Interpreting & Transliterating - Archive

Demand for sign-language interpreters soars

November 19, 2015 in Interpreting & Transliterating


Orlando Sentinel
By Susan Jacobson
Oct. 28,2015

At basketball games, theme parks, schools and businesses in Central Florida, sign-language interpreters bridge the gap between the hearing and deaf worlds.

Florida has more than 3 million deaf and hard-of-hearing people, according to the Florida Coordinating Council for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing. Nearly 30 percent more interpreters and translators will be required in the state by 2022, according to the state.

To meet the need, Valencia College is planning to ask the Florida Department of Education to let it add a four-year, American Sign Language-interpretation degree starting in 2017. The program would focus on preparing students for regional jobs in the hospitality, health and education industries, according to a Valencia document submitted to the state.

Currently, Valencia’s sign-language students must transfer to the University of North Florida or the University of South Florida to earn a bachelor’s degree.

Read More  . . . Demand for sign-language interpreters

New rules would raise bar for paid sign language interpreters

November 19, 2015 in Interpreting & Transliterating



October 24, 2015

She isn’t deaf, but Margie Propp says she’s more comfortable signing than speaking.

Her father, who lost his hearing at age 15, helped found the Nebraska Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, a state advocacy group. Her mother, one of the commission’s first staffers, grew up deaf and came from a deaf family.

Propp’s older brother is deaf, too, and her other siblings use sign language to make a living.

But none of that automatically qualifies Propp to be a sign language interpreter, she said.

Professional interpreters must listen, understand and sign almost simultaneously, all while removing or reinserting extraneous words that would make signing nearly impossible but are necessary in a spoken conversation. They also require ethics training, vocabulary for special scenarios — even lessons on what clothes to wear so their hands are clearly visible.

Read more  . . . New rules

Wearable ASL Translation Technology

November 19, 2015 in Interpreting & Transliterating, Research, Technology



Language Magazine
by admin34
November 17th, 2015

Roozbeh Jafari, Associate Professor for the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Texas A&M University is leading the development of a tool for American Sign Language (ASL) translation. While previous attempts for automatic ASL translation have largely relied on cameras and visual tracking technology, Jafari’s project tracks muscle movement and external motion. “The sensor is based on EMG, or electromyogram technology,” Jafari said. “Combined with the external motion sensors, which show us the overall hand movement, the EMG allows us to discriminate between gestures,” he said. “A fine-grain of interpretation […] motion sensors give us the overall sense and muscle activities give us information about the fine-grained intent.”

The prototype was revealed this past June at the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) 12th Annual Body Sensor Networks Conference,   . . .

Read More  . . . ASL Translation Technology

Related Article from DOGO News –  By Kim Bussing on October 30, 2015

Call for Interpreters – PCRID Conference Nov. 7 – Nov. 8

October 22, 2015 in Community Events, Interpreting & Transliterating


Interpreters needed! 

The PCRID conference is just a few weeks away and we are looking for well-qualified interpreters to make the conference accessible to all.

Nov. 7 – Nov. 8, 2015
Embassy Suites,
Baltimore’s Inner Harbor.
222 St. Paul Place, Baltimore, MD, 21202.

Visit the website for more info and to apply!

Don’t want to interpret, but want to attend the conference?

Registration prices go up on Oct. 27th; don’t delay. Visit the website to register!

Deaf community lacks interpreters and support, advocates say

October 6, 2015 in Community News, Interpreting & Transliterating


Suggestions include four-year interpreter training and incentives for businesses.

October 2, 2015
By Caitlin McArthur
Capital News Service

LANSING, MI — Continued shortages of qualified interpreters and funding mean Michigan’s deaf, deafblind and hard of hearing residents lack access to proper communication and education, and many are unclear of their rights under state law, advocates say.

Michigan has a shortage of accessible mental health services, education, employment and legal services for these residents, said Todd Morrison, director of the Michigan Deaf Association.

About a million Michigan residents experience hearing loss, and about 90,000 identify as deaf. The majority consider themselves hard of hearing or later-deafened — meaning they were deafened after adolescence, having grown up as part of the hearing population, Morrison said.

But the state has only about 500 registered and certified hearing and sign language interpreters to assist this population. And 90 percent of those interpreters are self-employed, which means they can choose not to respond to emergency calls or work nights or weekends, Morrison said.

