Hearing Aids - Archive

When a HoH Meets a Pro

September 27, 2016 in Advocacy & Access, Hearing Aids, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

THE BETTER HEARING CONSUMER
By Gael Hannan

In the hearing loss world that I live in, there are HoHs and there are Pros:

HoH: Refers to a person who has hearing loss and who may also identify as hard of hearing, hearing-impaired, or hearing aid/cochlear implant user. (This term does not refer to all those affected by a person’s hearing loss, such as the moms and dads, life partners, children, and friends.)

Pro:  Refers to someone who works in a hearing healthcare field, such as an audiologist or hearing instrument specialist, but this category also can include an Ear, Nose & Throat doctor, hearing aid manufacturer, and/or an assistive technology sales rep.

…now that we’ve got that out of the way…

If you’re a HoH, you have most likely—hopefully—met a Pro by now. You made an appointment, walked through that door and sat down to discuss your hearing with this Pro.

Read more  . . . . HOH-PRO

Rate of hearing loss increases significantly after age 90

September 22, 2016 in Hearing Aids, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

Hearing aids underused, say authors

Science Daily
Date:
September 19, 2016
Source:
JAMA
Summary:
A new study examined if the rate of age-related hearing loss is constant in the older old (80 years and older). Scientists concluded that hearing loss rapidly accelerates over the age of 90. Furthermore, authors suggest that hearing aids are underused in this population.
In a study published online by JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Anil K. Lalwani, M.D., of the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, and colleagues examined if the rate of age-related hearing loss is constant in the older old (80 years and older).
Read more  . . . hearing loss  . . . after age 90

How To Enjoy A Barbecue With Hearing Loss

August 31, 2016 in Hearing Aids, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

Huffington Post
Shari Eberts 
08/31/2016

I love summer barbecue parties — Memorial Day Weekend, Fourth of July, or just a regular summer weekend. It is fun to gather friends and family to enjoy the summer weather, each other’s company and the casual fare. Parties can be a challenge for people with hearing loss, but barbecues are some of the easiest to navigate. Barbecues are typically outside so the noise doesn’t bounce around the room the way it can at indoor events. Being outdoors also often creates a variety of socializing spots — some might even be relatively quiet! So head to a barbecue this weekend — or host one of your own.

Better TV Sound for Those With Hearing Loss

August 31, 2016 in Hearing Aids, Technology, Wearables

 

Could a sound bar speaker or the right pair of headphones help you hear the dialogue on your TV again?

Not long ago, a reader wrote to us asking for help with a common problem: Due to hearing loss, she was having a hard time watching television. Even with the volume at maximum level, she couldn’t quite make out the dialogue. What could she do?

For me, the issue hit close to home.

In the later years of his life, my dad struggled to understand what was being said on TV shows. When I called or visited him, the TV was often at full blast. And yet, he complained, that really didn’t help him follow the on-screen conversations. It simply added another layer of commotion.

Read more  . . . TV sound

Captioned – Assistive Listening Device Presentation at Greenspring Village

August 11, 2016 in Hearing Aids, Hearing Loss & Deafness, Technology

 

Assistive Listening Device captioned video presentation at the Greenspring Community , Springfield , VA.

Presenters include NVRC’s Debbie Jones, Resource and Technology Specialist and Bonnie O’Leary, Certified Hearing Loss Support Specialist, Outreach Manager

Produced at Greenspring Community – EricksonLiving.com‎

Published on Jul 25, 2016

Directed and Produced by Diane Gatsis Havinga

 

Don’t Make Us Beg – Gael Hannan

June 16, 2016 in Advocacy & Access, Hearing Aids, Hearing Loss & Deafness, Wearables

 

 

Better Hearing Consumer
By Gael Hannan
June 14, 2016

It’s the kind of news that makes the hard of hearing heart beat faster.

No, there’s been no proclamation of National 50% Off Hearing Aids Day.

No announcement of a little pink pill that will make damaged cochlear hair cells spring back to life.

No scientific proof of a twice-daily mantra that will calm the neurons firing off tinnitus cannons in our heads.

It’s more like a climate change event, with the barometer rising in the world of hearing health care.

On June 2nd, the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NAS) issued what is considered a ground-breaking report: Hearing Health Care for Adults: Priorities for Improving Access and Affordability.  A powerhouse expert committee, comprised of members from all stakeholder groups, assessed the state of hearing health care, its affordability and accessibility for adults in the United States.

