Interpreting & Transliterating - Archive

Deaf prisoner sues Onondaga County, NY over lack of sign-language interpreter at Justice Center

April 24, 2015 in Disability Law, Interpreting & Transliterating

 

 

syracuse.com
By John O’Brien

SYRACUSE, N.Y. — A deaf inmate is suing Onondaga County over the lack of any sign language interpreters at the Justice Center jail.

Joseph Williams, 39, sued the county in federal court last week, claiming the county is violating the Americans with Disabilities Act by not providing an interpreter for him.

Williams has been totally deaf since birth, and learned to communicate only through American sign language, according to his lawsuit. He can’t read lips and has a limited ability to read and write, according to his lawyer, Josh Cotter of Legal Services of Central New York.

Williams has been at the Justice Center since November, when he was arrested on burglary charges related to a break-in at a Syracuse home in which copper pipes were stolen.

Read more . . . deaf inmate

Gallaudet partners with Central Piedmont Community College

March 12, 2015 in Community News, Interpreting & Transliterating

 

 

Gallaudet partners with Central Piedmont Community College to Enhance Educational Opportunities for Future Sign Language Interpreters

Gallaudet University has established a collaborative agreement with Central Piedmont Community College (CPCC) in Charlotte, North Carolina, to enhance educational opportunities for future sign language interpreters. The partnership allows students in the two-year Associate in Applied Science degree in Interpretation Education program at CPCC to transfer credits into Gallaudet’s four-year Bachelor of Arts in Interpretation (BAI) program. Students will live, study, and interact with deaf and hard of hearing people from the United States and abroad on Gallaudet’s bilingual campus.

Read more  . . . Gallaudet Partners

 

 

Workshop – Self-care for Interpreters – April 18th

March 12, 2015 in Community Events, Interpreting & Transliterating

 

 

Utilizing the WRAP® system interpreters will learn how to improve their own physical and mental health. WRAP® is the Wellness Recovery Action Plan that teaches participant to identify stressors and develop strategies for improved overall health. Learn about WRAP® and develop your own WRAP® .

Instructors, Beth Klein and CW Tillman, are both certified WRAP facilitators and excited to bring this innovative workshop to the interpreting community. Interpreters, as a profession, are notorious for neglecting themselves. We attend workshops about how to improve our interpreted product, but rarely attend workshops about ourselves.

This workshop is about taking care of YOU!!!!!

Date: April 18th Cost: $60.00
Time: 9am-5:30pm Location:

NVRC
3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130,
Fairfax, VA 22030

.8 CEU’s are pending and sponsored by VRID.

DOWNLOAD – Updated WRAP flyer with registration link

 

Internet slang meets American Sign Language

February 26, 2015 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness, Interpreting & Transliterating

 

Hopes&Fears

How do you sign “new” words? The Deaf community works as a network, collectively brainstorming new sign language terms over the web, until dominant signs emerge.

As language evolves, the powers that regulate language tend to shift. Just look at the Oxford English Dictionary, who added terms like “duck face,” “lolcat,” and “hawt” to their prestigious lexicon this past December. For the English-speaking world, these additions are anywhere from ridiculous to annoying but at the end of the day, the terms are accepted and agreed upon.

But how do these new, internet-laden turns of phrase enter the sign language community? Was there a way of expressing “selfie” in ASL, was there a sign for “photobomb?” Our simplistic question turned into a larger conversation about the nature of communication.

See interactive page & read more . . . Internet slang
(Loads very slow be patient – requires Adobe Flash)

Wife of New York sign-language interpreter explains his ‘expressive’ style

January 29, 2015 in Community News, Interpreting & Transliterating

 

 

CBC/Radio-Canada
January 28, 2015

He’s been described as “mesmerizing,” “distracting” and even “ridiculous.” Jonathan Lamberton is a deaf New York City sign-language interpreter whose animated signing alongside Mayor Bill de Blasio has gained him notoriety, most recently on The Daily Show. However, Lamberton’s wife Andria Alefhi wants to set the record straight about her husband’s big expressions.

“There’s actually nothing really exaggerated about it, so the joke is kinda on everyone else,” Alefhi tells As It Happens co-host Carol Off. “Everyone in the know just looks at him and says, ‘Yep, that’s a person doing American sign language. It’s good. It’s clear.'”

Alefhi explains that she often works alongside her deaf husband, interpreting what is said to him, who then signs it again.

Why is this necessary? It’s because she has an accent.

“Some deaf people only understand another deaf person or it’s easier to understand a deaf person with that accent removed,” she explains. “It’s not just an accent, there’s actually grammatical components. There’s actually quite a bit to it. But for the average person watching, they probably wouldn’t know the difference.”

