ada - Archive

Department of Justice: If Disabled People Can’t Use Berkeley’s Free Online Courses, No One Can

September 22, 2016 in Advocacy & Access, Disability Law

 

 

The university will have to remove free online content that doesn’t meet the standards of the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Harrison Bergeron should enroll at the University of California-Berkeley. The federal Department of Justice recently informed the university that the online content it makes available to the public free of charge runs afoul of the Americans with Disabilities Act—blind and deaf people wouldn’t be able to access it, according to the government.

In response, Berkeley is considering simply removing the online resources, since that’s much cheaper than becoming ADA compliant.

You might say, well, Berkeley is a public university, and has a responsibility to make its resources available to all students, regardless of their disability status. That’s true. But here’s the thing: no Berkeley student has complained. The online courses have proven to be perfectly accessible to the entire student body thus far.

Read more . . . DOJ – ADA

Speaker – Steven Gordon • USDOJ – ADA and Healthcare for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Patients – March 19th

March 11, 2016 in Community Events, Community News, Disability Law

SpeakerBanner16

ADA and Healthcare for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Patients

Was held Saturday, March 19,2016

This was a well attended informational event, handouts and slides can be downloaded at bottom of page

Reuben I. Altizer Meeting Room
Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons
3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130 Fairfax, VA 22030

Presenter:
Steven Gordon, Assistant United States Attorney – USDOJ

Assistant United States Attorney Steven Gordon will discuss a health care provider’s obligation to provide effective communication to patients (and companions) who are deaf or hard of hearing . Ensuring equal access in health care settings is necessary to comply with Federal law.

Mr. Gordon has been with the Department of Justice since 1995 and many of his recent cases come under the Department of Justice’s Barrier-Free Health Care Initiative targeting enforcement efforts on a critical area for individuals with disabilities – access to medical services and facilities.

Mr. Gordon invites your questions and will discuss recent enforcement actions and settlements including those in Northern Virginia.

All programs are captioned and ASL interpreted
Programs are free and open to the public
Donations welcome

Handouts for this presentation:

 

Your Right to a Qualified Sign Language Interpreter During the Receipt of Medical Services

January 19, 2016 in Advocacy & Access, Community News

 

Effective Communication

Approximately 600,000 Virginians are deaf or hard of hearing and have difficulty communicating with hearing persons. When the need arises for medical services—whether it be a trip to the doctor’s office or an emergency admission to the hospital—the anxiety, fear, humiliation, and distress ordinarily accompanying these situations is even more severe for someone who is deaf or hard of hearing.

Sometimes, medical service providers fail or refuse to provide qualified sign language interpreters to their patients who are deaf or hard of hearing and need an interpreter to communicate. When this happens, the medical service providers illegally discriminate against these patients. Congress sought to end this type of discrimination by passing the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). In fact, Congress specifically recognized health care as one of the critical areas in which individuals with disabilities are routinely the victims of discrimination.

Read more  . . .  DOWNLOAD PDF –  Right-to-a-Qualified-Sign-Language-Interpreter-09-2014 (1)

Speaker Series 2016 – ADA and Healthcare for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Patients

January 5, 2016 in Community News

NVRC speaker Series 2016

Saturday, March 19 10am – noon

Reuben I. Altizer Meeting Room
Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons
3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130 Fairfax, VA 22030

To RSVP for this event:
RSVP for this event Click Here 

Presenter:
Steven Gordon, Assistant United States Attorney – USDOJ

Assistant United States Attorney Steven Gordon will discuss a health care provider’s obligation to provide effective communication to patients (and companions) who are deaf or hard of hearing . Ensuring equal access in health care settings is necessary to comply with Federal law.

Mr. Gordon has been with the Department of Justice since 1995 and many of his recent cases come under the Department of Justice’s Barrier-Free Health Care Initiative targeting enforcement efforts on a critical area for individuals with disabilities – access to medical services and facilities.

Mr. Gordon invites your questions and will discuss recent enforcement actions and settlements including those in Northern Virginia.