Read more . . . Don’t Make Us Beg

Panel: Treating hearing loss shouldn’t be a pricey hassle

June 16, 2016 in Community News, Hearing Aids, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

Fredericksburg.com
Posted: Sunday, June 12, 2016
Associated Press |

WASHINGTON—Treating hearing loss shouldn’t be such a pricey hassle. That’s the message from a prestigious government advisory group that’s calling on Medicare and other agencies to find ways to make better hearing more affordable and accessible for millions of older Americans.

One proposal: Allow over-the-counter sales of simple devices for mild hearing problems as an alternative to full hearing aids—much like consumers with vision problems today choose between drugstore reading glasses or prescription bifocals.

The report says action is important because hearing loss isn’t just a struggle for individuals but a growing public health problem, putting untreated seniors at extra risk of social isolation, depression, even dementia.

Read more  . . . government advisory group

NEW Report Released: Hearing Health Care for Adults: Priorities for Improving Access and Affordability

June 2, 2016 in Community News, Hearing Aids, Hearing Loss & Deafness, Technology, Wearables

 

 

The National Academies Of Sciences, Engineering, & Medicine hearingHealth_cover

Date:  June 2, 2016

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Americans Need Easier Access, More Affordable Options for Hearing Health Care, Says New Report; FDA Should Remove Regulation for Medical Evaluation to Purchase Hearing Aids and Create New Category of Over-the-Counter Hearing Devices 

WASHINGTON – Hearing loss is a significant public health concern, and efforts should be made to provide adults with easier access to and more affordable options for hearing health care, especially for those in underserved and vulnerable populations, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.  The committee that carried out the study and wrote the report called for greater transparency and changes in the cost of hearing health care and expanded treatment options given the number of Americans who have hearing loss and the high cost of hearing health care.  It recommended that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration remove the regulation requiring adults to have a medical evaluation or sign an evaluation waiver to purchase a hearing aid, as well as establish a new category of over-the-counter, wearable hearing devices – separate from hearing aids – that could assist adults with mild to moderate hearing loss.  The report does not address surgical devices, such as cochlear implants, and related services.   Read more  . . . Press Release June 2 

Related Links to report:

Are hearing aids taboo?

May 10, 2016 in Community News, Hearing Aids, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

Examiner.com
LIFE | HEALTH & FITNESS | HEALTHCARE
May 9, 2016

 

Why is there such a stigma about hearing loss? Are hearing aids taboo? One in 3 people between the ages of 65 and 74 suffer from presbycusis; the slow loss of hearing as we age. The National Council on Aging suggests that those who do not wear hearing aids are 50% more likely to experience depression, anxiety, paranoia and balance issues and less likely to participate in organized social activities, compared to those who wear hearing aids. A new research from Johns Hopkins University shows that hearing loss may increase your risk of developing dementia. Several studies have shown that those with untreated hearing loss are 3 times more likely to suffer falls than those without.

So why are there such a low percentage of seniors being tested? The average amount of time between noticing hearing loss and seeking treatment is 10 years. The Hearing Loss Association of America (HLAA) believes that the cost of hearing aids is one factor.

Read more  . . . Hearing Aids

How Growing Up Hard Of Hearing Led Me To The Career I Never Knew I Wanted

April 26, 2016 in Hearing Aids, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

ELITE DAILY
Laura Friedman
Apr 10, 2016

Attention deficit, developmental delays, processing disorder: These were the words my parents heard about me from a half dozen doctors, audiologists and speech-language pathologists. But both my parents (and grandmother) work in the medical field, and these diagnoses just didn’t fit what they saw. When my attention was grabbed, I had no issues sitting still or focusing. Simply put, I was not speaking or responding to sounds.

After 18 months of being tested and retested with one misdiagnosis after the next, someone advised my mother to take me to the school district for testing. This was after a year’s worth of constant speech and language therapy. Fearing I would be labeled, my mother initially objected, but eventually she relented, and within minutes of my being tested, the school district informed her I had hearing loss. I was 3 at the time, and this was only the beginning of a long road ahead.

The diagnosis finally made sense. The doctors started talking about hearing aids, schools for the deaf and sign language, and they told my parents I would never be able to function in the hearing world. My parents were devastated; their world was flipped upside down.

Read More  . . . Laura Friedman

Hearing Aid Prices Under Pressure From Consumer Electronics

April 26, 2016 in Community News, Hearing Aids, Wearables

 

 

PHOENIX — At the AudiologyNow! convention here last week, visitors stood next to blowing electric fans to experience how a new hearing aid could screen out wind noise. They donned goggles to attend a virtual reality dinner party to learn how new technology made it easier to hear conversations around them.