READ More  . . .See Photo’s and Video

Related Article – NYC Mayor’s Vibrant Deaf Interpreter Creates His Own Storm ABC News – Jan 29, 2015

Waynesboro, VA student fights JMU language policy

January 29, 2015 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness, Interpreting & Transliterating

 

 

The News Virginian
By LAUREN BERG
January 25, 2015

Waynesboro High School junior Michelle Smith wants nothing more than to go to James Madison University and pursue a career in social work.

To prepare, she knew she would have to keep up her grades, participate in extracurricular activities and write a stellar admissions essay. But what she didn’t anticipate was that her dream school would not accept her three years of American Sign Language credits to fulfill the foreign language requirement.

“I want to go to JMU and they’re making me take Spanish, even though I’ve taken three years of ASL,” said Smith, who enjoys learning sign language but had to make the abrupt change to make sure she can go to her dream school.

“She has her heart set on going to JMU and didn’t want to take another foreign language,” said Kristen Werle, Waynesboro High School’s ASL teacher.

With the help of her high school sign language teacher, therapist and mother, Smith crafted a letter and a petition she plans to send to JMU, as well as U.S. Rep. Bob Goodlatte, R-Roanoke, and U.S. Sens. Mark Warner and Timothy Kaine, both former Virginia Democratic governors.

“It is a language and there are a lot of deaf people, and I think it should be considered,” Smith said. “I mean, if you can sit in class and learn it, and actually have a conversation with someone who’s deaf, then it’s a language.”

“There’s no reason for it not to be a language or to not be considered a language,” she added.

 

Read More  . . 

Sia’s SNL Mime and Sign Language in Pop Music

January 23, 2015 in Community News, Interpreting & Transliterating

 

 

Huff Post Impact
By Lydia L. Callis
Sign Language Interpreter, Community Educator, Advocate
01/20/2015

Last weekend, singer/songwriter Sia was accompanied by a noteworthy performer as she sang her hit “Chandelier” on Saturday Night Live. With his face painted white like a mime, the visual performer used a mix of expressive American Sign Language and interpretive gestures to bring Sia’s words to life. On one hand, it is refreshing to see musical interpreting on a show that has such a wide audience. But on the other hand, perhaps there are more inclusionary and culturally competent ways to incorporate elements of Deaf culture into pop music.

There is a fine line between showcasing the beauty of ASL, and utilizing sign language as a gimmick. Hearing artists often toe this line without even considering the opportunities that exist for better collaboration. To give an example, there was a bit of controversy surrounding the use of ASL in Paul McCartney’s “My Valentine” video. The simplistic black and white video features Johnny Depp and Natalie Portman, neither of whom are native ASL users, each facing the camera and signing lyrics. Deaf individuals were quick to notice a number of errors in the actors’ signing — including both Portman and Depp appearing to interpret “tampon” instead of “appear.” (Whoops!)

Read More Watch Video

Imagination Stage – Upcoming ASL-Interpreted Sunday Fun-Days!

January 16, 2015 in Community Events, Education & Outreach, Families, Interpreting & Transliterating

imagination_stage

Don’t Miss These ASL-Interpreted
Sunday Fun-Day Workshops  For Your Little One!

Tailored to ages 1-3, our Sunday Fun-Day Workshops invite you and your child to bring your favorite stories to life through dramatic play activities, movement, music, and visual art. Each session you leave with a completed craft, as well as a Parent Pack to extend the experience at home.

Upcoming ASL-Interpreted Sunday Fun-Day Workshops include:

  • Jan. 25Ferdinand the Bull
  • Feb. 1: Building a House
  • Feb. 8: The Rainbow Fish
  • Feb. 15: My Heart is Like a Zoo
  • Feb. 22The Little Engine That Could
  • March 1Where the Wild Things Are

Classes are 10:00 a.m.-10:45 a.m., and registration is $10.

For more information, visit us online or contact Early Childhood Program Manager Julia Krebs Patterson.

                               Register today before space fills up!

MassAHEC Network, Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing collaborating on new program for sign language interpreters

January 16, 2015 in Community News, Interpreting & Transliterating

 

 

UMASS Med Now
By Ellen Moran
December 18, 2014

The rising demand for American Sign Language (ASL) interpreters who have the proficiency and comfort to perform in a health care setting led to the development of a new training program offered by UMass Medical School, MassHealth, and the Massachusetts Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing.

The 16-hour program, An Introduction to Medical Interpreting, debuted this fall and will be offered again next spring. The program teaches American Sign Language interpreters with little to no medical training how to work with medical terminology, clinical procedures and ethical issues in health care settings.

