Interpreting & Transliterating - Archive

Let’s Talk (or Sign!) About the Deaf, Not Hearing Interpreters

June 11, 2015 in Hearing Loss & Deafness, Interpreting & Transliterating

 

 

Slate
By Caroline Zola
June10,2015

A few days ago, a good friend and fellow linguaphile posted a video on my Facebook wall of Shelby Mitchusson, a hearing American Sign Language (ASL) interpreter translating Eminem’s anthemic “Lose Yourself,” signing with dramatic facial expression and full body motion as she attempts to convey the essence of Slim Shady. The video now has more than 3 million views.

In the fall of 2013, Amber Galloway Gallego became a YouTube sensation after video of her signing a Kendrick Lamar concert also garnered millions of views. Countless articles (here, herehere, and here, to cite a few) lauded Gallego’s signing as “epic” and called her “a true inspiration.” Of course, what she’s doing is a service to the Deaf community. Music is something that all people, regardless of their hearing status, should be able to appreciate and understand, and to convey the rhythm and spirit of Kendrick Lamar into a form of expression the deaf and hard of hearing can process is inherently valuable. Mitchusson and Gallego went viral because their videos are not simply a detached interpretation. They’re excitingly interpretive.

But what are we really doing when we label ASL with words like “epic” or “cool”? We are exoticizing and trivializing it. ASL (and all sign languages—remember, there isn’t just one!) is a language every bit as much as English, with its own rules of grammar, its own syntax, morphology, phonology, and semantics. It is not “cool” or “interesting” or “awesome,” but rather a practical and evolving way of communicating that deserves as much respect as any spoken language. To share a video of someone signing with the caption “look how cool this is!” perpetuates the misconception that sign languages are somehow different, a kind of sideshow novelty at which to marvel.

Read more . . . view video, picture . . . .

 

 

 

ASL at the NGA: An Introduction to the National Gallery Collection – June 14

June 5, 2015 in Community Events, Interpreting & Transliterating

 

 

The National Gallery of Art
ASL at the NGA: An Introduction to the National Gallery Collection

The monthly ASL at the NGA tour is coming up on Sunday, June 14 at 1:00 pm.

The tour meets in the Rotunda of the West Building of the National Gallery of Art.

For more information click here

All are welcome!

Other The National Gallery of Art Services –

ASL Video Tour
We now have a free self-guided ASL video tour available for use in the galleries!  The Director’s Tour (West Building highlights) has been interpreted into 27 ASL videos.  Stop by the Acoustiguide desk just inside the Mall entrance on Madison Avenue to check out an Acoustiguide device and receive written instructions on accessing the tour.

Assistive Listening Devices Available
ALDs are available for use on any public tour with three weeks’ advance notice if possible.  To view a full listing of tours visit www.nga.govand click on the “Calendar” tab near the upper right corner.  Then contact Lorena Baines at access@nga.gov or 202-842-6905 to arrange the use of ALDs.

 

TCS and VRID Presents: Everyday Interpreting: What’s Linguistics Got to Do With It?

June 3, 2015 in Interpreting & Transliterating

 

TCS and VRID Presents: Everyday Interpreting: What’s Linguistics Got to Do With It?
By Miako Rankin
June 20th — 8:30am to 3:45pm — $65 in advance — 0.6 CEUs
Gallaudet University SAC Flex Rooms
Register: http://goo.gl/HzlyDe 
Questions: Kevin.Dyels@tcsinterpreting.com

DAS and VRID Presents: 50 Shades of Health & Sexuality Education

June 3, 2015 in Interpreting & Transliterating

 

For Interpreters
By Emily Claveau M.S. Ed., CDI
June 13th — 9am to 4pm — $75 — 0.6 CEUs
DoubleTree by Hilton in Silver Spring, MD
For more info contact: development@deafaccess.com

Hospitals’ failure to provide interpreter for deaf man led to his death, suit claims

May 26, 2015 in Disability Law, Hearing Loss & Deafness, Interpreting & Transliterating

 

 

Daily News
BY GINGER ADAMS OTIS
Tuesday, May 26, 2015,

New York – A deaf man suffering from end-stage kidney disease died alone at home on his birthday because two city-run hospitals didn’t have sign-language interpreters available to explain to him the seriousness of his condition, according to a lawsuit.

