aid - Archive

Student makes discovery when it comes to extending hearing aid battery life

May 19, 2015 in Community News, Technology

 

Published: 

ROCHESTER, Minn. – An 8th grade student may have made a discovery that could save people who wear hearing aids significant money.

Ethan Manuell is an audiology patient at Olmsted County Medical Center and wears a hearing aid in his left ear. He began a study, with the help of his audiologist, Mary Meier Au. D, looking into the effect wait time has on hearing aid batteries, which is the time between activating the battery and placing the battery in the hearing aid.

To activate a hearing aid battery, users need to remove a sticker on the battery which allows oxygen to mix with zinc-oxide inside the battery. Manuell did tests to see if waiting a little longer before putting the battery into the device would make a difference. What he found was if users wait 5 minutes after pulling off the sticker, the battery will last 2-3 days longer, which is significant considering batteries usually last anywhere from 2-7 days depending on the model.

“The more energized zinc you have, the longer it lasts. So this discovery I made, if you wait five minutes, it improves the battery life by 80%,” explains Manuell.

Ethan has won several awards and received recognition for his “5 minute rule” discovery, including earning a US Naval Science Award.

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News on Made for iPhone Hearing Aids

November 26, 2013 in Hearing Loss & Deafness, Technology

Made For iPhone’ Hearing Aids Coming Early 2014

By Adnan Farooqu, ubergizmo.com (http://bit.ly/IgtmW3)11/25/2013aid_iphone

Most people might be unaware of the fact that Denmark supplies half of the world’s hearing aids. A lot of companies based in the country have consistently been working to leverage modern technology to help those who are hard of hearing or those who can’t hear at all. GN ReSound, a company based in Copenhagen, Denmark, has worked closely with Apple on its LiNX hearing aids which are the world’s first “Made for iPhone” hearing aids. The technology is actually quite impressive, these are the first hearing aids of any kind that can connect directly to a smartphone without needing a “streamer” that acts as a transmitter between a hearing aid and a Bluetooth equipped mobile phone.

LiNX hearing aids can be used to stream music and as a two-way headset for phone calls, its settings can be adjusted through a companion app for iOS. They communicate with the device through the 2.4 gigahertz band using Bluetooth 4.0 LE. LiNX is going to ship early next year, it will be priced a tad over $3,000 per hearing aid. Apple has also been working with other companies on similar products, William Demant in Denmark and Starkey Technologies in Minnesota have been working with Apple to create similar “Made for iPhone” products.


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. You do not need permission to share this information, but please be sure to credit NVRC.  This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

A Different Kind of Hearing Aid for Seniors

November 12, 2013 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness

A Different Kind of Hearing Aid

By PAULA SPAN, The New York Times, 11/12/2013

Jim Cooke blames his hearing loss on the constant roar of C-119 aircraft engines he experienced in the Air Force. He didn’t wear protective gear because, like most 20-year-olds, “you think you’re indestructible,” he said. By the time he was 45, he needed hearing aids for both ears.

Still, he had a long career as a telephone company executive while he and his wife, Jean, raised two children in Broadview Heights, Ohio. Only after retirement, he told me in an interview, did he start having trouble communicating.

Mr. Cooke had to relinquish a couple of part-time jobs he enjoyed because “I felt insecure about dealing with people on the phone,” he said. He withdrew from a church organization he led because he couldn’t grasp what members were saying at meetings.

“He didn’t want to be in social situations,” Mrs. Cooke said. “It gave him a feeling of inadequacy, and anger at times.”

Two years ago, when their grandchildren began saying that Granddad needed to replace his hearing aid batteries — although the batteries were fine — the Cookes went to the Cleveland Clinic, where an audiologist there, Dr. Sarah Sydlowski, told Jim that at 76, he might consider a cochlear implant.

Perhaps the heart-tugging YouTube videos of deaf toddlers suddenly hearing sounds have led us to think of cochlear implants as primarily for children. Or perhaps, said Dr. Frank R. Lin, a Johns Hopkins University epidemiologist, we consider late-life hearing loss normal (which it is), “an unfortunate but inconsequential aspect of aging,” and don’t explore treatment beyond hearing aids.

In any case, the idea of older adults having a complex electronic device surgically implanted has been slow to catch on, even though by far the greatest number of people with severe hearing loss are seniors.

Often, when patients start to withdraw from conversation and activities, “families chalk it up to aging or the beginning of cognitive decline, when in fact their hearing loss has progressed to the point where they can’t engage,” Dr. Sydlowski said.

Beyond the social and emotional toll — isolation, withdrawal, depression — “the kind of hearing loss we’ll all develop increases our risk for cognitive decline, dementia and even physical decline,” Dr. Lin said. A brain constantly working to try to interpret degraded sound, he explained, has less ability to handle other kinds of thinking and memory-building.

Dr. Lin estimated that 150,000 Americans over age 70 could benefit from an implant.

See the rest of the story at http://nyti.ms/HPGS33

 

 


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. You do not need permission to share this information, but please be sure to credit NVRC.  This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

HLAA Exhibitor: Micropower Battery Company

June 30, 2011 in Education & Outreach

 By Marla Dougherty  6/27/11

Another new exhibitor to the HLAA Convention this year was the Micropower Battery Company. Each convention bag had a gift card for a trial pack of batteries, so visiting their table was first on my list! 

Micropower Battery Company is a wholesale, direct to customer distributer and retailer that represents 9 battery manufacturers. Online sales at Microbattery.com can save up to 1/3-1/2 off store purchased batteries. There is a lower price for specialized batteries when you purchase large quantities. Other small batteries such as watch and camera batteries are sold by Micropower too. http://www.microbattery.com/

HLAA Exhibitor: Starkey Laboratories

June 30, 2011 in Education & Outreach

By Marla Dougherty  6/23/11

I stopped by the Starkey booth and spoke with Jason Horowitz to see what was new with this 44 year old company. Jason was eager to tell me about the Wi series and new Sound Lens, the latest in invisible hearing aids.

Wi Series: This Receiver-In-Canal hearing aid is designed to give improved sound clarity even in noisy situations. What I found interesting about the product is that it can wirelessly stream stereo, TV and computer directly to the hearing aid without any relay device worn around the neck. It does so by using a new wireless integrated circuit platform, which Jason explained was better than BlueTooth technology and about three times faster.
 
Sound Lens: This is Starkey’s new hearing aid that sits inside the second bend of the ear canal. Depending on the user’s ear anatomy, it won’t be visible. Unlike the Lyric, the digital Sound Lens can be removed daily and allows the user to change the battery. Memory and volume adjustments can be made remotely using any touch tone phone.