“The demand for ASL interpreters with extensive knowledge of health care situations is higher than the commission can supply,” said Lisa Morris, MS, director of Cross-Cultural Initiatives at UMass Medical School’s Massachusetts Area Health Education Center (MassAHEC) Network. MassAHEC is a unit within the Commonwealth Medicine division.

Finding a doctor who uses communication supports such as ASL interpreters, CART reporters and other aids was reported as a big problem by more than 50 percent of those who responded to a health needs assessment of people with disabilities in Massachusetts. The assessment, the results of which were released in April, wasconducted by researchers at UMass Medical School’s Disability, Health and Employment Unit and the Health and Disability Program at the state Department of Public Health.

Read More . . .

ASL Interpreted Performance of The Comedy of Errors Nov. 20th

November 4, 2014 in Community Events, Interpreting & Transliterating

 

 

The American Shakespeare Center is delighted to announce a special public presentation of The Comedy of Errors  with ASL interpreters Lindsey Snyder and Corrie Pond from Washington, DC interpreting.  This event happens on November 20 at 7:30 pm, with a pre-show beginning at 7:00 pm. Please tell everyone you know who may be interested in attending, we hope to see lots of folks for this funny play.

Lindsey and Corrie encourage you to get tickets in rows C-I, seats 5-12.  Those seats are currently held for you in the online ticketing system, so please phone (1-877-MuchAdo) or email (tickets@americanshakespearecenter.com) to request ASL reserved seats.  The box office team is looking forward to helping you secure your seats and we look forward to seeing you at the show.

Please let me know if you have any questions, we will have an interpreter in the Box Office the night of the performance to help you find your seats and work with the staff. We hope to see you there.

Best,
Sarah Enloe

American Shakespeare Center
Director of Education
540-885-5588 x28

The American Shakespeare Center recovers the joy and accessibility of Shakespeare’s theatre, language, and humanity by exploring the English Renaissance stage and its practices through performance and education.

TheComedyofErrors

Notice of Change: Interpreter Services for 12-Step Programs and Funerals

October 30, 2014 in Community News, Interpreting & Transliterating

Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services Center, Inc.

Background:
On October 15, 2014, Governor McAuliffe announced changes in the State budget for Fiscal Year 2015 (July 1, 2014 – June 30, 2015).  The original budget, approved by the General Assembly and the Governor earlier in 2014, was based on estimates of how much money the state expected to collect (revenue projections) from taxes, fees, etc.  Cuts to the budget are necessary because such revenue collections have been down in the Commonwealth.  When he announced the cuts, the Governor said, “Making these budget reductions has been the most difficult experience of my term so far. In a government as lean and well-run as ours, there are few spending cuts you can make without impacting the lives of Virginians.”

When budget cuts have been made in the past, the Virginia Department for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (VDDHH) has been able to maintain a stable level of direct services.  Unfortunately, the cuts announced last week include a reduction in funding for the Interpreter Services Program (ISP) for Fiscal Year 2015.  Specifically, VDDHH will have to reduce the interpreter services provided for 12-step meetings and funerals through June 30, 2015.  We do not know if we will be able to restore these services for Fiscal Year 2016, which starts on July 1, 2015; it will depend upon the budget approved by the 2015 General Assembly. 

About Sign Language Interpreters for 12-Step Meetings (Alcoholics Anonymous/AA; Narcotics Anonymous/NA)
Effective November 1, 2014, VDDHH will not be able to pay for sign language interpreters for 12-Step (AA/NA) meetings.  We are working with Alcoholics Anonymous of Virginia Special Needs Committees to find out how local chapters can support the cost of interpreters for these meetings.

There are some other resources that can support Deaf people with substance abuse issues:

  • If you are a client of a Community Services Board (CSB), you should ask about communication access (and related funding) for your meetings.
  • There are online 12-step meetings available for Deaf people.
  • Deaf Off Drugs and Alcohol (DODA) has a website that includes information and access to online meetings, and a link to DODA’s schedule of meetings. Here is the link: http://www.med.wright.edu/citar/sardi/doda.

 

About Sign Language Interpreters for Funerals and Memorial Services
Effective November 1, 2014, VDDHH will not be able to pay for sign language interpreters for visitations, funerals or memorial services.  Families should ask the funeral home to provide an interpreter.   The funeral home can contact VDDHH at 804-662-9502 for help in locating an interpreter but VDDHH will not be able to pay for the interpreter.  VDDHH will be working to provide more information to funeral home directors about the need for interpreters. If you have a complaint about a funeral home because it does not provide effective communication, you may be able to file an Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) complaint.  For more information, you may contact:

 

If you have any questions about these changes, please contact VDDHH at 804-662-9502.