Andre Berry, 52, died Nov. 5, 2013, with a hospital catheter still attached to his body, his grieving sister told the Daily News.

“I was with him in the hospitals so many times and we would ask for an interpreter, and they would say we would have to wait for one to be paged and they never came. They never came,” said Denise Berry, 52.

“They treated him like he was a regular hearing person, and he wasn’t. He had special needs, and they never helped him, never gave him the interpreters that by law he was entitled to,” the distraught sibling said.

Read More  . . . Deaf Man Dies

Register today for VAD 2015 Biennial Conference! June 25-27

May 7, 2015 in Community Events, Education & Outreach, Interpreting & Transliterating

 

 

Register today for VAD’s 59th Biennial Conference at Roanoke, VA June 25-27, 2015!
The Conference will be held at Holiday Inn Valley View in Roanoke.

  • Read the attached Welcome Letter to know who worked hard to bring you this event!
  • Curious about the schedule? Read attached Tentative Program Agenda.
  • Order your ticket here! Combo Ticket Form
  • Need a place to stay? Hotel Reservation Form
  • Know some outstanding ASL performers? Invite them to VAD’s Got Talent Show! Attached flyer.

Have questions? Contact Theresa Farmer, farmerta@aol.com

DOWNLOAD – VAD Conference Welcome Letter

DOWNLOAD – VAD Final Program Agenda

DOWNLOAD – VAD Talent Flyer

Deaf prisoner sues Onondaga County, NY over lack of sign-language interpreter at Justice Center

April 24, 2015 in Disability Law, Interpreting & Transliterating

 

 

syracuse.com
By John O’Brien

SYRACUSE, N.Y. — A deaf inmate is suing Onondaga County over the lack of any sign language interpreters at the Justice Center jail.

Joseph Williams, 39, sued the county in federal court last week, claiming the county is violating the Americans with Disabilities Act by not providing an interpreter for him.

Williams has been totally deaf since birth, and learned to communicate only through American sign language, according to his lawsuit. He can’t read lips and has a limited ability to read and write, according to his lawyer, Josh Cotter of Legal Services of Central New York.

Williams has been at the Justice Center since November, when he was arrested on burglary charges related to a break-in at a Syracuse home in which copper pipes were stolen.

Read more . . . deaf inmate

Gallaudet partners with Central Piedmont Community College

March 12, 2015 in Community News, Interpreting & Transliterating

 

 

Gallaudet partners with Central Piedmont Community College to Enhance Educational Opportunities for Future Sign Language Interpreters

Gallaudet University has established a collaborative agreement with Central Piedmont Community College (CPCC) in Charlotte, North Carolina, to enhance educational opportunities for future sign language interpreters. The partnership allows students in the two-year Associate in Applied Science degree in Interpretation Education program at CPCC to transfer credits into Gallaudet’s four-year Bachelor of Arts in Interpretation (BAI) program. Students will live, study, and interact with deaf and hard of hearing people from the United States and abroad on Gallaudet’s bilingual campus.

Read more  . . . Gallaudet Partners

 

 

Workshop – Self-care for Interpreters – April 18th

March 12, 2015 in Community Events, Interpreting & Transliterating

 

 

Utilizing the WRAP® system interpreters will learn how to improve their own physical and mental health. WRAP® is the Wellness Recovery Action Plan that teaches participant to identify stressors and develop strategies for improved overall health. Learn about WRAP® and develop your own WRAP® .