Read More . . . Interpreters

NCIEC – Deaf Self-Advocacy Training – Oct. 17th

September 17, 2015 in Community News, Interpreting & Transliterating



National Consortium of Interpreter Education Centers

Deaf Self-Advocacy Training

Virginia Beach
Saturday, October 17th
9 am to 5 pm

This workshop will focus on your rights to equal communication access, utilizing resources for action, ethics and professionalism and working with interpreters and advocating for yourself and for others.

Facilitated by:  Kelsey Gilstrap and Star Grieser

Workshop cost is $5.00 to help contribute to printing and lunch expenses.
The workshop will be presented in American Sign Language and is for Deaf, by Deaf.
Please contact Star Grieser at for any other accommodations.

Email to register for this workshop.

This DSAT training will be located at Tidewater Community College’s Virginia Beach Campus at 1700 College Crescent, Virginia Beach, VA 23453 in the Pungo Building and follow the signs to the room!

DOWNLOAD – NCIEC-training-flyer


Let’s Talk (or Sign!) About the Deaf, Not Hearing Interpreters

June 11, 2015 in Hearing Loss & Deafness, Interpreting & Transliterating



By Caroline Zola

A few days ago, a good friend and fellow linguaphile posted a video on my Facebook wall of Shelby Mitchusson, a hearing American Sign Language (ASL) interpreter translating Eminem’s anthemic “Lose Yourself,” signing with dramatic facial expression and full body motion as she attempts to convey the essence of Slim Shady. The video now has more than 3 million views.

In the fall of 2013, Amber Galloway Gallego became a YouTube sensation after video of her signing a Kendrick Lamar concert also garnered millions of views. Countless articles (here, herehere, and here, to cite a few) lauded Gallego’s signing as “epic” and called her “a true inspiration.” Of course, what she’s doing is a service to the Deaf community. Music is something that all people, regardless of their hearing status, should be able to appreciate and understand, and to convey the rhythm and spirit of Kendrick Lamar into a form of expression the deaf and hard of hearing can process is inherently valuable. Mitchusson and Gallego went viral because their videos are not simply a detached interpretation. They’re excitingly interpretive.

But what are we really doing when we label ASL with words like “epic” or “cool”? We are exoticizing and trivializing it. ASL (and all sign languages—remember, there isn’t just one!) is a language every bit as much as English, with its own rules of grammar, its own syntax, morphology, phonology, and semantics. It is not “cool” or “interesting” or “awesome,” but rather a practical and evolving way of communicating that deserves as much respect as any spoken language. To share a video of someone signing with the caption “look how cool this is!” perpetuates the misconception that sign languages are somehow different, a kind of sideshow novelty at which to marvel.

Read more . . . view video, picture . . . .




ASL at the NGA: An Introduction to the National Gallery Collection – June 14

June 5, 2015 in Community Events, Interpreting & Transliterating



The National Gallery of Art
ASL at the NGA: An Introduction to the National Gallery Collection

The monthly ASL at the NGA tour is coming up on Sunday, June 14 at 1:00 pm.

The tour meets in the Rotunda of the West Building of the National Gallery of Art.

For more information click here

All are welcome!

Other The National Gallery of Art Services –

ASL Video Tour
We now have a free self-guided ASL video tour available for use in the galleries!  The Director’s Tour (West Building highlights) has been interpreted into 27 ASL videos.  Stop by the Acoustiguide desk just inside the Mall entrance on Madison Avenue to check out an Acoustiguide device and receive written instructions on accessing the tour.

Assistive Listening Devices Available
ALDs are available for use on any public tour with three weeks’ advance notice if possible.  To view a full listing of tours visit www.nga.govand click on the “Calendar” tab near the upper right corner.  Then contact Lorena Baines at or 202-842-6905 to arrange the use of ALDs.


TCS and VRID Presents: Everyday Interpreting: What’s Linguistics Got to Do With It?

June 3, 2015 in Interpreting & Transliterating


TCS and VRID Presents: Everyday Interpreting: What’s Linguistics Got to Do With It?
By Miako Rankin
June 20th — 8:30am to 3:45pm — $65 in advance — 0.6 CEUs
Gallaudet University SAC Flex Rooms

DAS and VRID Presents: 50 Shades of Health & Sexuality Education

June 3, 2015 in Interpreting & Transliterating


For Interpreters
By Emily Claveau M.S. Ed., CDI
June 13th — 9am to 4pm — $75 — 0.6 CEUs
DoubleTree by Hilton in Silver Spring, MD
For more info contact:

Hospitals’ failure to provide interpreter for deaf man led to his death, suit claims

May 26, 2015 in Disability Law, Hearing Loss & Deafness, Interpreting & Transliterating



Daily News
Tuesday, May 26, 2015,

New York – A deaf man suffering from end-stage kidney disease died alone at home on his birthday because two city-run hospitals didn’t have sign-language interpreters available to explain to him the seriousness of his condition, according to a lawsuit.