 

 

 

Deaf Interpreter Goes Viral

October 30, 2014 in Interpreting & Transliterating

 

 

The Blog
10/27/2014
Lydia L. Callis
Sign Language Interpreter, Community Educator, Advocate

Last week, Mayor Bill de Blasio addressed the citizens of New York to discuss the city’s first confirmed case of Ebola. During the press conference the mayor’s ASL interpreter, Jonathan Lamberton, gained a bit of attention on the Internet. Most of the commentary centered around Lamberton’s expressiveness, which is actually just part of sign language, but missed the most compelling aspect of this particular interpreter: he is Deaf.

For hearing people who do not have any experience with Deaf culture, it might be hard to understand how Certified Deaf Interpreters (CDI) are used, and why they are necessary. In this instance, the CDI was working as a team with a hearing interpreter who sat in the audience. The hearing interpreter was signing the message to Lamberton, who was interpreting it on camera. But why have two interpreters?

New York City is truly a melting pot with people of all ethnic backgrounds, education levels, and ability. In times when peoples’ health or lives might be in danger, communication becomes absolutely critical. There is no room for miscommunication when state officials are addressing the public safety.

Utilizing an interpreter whose native language is ASL can be a good match when your audience is unknown. While a high quality hearing interpreter may be able to do a great job, a CDI has the ability to reach ASL users on every level. This ensures that the message is conveyed to a broad audience.

Deaf people who use sign language to communicate may read and write English quite well; or they may not know English at all. Many deaf people have excellent ASL skills, while others only know informal sign languages called “home signs.” Additionally, in a large city like New York there is a whole audience of foreign born deaf people for whom ASL is a second language.

Read entire article  . . .

Sign Language Humor

August 28, 2014 in Interpreting & Transliterating

 

 

360 Translations International Inc.
Blog
August 22, 2014
Article Source

When you think about physical comedy, there may be a flash of images of the silent comedians or the absurd leg movements of John Cleese (he had a hip replacement surgery). But the role of physical movements in comedy is not just confined to one-note jokes or slapstick genre. It goes beyond that. Even the most word-oriented humor depends on a facial expression or subtle gestures.

Take, for instance, jokes that are entirely based on wordplay. Jimmy Carr—an expert of this type of humor entertainment—may be a self-acclaimed ventriloquist, but a confused head movement here and raised eyebrow there abruptly makes the jokes funnier than wordplay alone.

Importance of Facial Expressions to Convey Humor in Deaf Community

Indeed, facial expressions or gestures are an important part of comedy performances. Another community, to whom gesture is particularly important, is the deaf community. Like every community and culture enjoys humor, the hearing impaired does as well.

A lot of what is amusing for hearing people is amusing for hearing impaired. However, there are some types of comedies that one group likes more than the other. The role of humor in the deaf community is quite significant and slightly different from what you observe among hearing people. Two important aspects that help with better interpretation of humor . . .

Read More . . .

Broadcast captioner explanation of work in humorous GIFs

August 21, 2014 in Captioning / Relay, Interpreting & Transliterating, Technology

 

 

 

A broadcast captioner has created a hysterically funny account of what it’s like to do what she does – sure to go viral if it hasn’t already:

http://frecklesandfizz.blogspot.com/2014/08/broadcast-captioner-gifs.html

Definitely something to pass on !

Cheryl

Deaf-Parented Interpreters: We Want YOU!

August 1, 2014 in Community News, Interpreting & Transliterating

 

NCIEC

First of its kind, study of deaf-parented interpreters

If you meet these criteria, please participate in this 20-minute survey.

ASL version: http://youtu.be/0dTLQImr2iM.

  • You have one or more deaf parents
  • You used signed language in your home while growing up
  • You identify as Deaf, Hard of Hearing, hearing, and/or Coda
  • You work as an ASL/English interpreter now OR have ever worked as an ASL/English interpreter

YOU can be a part of a study that aims to contribute to the understanding of training and educational experiences of deaf-parented interpreters.

This survey link will be available for responses until August 30th, 2014.

Principal researcher, Amy Williamson, is the daughter of deaf parents, Mary Ella Scarboro Williamson and Barney Williamson of North Carolina. Amy has worked as an ASL/English interpreter since 1990 and is conducting this research as partial fulfillment for a Masters degree in Interpreting Studies at Western Oregon University under the supervision of Pamela Cancel.

Thank you!

Amy