Instructors, Beth Klein and CW Tillman, are both certified WRAP facilitators and excited to bring this innovative workshop to the interpreting community. Interpreters, as a profession, are notorious for neglecting themselves. We attend workshops about how to improve our interpreted product, but rarely attend workshops about ourselves.

This workshop is about taking care of YOU!!!!!

Date: April 18th Cost: $60.00
Time: 9am-5:30pm Location:

NVRC
3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130,
Fairfax, VA 22030

.8 CEU’s are pending and sponsored by VRID.

DOWNLOAD – Updated WRAP flyer with registration link

 

Internet slang meets American Sign Language

February 26, 2015 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness, Interpreting & Transliterating

 

Hopes&Fears

How do you sign “new” words? The Deaf community works as a network, collectively brainstorming new sign language terms over the web, until dominant signs emerge.

As language evolves, the powers that regulate language tend to shift. Just look at the Oxford English Dictionary, who added terms like “duck face,” “lolcat,” and “hawt” to their prestigious lexicon this past December. For the English-speaking world, these additions are anywhere from ridiculous to annoying but at the end of the day, the terms are accepted and agreed upon.

But how do these new, internet-laden turns of phrase enter the sign language community? Was there a way of expressing “selfie” in ASL, was there a sign for “photobomb?” Our simplistic question turned into a larger conversation about the nature of communication.

See interactive page & read more . . . Internet slang
(Loads very slow be patient – requires Adobe Flash)

Wife of New York sign-language interpreter explains his ‘expressive’ style

January 29, 2015 in Community News, Interpreting & Transliterating

 

 

CBC/Radio-Canada
January 28, 2015

He’s been described as “mesmerizing,” “distracting” and even “ridiculous.” Jonathan Lamberton is a deaf New York City sign-language interpreter whose animated signing alongside Mayor Bill de Blasio has gained him notoriety, most recently on The Daily Show. However, Lamberton’s wife Andria Alefhi wants to set the record straight about her husband’s big expressions.

“There’s actually nothing really exaggerated about it, so the joke is kinda on everyone else,” Alefhi tells As It Happens co-host Carol Off. “Everyone in the know just looks at him and says, ‘Yep, that’s a person doing American sign language. It’s good. It’s clear.'”

Alefhi explains that she often works alongside her deaf husband, interpreting what is said to him, who then signs it again.

Why is this necessary? It’s because she has an accent.

“Some deaf people only understand another deaf person or it’s easier to understand a deaf person with that accent removed,” she explains. “It’s not just an accent, there’s actually grammatical components. There’s actually quite a bit to it. But for the average person watching, they probably wouldn’t know the difference.”

READ More  . . .See Photo’s and Video

Related Article – NYC Mayor’s Vibrant Deaf Interpreter Creates His Own Storm ABC News – Jan 29, 2015

Waynesboro, VA student fights JMU language policy

January 29, 2015 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness, Interpreting & Transliterating

 

 

The News Virginian
By LAUREN BERG
January 25, 2015

Waynesboro High School junior Michelle Smith wants nothing more than to go to James Madison University and pursue a career in social work.

To prepare, she knew she would have to keep up her grades, participate in extracurricular activities and write a stellar admissions essay. But what she didn’t anticipate was that her dream school would not accept her three years of American Sign Language credits to fulfill the foreign language requirement.

“I want to go to JMU and they’re making me take Spanish, even though I’ve taken three years of ASL,” said Smith, who enjoys learning sign language but had to make the abrupt change to make sure she can go to her dream school.

“She has her heart set on going to JMU and didn’t want to take another foreign language,” said Kristen Werle, Waynesboro High School’s ASL teacher.

With the help of her high school sign language teacher, therapist and mother, Smith crafted a letter and a petition she plans to send to JMU, as well as U.S. Rep. Bob Goodlatte, R-Roanoke, and U.S. Sens. Mark Warner and Timothy Kaine, both former Virginia Democratic governors.

