Education & Outreach - Archive

Pit bull saves deaf teen from house fire

July 31, 2014 in Families, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

‘Ace’ licked the face of sleeping teen to alert him to fire

A teen is alive thanks to the family’s pit bull, who woke him up from a nap when his house caught fire.

Nick Lamb, 13, who was born deaf, was home alone and sleeping without his hearing aids when the fire began, reports The Associated Press and WXIN. Indianapolis Fire Department Capt. Rita Reith says Lamb was unable to hear the smoke alarms going off.

Read more 

Reserve tickets for “NO Ordinary Hero: The SuperDeafy Movie”

July 29, 2014 in Community Events, Families

 

 

When a deaf actor who plays a superhero on television looks beyond his cape to influence a deaf boy to redefine what “being normal” means, he also finds inspiration to transform himself.

This event will only happen if 49 or more people reserved a ticket.
Reserve Tickets online: http://www.tugg.com/events/10142

NO Ordinary Hero: The SuperDeafy Movieno_ordinary_hero

At AMC Tysons Corner 16 on August 14

Director: Troy Kotsur
Starring: John Maucere, Michelle Nunes, Marlee Matlin, Ashley Fiolek, Peter Hulne, Zane Hencker
2014, 78 min.
Drama, Family

SUPERDEAFY must reveal the man behind the cape to find true love and inspire a young deaf boy to believe in himself. The movie follows the evolution of this unique hero. A beloved character and role model, SuperDeafy has a worldwide following. He has been turned into t-shirts, posters and dolls… and now a movie. This film marks the first time in cinematic history that a SAG commercial feature film is being executive produced exclusively by deaf executive producers and directed by a deaf director. The film will be 100% open captioned every screening.

Reserve Tickets online: http://www.tugg.com/events/10142

Learn more in ASL about movie, hosting and Tugg

Parent Educational Advocacy Training Center (PEATC) – May 6, 2014

April 29, 2014 in Community Events, Families

“Transition Planning Topics” Workshop, by Julie Triplett,

It’s never too early to start thinking about Transition Planning. Please join Parent Educational Advocacy Training Center (PEATC) as we welcome Julie Triplett of the Disability Law Center of Virginia for a workshop on this important topic!

 

Read More . . . 

Models/Peers for Total Communication Preschool – Fairfax County

March 11, 2014 in Community News, Families

Fairfax County Public Schools is looking for young applicants to be models/peers in our Total Communication preschool for next year.

We are looking for signing CODAs who also have age appropriate speech and language.  We are interested in 3 year old applicants but also specifically really  need a girl who is 4 – 4 ½ years old to be a peer / model for one of our students.

You must live in Fairfax County to apply.

If you are interested in applying, please contact Courtney Korb at cbkorb@fcps.edu for an application and further information.

Please spread the word.

Thank you,
Jan Pry
Preschool TC teacher

No. Virginia KODA group Halloween Party, Oct. 27th 1-3PM

October 25, 2013 in Community News, Families

1st Annual No.Va. KODA Halloween Party!
(KODA: Kids of Deaf Adults)

Sunday, October 27
1 pm to 3 pm
Burke Lake Park
Fairfax Station, Virginia

http://www.fairfaxcounty.gov/parks/burkelakepark/

($10 entrance fee for non-Fairfax County residents)
Deaf & Hearing Goblins of all ages are welcome!

Activities:

  • Games
  • Costume Show (adults, too!)
  • Treats for the kids (Please being a bag of treats to share)
  • Playground on premises
  • Burke Lake Park’s special annual Ghost Train (at your own expense, you can buy tickests fromt eh train depot for $4 per person)

$5.00 per family requested and greatly appreciated.  A professional quality family picture taken at the park will be included as part of the fee.  The money would go to cover the party expenses and to support future KODA activities in No. Virginia.

Please RSVP by 10/24 via Facebook or by email at NoVirginiaKODA@grmail.com for accurate head-count.  Thank you!