But the elephant in the room, as it were, was what was happening outside the convention hall.

The consumer electronics industry is encroaching on the hearing aid business, offering products that are far less expensive and available without the involvement of audiologists or other professionals. That is forcing a re-examination of the entire system for providing hearing aids, which critics say is too costly and cumbersome, hindering access to devices vital for the growing legions of older Americans.

HLAA-DC program on Hearing Needs Assessment – Sunday, May 22

April 21, 2016 in Hearing Aids, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

People with hearing loss often need help in determining how best to address their needs. Hearing aids can be very helpful. But they come with a wide variety of optional features including, but not limited to, telecoils, directional microphones, noise suppression, feedback cancellation, Bluetooth, self-adjusting volume controls, etc. Which ones do you need? And then what other technologies and personal strategies should you consider, recognizing that even well-fitted, top of the line, hearing aids, while very useful, have important limitations? Finding the right answer for yourself involves both reflection and advice from the professionals — a personal hearing needs assessment. Come hear Dr. Larry Medwetsky address this important topic.

Dr. Larry Medwetsky is Associate Professor and Chairman of the Hearing, Speech, and Language Sciences Department at Gallaudet University.  His specialties include spoken language processing, diagnostic assessment, hearing aid amplification, hearing assistive technology, educational audiology, and hearing loss prevention.

Date and Time: Sunday, May 22, 2016 at 2:00pm

Place: DC Public Library at Tenleytown (large meeting room), 4450 Wisconsin Ave NW, Washington, DC 20016 (less than a block from the Tenleytown Station on Metro’s Red Line)

Real-time captioning and a looping system will be available for all attendees.

All are welcome. There is no charge.

Prolong the Life of Your Hearing Aid Batteries – AARP

March 25, 2016 in Hearing Aids, Hearing Loss & Deafness, Technology

 

 

Some batteries may last two weeks, others just two or three days

How to keep your hearing aid batteries functional for longer. — Andras Csontos

There are few things more annoying than the unexpected beep in your ear that means your hearing aid battery is about to go dead. This is especially true if you don’t happen to have any spares.

Even in controlled studies, the life of a hearing aid battery has proven unpredictable. A 2013 report on wireless hearing aids in Audiology Online found that the real-life performance of most of the batteries tested deviated significantly from the standardized measurements reported by the manufacturers.

A battery for larger or non-wireless hearing aids may last two weeks, while another one for smaller or wireless hearing aids may last just two or three days. In some cases, the battery may be defective, but battery life also depends on the kind of hearing aid you have, how you use it, the kind of batteries you buy, and the assistive-listening devices you may use.

Read more . . .  Batteries

Other AARP Articles about Hearing Loss

Access to hearing aids could help fight dementia, says doctor

February 25, 2016 in Hearing Aids, Hearing Loss & Deafness, Technology

 

Physician Frank Lin says treating hearing loss could help fight cognitive decline as he estimates 36% of dementia risk linked to hearing impairment

The Guardian News 
Sunday 14 February 2016

Hearing loss contributes to dementia and mental decline, according to new medical research by a doctor who plans to begin the first clinical trial to study whether hearing aids could prevent or mitigate brain decline.

On Sunday physician Frank Lin described his research at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in Washington DC.

“I’m asking how can our peripheral functions, namely hearing, affect our central functions – our brain,” he asked. “Unfortunately this question is completely unknown. This trial has never been done.”

Lin said the prevalence of hearing loss doubles for every decade of life, and that its high frequency has led physicians to dismiss it too often. “The vast majority of dementias in late life are multifactorial,” he said, “but the role of hearing loss has just not been studied.”

Read more  . . . dementia

Hearing Aid Reviews – Real Consumer Feedback

February 11, 2016 in Hearing Aids

 


by  – Hearing Aids.

Searching for genuine consumer-generated hearing aid reviews online can be frustrating.  Just try Googling “hearing aid reviews” sometime – if you haven’t already. You’ll find a number of hearing aid “buying guides,” from the likes of AARP, Mayo Clinic, Consumer Affairs, and more. While we highly recommend familiarizing yourself with a reputable buying guide before purchasing hearing aids, we’re also disappointed with Google’s poor delivery. Where are the hearing aid reviews?

Before moving on to a thorough discussion of Hearing Tracker’s consumer reviews, we’d like to take a moment to further inspect Google’s top 10 results for “hearing aid reviews” (collected in January, 2016). The way we see it, the lack of relevant results is only part of the problem; only a handful of these links lead to independent, unbiased resources.

Read more  . . . Hearing Aid reviews