Andre Berry, 52, died Nov. 5, 2013, with a hospital catheter still attached to his body, his grieving sister told the Daily News.

“I was with him in the hospitals so many times and we would ask for an interpreter, and they would say we would have to wait for one to be paged and they never came. They never came,” said Denise Berry, 52.

“They treated him like he was a regular hearing person, and he wasn’t. He had special needs, and they never helped him, never gave him the interpreters that by law he was entitled to,” the distraught sibling said.

Read More  . . . Deaf Man Dies

Register today for VAD 2015 Biennial Conference! June 25-27

May 7, 2015 in Community Events, Education & Outreach, Interpreting & Transliterating



Register today for VAD’s 59th Biennial Conference at Roanoke, VA June 25-27, 2015!
The Conference will be held at Holiday Inn Valley View in Roanoke.

  • Read the attached Welcome Letter to know who worked hard to bring you this event!
  • Curious about the schedule? Read attached Tentative Program Agenda.
  • Order your ticket here! Combo Ticket Form
  • Need a place to stay? Hotel Reservation Form
  • Know some outstanding ASL performers? Invite them to VAD’s Got Talent Show! Attached flyer.

Have questions? Contact Theresa Farmer,

DOWNLOAD – VAD Conference Welcome Letter

DOWNLOAD – VAD Final Program Agenda

DOWNLOAD – VAD Talent Flyer

Deaf prisoner sues Onondaga County, NY over lack of sign-language interpreter at Justice Center

April 24, 2015 in Disability Law, Interpreting & Transliterating
By John O’Brien

SYRACUSE, N.Y. — A deaf inmate is suing Onondaga County over the lack of any sign language interpreters at the Justice Center jail.

Joseph Williams, 39, sued the county in federal court last week, claiming the county is violating the Americans with Disabilities Act by not providing an interpreter for him.

Williams has been totally deaf since birth, and learned to communicate only through American sign language, according to his lawsuit. He can’t read lips and has a limited ability to read and write, according to his lawyer, Josh Cotter of Legal Services of Central New York.

Williams has been at the Justice Center since November, when he was arrested on burglary charges related to a break-in at a Syracuse home in which copper pipes were stolen.

Read more . . . deaf inmate

Gallaudet partners with Central Piedmont Community College

March 12, 2015 in Community News, Interpreting & Transliterating



Gallaudet partners with Central Piedmont Community College to Enhance Educational Opportunities for Future Sign Language Interpreters

Gallaudet University has established a collaborative agreement with Central Piedmont Community College (CPCC) in Charlotte, North Carolina, to enhance educational opportunities for future sign language interpreters. The partnership allows students in the two-year Associate in Applied Science degree in Interpretation Education program at CPCC to transfer credits into Gallaudet’s four-year Bachelor of Arts in Interpretation (BAI) program. Students will live, study, and interact with deaf and hard of hearing people from the United States and abroad on Gallaudet’s bilingual campus.

Read more  . . . Gallaudet Partners



Workshop – Self-care for Interpreters – April 18th

March 12, 2015 in Community Events, Interpreting & Transliterating



Utilizing the WRAP® system interpreters will learn how to improve their own physical and mental health. WRAP® is the Wellness Recovery Action Plan that teaches participant to identify stressors and develop strategies for improved overall health. Learn about WRAP® and develop your own WRAP® .

Instructors, Beth Klein and CW Tillman, are both certified WRAP facilitators and excited to bring this innovative workshop to the interpreting community. Interpreters, as a profession, are notorious for neglecting themselves. We attend workshops about how to improve our interpreted product, but rarely attend workshops about ourselves.

This workshop is about taking care of YOU!!!!!

Date: April 18th Cost: $60.00
Time: 9am-5:30pm Location:

3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130,
Fairfax, VA 22030

.8 CEU’s are pending and sponsored by VRID.

DOWNLOAD – Updated WRAP flyer with registration link