“It is a language and there are a lot of deaf people, and I think it should be considered,” Smith said. “I mean, if you can sit in class and learn it, and actually have a conversation with someone who’s deaf, then it’s a language.”

“There’s no reason for it not to be a language or to not be considered a language,” she added.

 

Read More  . . 

Sia’s SNL Mime and Sign Language in Pop Music

January 23, 2015 in Community News, Interpreting & Transliterating

 

 

Huff Post Impact
By Lydia L. Callis
Sign Language Interpreter, Community Educator, Advocate
01/20/2015

Last weekend, singer/songwriter Sia was accompanied by a noteworthy performer as she sang her hit “Chandelier” on Saturday Night Live. With his face painted white like a mime, the visual performer used a mix of expressive American Sign Language and interpretive gestures to bring Sia’s words to life. On one hand, it is refreshing to see musical interpreting on a show that has such a wide audience. But on the other hand, perhaps there are more inclusionary and culturally competent ways to incorporate elements of Deaf culture into pop music.

There is a fine line between showcasing the beauty of ASL, and utilizing sign language as a gimmick. Hearing artists often toe this line without even considering the opportunities that exist for better collaboration. To give an example, there was a bit of controversy surrounding the use of ASL in Paul McCartney’s “My Valentine” video. The simplistic black and white video features Johnny Depp and Natalie Portman, neither of whom are native ASL users, each facing the camera and signing lyrics. Deaf individuals were quick to notice a number of errors in the actors’ signing — including both Portman and Depp appearing to interpret “tampon” instead of “appear.” (Whoops!)

Read More Watch Video

Imagination Stage – Upcoming ASL-Interpreted Sunday Fun-Days!

January 16, 2015 in Community Events, Education & Outreach, Families, Interpreting & Transliterating

imagination_stage

Don’t Miss These ASL-Interpreted
Sunday Fun-Day Workshops  For Your Little One!

Tailored to ages 1-3, our Sunday Fun-Day Workshops invite you and your child to bring your favorite stories to life through dramatic play activities, movement, music, and visual art. Each session you leave with a completed craft, as well as a Parent Pack to extend the experience at home.

Upcoming ASL-Interpreted Sunday Fun-Day Workshops include:

  • Jan. 25Ferdinand the Bull
  • Feb. 1: Building a House
  • Feb. 8: The Rainbow Fish
  • Feb. 15: My Heart is Like a Zoo
  • Feb. 22The Little Engine That Could
  • March 1Where the Wild Things Are

Classes are 10:00 a.m.-10:45 a.m., and registration is $10.

For more information, visit us online or contact Early Childhood Program Manager Julia Krebs Patterson.

                               Register today before space fills up!

MassAHEC Network, Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing collaborating on new program for sign language interpreters

January 16, 2015 in Community News, Interpreting & Transliterating

 

 

UMASS Med Now
By Ellen Moran
December 18, 2014

The rising demand for American Sign Language (ASL) interpreters who have the proficiency and comfort to perform in a health care setting led to the development of a new training program offered by UMass Medical School, MassHealth, and the Massachusetts Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing.

The 16-hour program, An Introduction to Medical Interpreting, debuted this fall and will be offered again next spring. The program teaches American Sign Language interpreters with little to no medical training how to work with medical terminology, clinical procedures and ethical issues in health care settings.

“The demand for ASL interpreters with extensive knowledge of health care situations is higher than the commission can supply,” said Lisa Morris, MS, director of Cross-Cultural Initiatives at UMass Medical School’s Massachusetts Area Health Education Center (MassAHEC) Network. MassAHEC is a unit within the Commonwealth Medicine division.

Finding a doctor who uses communication supports such as ASL interpreters, CART reporters and other aids was reported as a big problem by more than 50 percent of those who responded to a health needs assessment of people with disabilities in Massachusetts. The assessment, the results of which were released in April, wasconducted by researchers at UMass Medical School’s Disability, Health and Employment Unit and the Health and Disability Program at the state Department of Public Health.

Read More . . .