All programs are captioned and ASL interpreted
Programs are free and open to the public
Donations welcome

DOWNLOAD – ADA and Healthcare flyer

Philadelphia – Deaf employee sues UPS

December 10, 2015 in Community News

 

 

Daily News  – Philly.com
JULIE SHAW
December 10, 2015

AS A deaf employee, Michael MacDonald can do his work as a package handler at the United Parcel Service facility at Philadelphia International Airport without assistance.

But when it comes to employee meetings and to understanding certain things – such as safety and emergency procedures, company policies and procedures, and some other workplace communications – he needs an American Sign Language interpreter.

Federal law – the Americans with Disabilities Act – “requires employers to provide reasonable accommodations to otherwise qualified individuals with disabilities so that they can enjoy equal employment opportunities and participate fully in the workplace,” said Julie Foster, an attorney at the Public Interest Law Center of Philadelphia, which filed a lawsuit on MacDonald’s behalf.
Read more  . . . UPS

Deaf parents’ claim over sign language failure reinstated

September 1, 2015 in Advocacy & Access, Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

 

Business Insurance
By Judy Greenwald
Aug. 31, 2015

An appeals court has reinstated discrimination claims filed against a hospital by the deaf parents of a child with a brain tumor, who claimed the hospital failed to provide deaf interpreters for them for most of the time they needed it.

The four-month old daughter of Rolando and Miriam Perez was diagnosed with a brain tumor that required monthly treatment in January 2011, according to Friday’s ruling by the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans in Rolando Perez; Miriam Perez v. Doctors Hospital at Renaissance Ltd.

Ms. Perez is completely deaf and communicates exclusively in American Sign Language, while Mr. Perez is completely deaf in his right ear and cannot hear well in his left, and ASL is his primary language, according to the ruling.

The Perezes allege that while Doctors Hospital in Edinburg, Texas, provided them with interpreters for a time period of 2013 through early 2014, during the periods 2011 through part of 2012, and again beginning in April 2014, they had problems, including interpreters failing to arrive.

The couple filed suit against the hospital in March 2013, charging it with violations of Title III of the Americans with Disabilities Act, which governs public accommodation of the disabled, and state laws

The hospital’s executive vice president for nursing testified in a deposition that the hospital’s ADA compliance policy  . . .

Read More . . . American Sign Language

Feds cite Henrico Amtrak station for violating deaf man’s rights

September 1, 2015 in Advocacy & Access, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

 

Fredericksburg.com
Associated Press
September 1, 2015

RICHMOND — The Federal Railroad Administration has cited an Amtrak station in Henrico County for violating a deaf man’s rights under the Americans With Disabilities Act.

The agency said the station on Staples Mill Road lacked required public telephone technology for people who are deaf or hard of hearing.

The agency also said the station doesn’t provide a visual information system to update passengers about delays and schedule changes.

The Richmond Times-Dispatch (http://bit.ly/1MZWuyw ) reports that disAbility Law Center of Virginia director Colleen Miller announced the agency’s findings on Monday. The center had filed a complaint on behalf of Gary W. Talley of Petersburg.

Talley says announcements of train delays often are made by loudspeaker.

Amtrak told the federal agency that it’s taking appropriate action to ensure its operations comply with the law.

 

 

She Owes Her Activism To A Brave Mom, The ADA And Chocolate Cake

August 25, 2015 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

National Public Radio
JOSEPH SHAPIRO
JULY 31, 2015

To Haben Girma’s grandmother, back in East Africa, it “seemed like magic.” Her granddaughter, born deaf and blind, is a graduate of Harvard Law School and works as a civil rights attorney.

It’s easy to understand why the grandmother feels that way. Years before, she had tried to find a school in Eritrea for Girma’s older brother, who was also born deaf and blind. She was turned away. There were schools for blind children and schools for deaf children. But no school would teach a child who was deaf-blind (that’s the preferred terminology in the disability community). Girma describes that brother as “brilliant.”

Girma told the story last week at the White House, when she introduced President Obama during a ceremony to mark the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act.

By the time Girma was born in 1988, six years younger than her brother, her mother had made a refugee’s journey from Eritrea to the United States. And in California, a deaf-blind girl like Girma had a legal right to an education.

