acoustics - Archive

New Interactive Studio Allows Deaf Children to ‘Hear’

July 29, 2014 in Hearing Loss & Deafness, Research, Technology

 

 

http://www.designntrend.com
by Osvaldo Nunez , Design & Trend Contributor
Article Source

In a spectacular merging of engineering and acoustics, The Cooper Union in New York City has created a unique learning environment for deaf and hearing-impaired children.

By installing an interactive light studio at the American Sign Language and English Lower School in New York City, the studio displayed entertaining images and graphics on an interactive screen. The pre-kindergarten children using the 270-square-foot space get to learn through their interactions with the moving images and light pulses and the displays allow them to actually understand the intricacies of sound, despite the fact that they can’t actually hear.

“We are creating a learning environment in which deaf and hearing-impaired children can explore and appreciate the various qualities of music and sound through the interplay of light and vibration,” said Melody Baglione, a professor at The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art. “We have developed technologies enabling the children to visualize sound.”

Read More  . . .

AG Bell Association Information on Classroom Acoustics

March 29, 2013 in Hearing Loss & Deafness, Technology

Classroom Acoustics Information

From the Alexander Graham Bell Association www.agbell.org

As they age, buildings can only get noisier, not quieter – cracks form and widen, duct anchors come loose and vibrate, fans and belts begin to squeal. Whatever the mix of exterior and interior noise, the best retrofit solutions are the ones that counteract multiple sources at the same time.

Hiring a qualified acoustician who can help find those solutions is highly recommended, and can leverage all the other investments you make in an existing building. Learn more about reducing noise in learning spaces with the Alexander Graham Bell Association’s article, Reducing Noise in Learning Spaces at http://www.listeningandspokenlanguage.org/Document.aspx?id=185


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

Cued Speech

March 29, 2011 in Interpreting & Transliterating

Cued Speech is a mode of communication based on the phonemes and properties of traditionally spoken languages. Cueing allows users who are deaf or hard of hearing or who have language/communication disorders to access the basic, fundamental properties of spoken languages through the use of vision.(taken from the National Cued Speech Association’s website)    

Below is a list of local Cued Speech Transliterators who provide services in the metro DC area:

Ashley Elder
Email: ashrenee85@gmail.com
Phone: (571) 318-3491

Nichelle Wilson
Email: mrs_njwilson@yahoo.com
Phone: (571) 426-3747



National Cued Speech Association Logo

National Cued Speech Association
5619 McLean Drive
Bethesda, MD 20814-1021

Toll Free: 800-459-3529
Local: 301-915-8009
Email: info@cuedspeech.org

 

Marlee Matlin on Celebrity Apprentice

March 17, 2011 in Community Events

Starring in “Children of a Lesser God” at age 21, Marlee Matlin became the youngest recipient of the Best Actress Oscar and one of only four actresses to receive that honor for a film debut. Born and raised in Morton Grove, Illinois, Matlin started acting at the age of seven in the role of Dorothy in “The Wizard of Oz” at a children’s theatre company in Chicago. She was discovered in a Chicago stage production of “Children of a Lesser God.” She was then selected to star in the film version.Matlin made her TV debut in CBS’ “Bridge to Silence.” She went on to star for two seasons in the series “Reasonable Doubts.” She was twice nominated for both a Golden Globe as well as a People’s Choice Award. Matlin was nominated for two Emmys for her guest turns on “Seinfeld” and “Picket Fences.” Matlin also starred in “Against Her Will: The Carrie Buck Story,” a movie for Lifetime Television, for which she was nominated for a CableACE Award for Best Actress in a Movie or Mini-Series. She broke down yet another barrier with the role, playing a character who wasn’t deaf. Matlin returned to CBS’ “Picket Fences” to reprise her Emmy-nominated role. Coincidentally, her character on “Picket Fences” gave birth on the same day she gave birth in real life, a feat repeated exactly 43 years to the day by Lucille Ball on “I Love Lucy” on the same network, CBS.

For seven seasons, Matlin starred as pollster Joey Lucas, on NBC’s Emmy Award winning series “The West Wing.” She received her third Emmy Award nomination for her work on ABC’s “The Practice,” and guest starred on NBC’s “Law and Order: SVU,” receiving a fourth Emmy nomination for her work. In 2007, she joined the cast of Showtime’s “The L Word.” She returned for a second season in 2008. Most recently, Matlin competed on Season 6 of “Dancing with the Stars.”

Matlin published a novel for children entitled “Deaf Child Crossing” in 2002, followed by “Nobody’s Perfect,” in summer 2006, and “Leading Ladies” in 2007. She has appeared on Sesame Street. She has also performed “The Star-Spangled Banner” in sign language for two Super Bowls.

In 1994, Matlin was appointed by President Clinton and confirmed by the Senate to the Board of Directors for the Corporation for National Service. In 1995, Matlin served as Chairperson for National Volunteer Week, and was honored in a White House Rose Garden ceremony by the President.

Matlin serves as a national spokesperson for The American Red Cross. In 1992, she was instrumental in getting Congress to pass federal legislation requiring all TVs manufactured in the U.S. be equipped with closed-captioning technology. She serves on the boards of a number of charitable organizations. She has also combined her charity work with commercial ventures and has appeared in numerous commercials and public service announcements, on behalf of corporate sponsors such as Target, Sprint, and Toys R Us, each designed to raise awareness about the importance of donating to charitable organizations. In 2006, Matlin was honored by America Online as Chief Everything Officer, highlighting the important contributions of mothers in both home and work environments.

In April 2009, Matlin released her bestselling memoir “I’ll Scream Later,” published by Simon and Shuster. Currently, Matlin is developing a half-hour comedy for Showtime with writer/producer Carol Leifer.

Matlin makes her home in the greater Los Angeles area. She and her husband have four children.

 

Restaurant Survey Results

March 1, 2011 in Education & Outreach, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

We are excited to have so many participants sharing their experiences.  Because of the large amount of information, we have changed our format and put the results in a PDF spread sheet. 

 

Restaurant Survey

February 27, 2011 in Hearing Loss & Deafness, NVRC Announcements

Conversation Impossible

 

Do you enjoy checking out new neighborhood restaurants? Are you a person who can’t wait to visit a restaurant that got a good review to learn whether its cuisine really is the best?

You eagerly make your reservation and arrive full of anticipation, mouth watering as you read the tempting menu…but then, like many of us with a hearing loss, find having a conversation almost impossible.

Yes, the food is great, the atmosphere is lovely, your dinner companion is delightful, but it takes herculean effort to speech read. 

Only through sheer concentration do you catch the drift of the conversation and you leave exhausted and frustrated. Washington Post food critic Tom Sietsema’s restaurant reviews give information about the decibel level. This is useful information, but more specifics would be helpful for those of us who contend with hearing loss. For instance, how busy and how loud does it get at lunch time? Are there good sound absorbing materials on the walls and floors? Is a booth available that gives better acoustics or an area in the restaurant that is quieter?

Although we can’t change the restaurant environment, it would be helpful to know what to expect once we get there.

This is where we need your help, and your opinion matters!

Share with us your experience by clicking on the link below or the Restaurant Survey button on our home page. Answer five short questions and then rate the restaurant racket!

NVRC will compile the reviews and make them available through our website, so be sure to check back often.

Mission Accomplished?
Finished dining and ready to
fill out the survey?

two spies

Click here to link to the Survey

Click here for Survey Updates

For restaurant communication tips, check the NVRC fact sheet:

RestaurantStrategies 5-08

Articles:
Restaurant Noise
Restaurant Acoustics
Noise in Restaurants: Consumers Sound Off