comply, they must also provide accessible navigation devices to requesting blind or visually impaired individuals “within a reasonable time,” the document says. The FCC defines a reasonable time as the period it takes such an entity to generally provide navigation devices to other consumers, according to the report and order.

For the rest of the story: http://bit.ly/HwKuXy

 


DIstributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. You do not need permission to share this information, but please be sure to credit NVRC.  This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

FCC Adopts Rules on Accessible Televised Emergency Information for Blind, Vision Impaired Individuals

April 13, 2013 in Advocacy & Access, Community News, Technology

FCC Adopts Rules on Emergency Information and Video Equipment Requirements for Emergency Information and Video Description

From the Federal Communications Commission, 4/12/2013

The FCC adopted rules to make televised emergency information more accessible to individuals who are blind or visually impaired.  The new rules require emergency information that appears visually during a non-news program (such as when information about the emergency appears visually on the bottom of the screen during a regularly scheduled program) to be provided audibly on a secondary audio stream.  The rules will take effect two years after publication in the Federal Register.  However, The Weather Channel has an additional 6 months to comply, and The Weather Channel on DIRECTV has an additional 1 year to comply.

New Requirements for Equipment.  The FCC also adopted rules to ensure that certain equipment used to receive, play back, or record television programs is able to make secondary audio streams available.  Secondary audio streams will convey emergency information, as well as the video description that makes programs accessible to individuals who are blind or visually impaired.  These rules also go into effect two years after they are published in the Federal Register.

Further Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (FNPRM).   In addition to adopting the new rules, the FCC is asking the public to comment on three issues:

(1)  whether the FCC should require companies covered by the new rules to provide contact information and customer support services to help consumers who are blind or visually impaired navigate between the main and secondary audio streams;

(2)   whether new services that deliver certain types of television programming over tablets, laptops, personal computers, smartphones, or similar devices should be covered by the FCC’s requirements for video description and accessible emergency information; and

(3)   whether the FCC should require accessibility content on the secondary audio stream to be tagged in a manner that enables equipment to detect this content when it is present – this will make it easier for consumers who are blind or visually impaired to find the secondary audio stream.

FNPRM Comment Date:  (60 days after date of publication in the Federal Register)

FNPRM Reply Comment Date:  (90 days after date of publication in the Federal Register)

Report and Order and Further Notice of Proposed Rule making:
http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/FCC-13-45A1.docx
http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/FCC-13-45A1.pdf

Statement issued by Commissioner Clyburn:
http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/FCC-13-45A2.docx
http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/FCC-13-45A2.pdf

Statement issued by Commissioner Rosenworcel:
http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/FCC-13-45A3.docx
http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/FCC-13-45A3.pdf

Statement issued by Commissioner Pai:
http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/FCC-13-45A4.docx
http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/FCC-13-45A4.pdf

For more information, contact Diana Sokolow, Diana.Sokolow@fcc.gov, or Maria Mullarkey, Maria.Mullarkey@fcc.gov, of the Media Bureau, Policy Division, (202) 418-2120.


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

Deaf Blind Camp of Maryland – Benefit Dinner & Auction

April 10, 2013 in Community Events, Hearing Loss & Deafness

deafBlindCamp_MD

Benefit Dinner and Auction

Saturday, April 27, 2013

5:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.

Arbutus United Methodist Church

1201 Maple Avenue, Halethorpe, MD 21227

Bid on quality gifts, theme baskets, gift cards,

Orioles and Ravens memorabilia

Have fun and enjoy a delicious meal (including vegetarian options).

____________________________________________________________

Detach and return this with your payment by April 20.

Make checks payable to Deaf Interfaith.

Please mail to Toby Witte-Dix, 911 Regina Drive, Baltimore, MD  21227

Yes, please reserve _____# of tickets @ $15.00 each             _________

No, I can not come, please accept my enclosed donation      _________

_____________________________  ______________________________

Print name                                                                                    email address

For more information, contact Sandi at PastorSandi.Johnson@gmail.com.

If you need an SSP or wish to volunteer, contact Lisa at Gordoner1@aol.com.

Deaf Interfaith – Mrs.Toby Witte-Dix – 410.608.0607 – 911 Regina Drive – Baltimore, MD 21227

 

 

Pro-Tactile Workshop by MWADB on Feb 2

January 24, 2013 in Community Events, Education & Outreach, Interpreting & Transliterating

        Pro-Tactile Workshop

      Sponsored by

    Metro Washington Association of the DeafBlind

Saturday, 2 February 2013

3:30 P.M. – 5:00 P.M.

Multipurpose Room @ Student Academic Center (SAC)

Gallaudet University
800 Florida Avenue NE, Washington, D.C. 20002

Cost: $10.00 Per Person

Presented By: Steven Collins & Jamie Pope

RID ACET

CEUs will be provided

Pro-tactile is a great way to practice communicating by touch and tactile ASL in a relaxing environment!

 Come join the fun!

R.S.V.P. by Thursday, 31 January 2013 to rsvp@mwadb.org

With your request for Workshop, SSP or ride


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

Social by Metro Washington Assn of DeafBlind on Feb 3

January 23, 2013 in Community Events

MWADB Social Event

 Saturday, 2 February 2013

Multipurpose Room @ Student Academic Center (SAC)

Gallaudet University
800 Florida Avenue NE, Washington, D.C. 20002

5:00 P.M. – 9:00 P.M.

Spaghetti with tomato sauce (plain, meat, or vegan)

and drinks will be provided

Please bring a dessert to share!

Cost: $5.00 for members and $10.00 for non-members

(SSPs must RSVP for free admission)

R.S.V.P. by Thursday, 31 January 2013 to rsvp@mwadb.org

with your request for Event, SSP or Ride


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

NFB Comments on Belgian Euthanasia of Deaf Brothers Losing Eyesight

January 11, 2013 in Advocacy & Access, Community News, Disability Law

National Federation of the Blind Comments on Belgian Euthanasia of Deaf Men Losing Sight

From PR Newswire, 1/15/201

The National Federation of the Blind, the largest organization of blind people in the United States with over 50,000 members, including many deaf-blind individuals, commented today on the state-sanctioned death by lethal injection of deaf twins in Belgium. Upon learning that they were also going blind, the deaf twins sought and were granted euthanasia.

Dr. Marc Maurer, President of the National Federation of the Blind, said: “This disturbing news from Belgium is a stark example of the common, and in this case tragic, misunderstanding of disability and its consequences. Adjustment to any disability is difficult, and deaf-blind people face their own particular challenges, but from at least the time of Helen Keller it has been known that these challenges can be met, and the technology and services available today have vastly improved prospects for the deaf-blind and others with disabilities. That these men wanted to die is tragic; that the state sanctioned and aided their suicide is frightening.”

The National Federation of the Blind needs your support to ensure that blind children get an equal education, to connect blind veterans with the training and services they need, and to help seniors who are losing vision continue to live independent and fulfilling lives.

National Federation of the Blind (NFB) is the oldest, largest, and most influential nationwide membership organization of blind people in the United States. Founded in 1940, the NFB advocates for the civil rights and equality of blind Americans, and develops innovative education, technology, and training programs to provide the blind and those who are losing vision with the tools they need to become independent and successful. For more information:www.nfb.org.


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.