In public schools in Oakland, she was educated alongside other students, leaving her mainstream classes for an hour a day to learn Braille.

Read more  . . . See Pictures

Watch captioned – Video

 

See pictures from Fairfax Area Disability Services Board (FA-DSB)’s reception for ADA

July 30, 2015 in Community News

 

 

The Fairfax Area Disability Services Board (FA-DSB)’s reception recognizing the 25th Anniversary of the ADA

Held at Fairfax County Government Center, on July 28th

 

3 lessons from developers who have embraced assistive technology

July 26, 2015 in Technology

 

 

 

MASHABLE
July 26, 2105
By Karissa Bell

When the Americans with Disabilities Act was signed into law 25 years ago, few could have imagined just how much would change as a result of the legislation.
Fewer still could have imagined a world where almost anyone has access to pocket-sized computers that would open so many doors to people with disabilities.

Today, we have apps that can help the blind see, give words to those who can’t speak and enable independence for people who would otherwise be forced to rely on others. To celebrate these advancements, Apple debuted a new collection in iTunes Thursday, highlighting apps that take advantage of accessibility features on iOS devices. The selection includes apps that help people with hearing and visual impairments interact with the world around them, those that enable communication for people with autism and apps that encourage learning at all levels.

We talked to some of the developers on the front lines of accessibility about what they’ve learned while creating these powerful apps, here’s what they told us.

1. Design matters — even if your users can’t see your app

Design is a fundamental part of any app. But even the most seasoned software makers find they need to rethink many aspects of design and user experience they would otherwise take for granted. While Apple makes its accessibility tools, like VoiceOver, readily available, developers often find making their app truly accessible requires a much more nuanced approach than what they’re used to.

Read More  . . . assistive technology

Performance Deaf Hip-Hop Artist Sean Forbes & DJ Robbie Wilde – Free

July 16, 2015 in Community Events

 

 

Free Performance & Party with Deaf Hip-Hop Artist Sean Forbes & DJ Robbie Wilde

Free  – open to all

TiLT Challenge and Dance Party

Kennedy Center Atrium
7:30 pm – 10:00 pm
July 20, 2015

Free; Limited seating; Limited capacity. Up to two wristbands per person will be distributed on a first come, first-served basis beginning at 7:00 p.m. in the States Gallery outside the Atrium at the Kennedy Center

Don’t miss this dance party featuring Deaf performers Sean Forbes and DJ Robbie Wilde. Sean is a ground-breaking, one-lf-a-kind talent – he is a rapper and a songwriter with a show that will knock your socks off!    Sean will share the stage with  DJ Robbie Wilde who says he literally feels his music. Come for the music, come to dance!

The show will be signed, captioned and voiced.  Everyone is welcome.

MORE INFORMATION ON:
The Kennedy Center and Smithsonian Institution 20/40 Celebration
DOWNLOAD – VSA2540 Celebration2015_PressRelease

 

 

ADA 25 years Event on Tues July 28 – NEW TIME of 8:30am

July 16, 2015 in Community Events

 

 

The Fairfax Area Disability Services Board (FA-DSB)’s reception recognizing the 25th Anniversary of the ADA has a NEW START TIME of 8:30 a.m. on Tuesday July 28 in Conference Rooms 2/3 of the Fairfax County Government Center.  The attached invitation and information below contains the updated start time.  All are welcome–people with disabilities, friends, family members, direct support professionals, advocates, colleagues, government and nonprofit partners–If you believe in the spirit of the ADA, equal access, and full inclusion of individuals with disabilities into mainstream community life, then the FA-DSB looks forward to commemorating this important milestone with you!

The Fairfax Area Disability Services Board cordially invites you to attend a reception in honor of the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

Tuesday, July 28, 2015, at 8:30 a.m.
Fairfax County Government Center, Conference Rooms 2/3
12000 Government Center Parkway, Fairfax, VA 22035

Immediately following the reception, participants will proceed to the Board Auditorium for recognition by the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors.  Everyone is encouraged to join in the celebration by coming to the front of the auditorium, to show that you support the theme of the 25th anniversary of the ADA, that “Disability Rights are Civil Rights!”

