Wearables - Archive

Better TV Sound for Those With Hearing Loss

August 31, 2016 in Hearing Aids, Technology, Wearables

 

Could a sound bar speaker or the right pair of headphones help you hear the dialogue on your TV again?

Not long ago, a reader wrote to us asking for help with a common problem: Due to hearing loss, she was having a hard time watching television. Even with the volume at maximum level, she couldn’t quite make out the dialogue. What could she do?

For me, the issue hit close to home.

In the later years of his life, my dad struggled to understand what was being said on TV shows. When I called or visited him, the TV was often at full blast. And yet, he complained, that really didn’t help him follow the on-screen conversations. It simply added another layer of commotion.

Read more  . . . TV sound

Don’t Make Us Beg – Gael Hannan

June 16, 2016 in Advocacy & Access, Hearing Aids, Hearing Loss & Deafness, Wearables

 

 

Better Hearing Consumer
By Gael Hannan
June 14, 2016

It’s the kind of news that makes the hard of hearing heart beat faster.

No, there’s been no proclamation of National 50% Off Hearing Aids Day.

No announcement of a little pink pill that will make damaged cochlear hair cells spring back to life.

No scientific proof of a twice-daily mantra that will calm the neurons firing off tinnitus cannons in our heads.

It’s more like a climate change event, with the barometer rising in the world of hearing health care.

On June 2nd, the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NAS) issued what is considered a ground-breaking report: Hearing Health Care for Adults: Priorities for Improving Access and Affordability.  A powerhouse expert committee, comprised of members from all stakeholder groups, assessed the state of hearing health care, its affordability and accessibility for adults in the United States.

Read more . . . Don’t Make Us Beg

NEW Report Released: Hearing Health Care for Adults: Priorities for Improving Access and Affordability

June 2, 2016 in Community News, Hearing Aids, Hearing Loss & Deafness, Technology, Wearables

 

 

The National Academies Of Sciences, Engineering, & Medicine hearingHealth_cover

Date:  June 2, 2016

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Americans Need Easier Access, More Affordable Options for Hearing Health Care, Says New Report; FDA Should Remove Regulation for Medical Evaluation to Purchase Hearing Aids and Create New Category of Over-the-Counter Hearing Devices 

WASHINGTON – Hearing loss is a significant public health concern, and efforts should be made to provide adults with easier access to and more affordable options for hearing health care, especially for those in underserved and vulnerable populations, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.  The committee that carried out the study and wrote the report called for greater transparency and changes in the cost of hearing health care and expanded treatment options given the number of Americans who have hearing loss and the high cost of hearing health care.  It recommended that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration remove the regulation requiring adults to have a medical evaluation or sign an evaluation waiver to purchase a hearing aid, as well as establish a new category of over-the-counter, wearable hearing devices – separate from hearing aids – that could assist adults with mild to moderate hearing loss.  The report does not address surgical devices, such as cochlear implants, and related services.   Read more  . . . Press Release June 2 

Related Links to report:

Hearing Aid Prices Under Pressure From Consumer Electronics

April 26, 2016 in Community News, Hearing Aids, Wearables

 

 

PHOENIX — At the AudiologyNow! convention here last week, visitors stood next to blowing electric fans to experience how a new hearing aid could screen out wind noise. They donned goggles to attend a virtual reality dinner party to learn how new technology made it easier to hear conversations around them.

But the elephant in the room, as it were, was what was happening outside the convention hall.

The consumer electronics industry is encroaching on the hearing aid business, offering products that are far less expensive and available without the involvement of audiologists or other professionals. That is forcing a re-examination of the entire system for providing hearing aids, which critics say is too costly and cumbersome, hindering access to devices vital for the growing legions of older Americans.