RSVP (appreciated, but not required) or request reasonable accommodations by contacting Alison Kron at: voice: 703-324-5414, TTY: 703-449-1186, or e-mail: alison.kron@fairfaxcounty.gov.

DOWNLOAD – ADA 25 invite_Flyer_7-28-15_830am

 

Celebrate NTID, ADA milestones this summer

June 12, 2015 in Community News, Disability Law

 

 

D&C Democrat Chronicle
by Gerard Buckley
June 5, 2015

In the span of less than two months this summer, we will celebrate the anniversaries of two major milestones that have changed the lives of millions of Americans, including my own.

The first of these anniversaries is June 8 — the 50 th anniversary of the signing of Public Law 89-36 by President Lyndon Baines Johnson. PL 89-36 is also known as the National Technical Institute for the Deaf Act, and for the first time in our nation’s history, it established a technological college for deaf and hard-of-hearing individuals to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, more commonly known now as STEM.

Since its establishment, NTID and its host institution, Rochester Institute of Technology, have graduated more than 7,000 deaf and hard-of-hearing students, and I’m proud to be one of them. I’m prouder still to now lead the college as we continue to help students earn degrees and hit the ground running in scientific, technical and professional careers.

Twenty-five years after PL 89-36 was enacted, I, by then an RIT/NTID alumnus, was fortunate to be invited by Sen. Robert Dole to witness the signing of the Americans with Disabilities Act by President George H.W. Bush on July 26, 1990. The ADA has provided still more opportunities for equal access to Americans of all abilities. As President Bush said in his remarks that day, “With today’s signing … every man, woman and child with a disability can now pass through once-closed doors into a bright new era of equality, independence and freedom.”

Read more  . . . milestones

Texas-Commissioners approve written communication policy for hearing-impaired

May 7, 2015 in Advocacy & Access, Disability Law, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

The Gilmore Mirror
by PHILLIP WILLIAMS
May 2, 2015

Gilmore, Texas –  Upshur County Commissioners Court on Thursday approved a written communication policy for dealing with the hearing-impaired, a move which County Judge Dean Fowler said means the county will no longer “be under the hand of the (United States) Department of Justice, which is a very good thing.”
Fowler told The Mirror someone filed a complaint against the county under the Americans With Disabilities Act in 2009, and the Justice Department investigated in 2010, the year the county made an agreement with the department to resolve it. That led to courthouse renovations performed in recent years, he said.The new communication policy means county employees will be given instructions on how to communicate with the hearing-impaired, such as passing notes back and forth, Fowler said. If needed, an interpreter can be brought in, he said.

An unnamed Tyler source, which would be paid only when it renders service, would provide sign language when needed, Fowler said. He said the county has only dealt with one such hearing-impaired person in 12 years.

The Gilmer Mirror – Commissioners approve written communication policy for hearing impaired

 

 

After Fan Pressure, Netflix Makes ‘Daredevil’ Accessible To The Blind

April 19, 2015 in Advocacy & Access, Disability Law, Technology

 

 

National Public Radio
APRIL 18, 2015

Netflix’s original series now have a superhero among them. Comic fans know Daredevil as a crusader. He’s a Marvel character who, in addition to his superhuman abilities, has a very human disability: blindness.

Needless to say, Daredevil has quite a few fans with visual impairments — and they were looking forward to the show.

But until this week, Netflix had no plans to provide the audio assistance that could have helped those fans follow the show.

The FCC requires broadcasters to provide audio descriptions of many programs so blind people can enjoy TV along with everyone else.

But Netflix isn’t a broadcaster — it’s an Internet-based service. And they didn’t plan to provide that audio.

In other words, the superhero would not have been able to enjoy his own program.

Robert Kingett, a journalist and activist in Chicago, is a fan of Daredevil. He’s blind and also lives with cerebral palsy. And when he learned the show wouldn’t have audio descriptions, Kingett recalls, “I said, ‘Well, that’s just utterly insane.’ ”

Read more  . . . Netflix

Transcript