  

 

!st Annual No. BA KODA Halloween Party


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. You do not need permission to share this information, but please be sure to credit NVRC.  This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

Schools Sound Tour from NIDCD

September 18, 2013 in Families, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

schoolsound9_13School Sounds Tour

 

From National Institute for Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

Returning to school can be an exciting time for children as they reconnect with friends, meet their new teachers, and explore new subjects. As your children settle back into the school day routine, help them become aware of noise levels in their school environment.Talk with your children about noise levels at school and the importance of quiet spaces. Ask them to identify the noisiest and quietest spots they’ve noticed during their school day. Give them examples of places that might be loud (gym, crowded hallways, cafeteria) and quiet (classroom during reading time, art class, library).

With teacher and principal approval, your children can take a decibel meter to school to measure noisy and quiet spaces and share what they find with friends. Discuss the findings with your children and explain the dangers of prolonged or repeated exposure to any noise at or above 85 decibels. Sound meters can be purchased from an electronics store or through websites. Downloadable sound meter apps are also available for most smartphones.

For more information on teaching your tweens about noise levels, go to the Noisy Planet website to read Teachable Moments About Healthy Hearing, and take a look at our Interactive Sound Ruler. You can also post your children’s experiences on our Noisy Planet Facebook page.

 


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. You do not need permission to share this information, but please be sure to credit NVRC.  This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

Marvel Comics’ Hawkeye and the Blue Ear Help a Mother and Her Hearing Impaired Son

June 19, 2013 in Families, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

Published May 23rd 2012 By: Graeme McMillan

Marvel Comics’ Hawkeye is now teaming up with fellow hearing-impaired hero the Blue Ear to help boost one real life kid’s confidence and inspiring him to wear his hearing aid. Pretty good for an archer, right?

The kid in question is four-year-old New Hampshire resident Anthony Smith, who was refusing to wear his “blue ear” hearing aid because, he explained, superheroes don’t wear hearing aids. Desperate for help, Anthony’s mother Christina D’Allesandro wrote to Marvel, hoping to discover a superhero that proved him wrong – and that’s where the man with the bow, arrows and penchant for purple clothing comes in (Maya Lopez a.k.a. Echo is another hearing-impaired character in Marvel’s stable of heroes, although unlike Hawkeye, she is completely deaf and wouldn’t benefit from a hearing aid).

NVRC note: Unfortunately the video along with story is not captioned.

 
Read More: http://www.comicsalliance.com/2012/05/23/hawkeye-blue-ear-help-child-wear-hearing-aid/#ixzz2WfohRAX0

 


© Copyright 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. You do not need permission to share this information, but please be sure to credit NVRC.  This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

Gael Hannan: Advice from a Hard of Hearing Grandma

June 6, 2013 in Community News, Families

Advice from a Hard of Hearing Grandma
By Gael Hannan, Hearing Health Matters 6/4/2013

They say the best part of being a parent is becoming a grandparent. I’m sure that’s true for many people, but as a new grandma I’m still ironing out some of the kinks. (Note: Although my husband and I have only one 17-year-old child together, he is the father of four, one of whom made me an earlier-than-expected grandmother.They call me GG, for Grandma Gael, and we don’t use the ‘step’ word.)

Actually, there’s really only one kink: with my severe hearing loss, I have trouble understanding my three year-old grandson, Gage. I can understand his younger brother perfectly – but then, Owen is only eight months old. Held close enough, I can hear any sound  from any body part that Owen makes, and his facial expressions are pretty basic.

But Gage – a gorgeous, intelligent, and kinetic being – doesn’t stay still long enough for me to successfully speechread him. We live half a continent apart and don’t speak often enough for that  smooth ‘customization’ process to take place that allows a person with hearing loss to learn and adapt to another person’s speech. So every time Gage and I connect, whether in person or in a live chat through Facetime on iPad, I start the speechreading process over again – IF he sits still long enough.

I know it will eventually work out, just as it did with my own son. When I was expecting Joel, I was nervous about how my hearing loss would affect my child and our relationship. But, like any new mom, I learned on the job and he doesn’t (yet) appear to be traumatized by our communication challenges. In fact, he’s one of the best speakers and communicators I know.

For any new moms facing similar fears, here’s a Q&A of just a little of what I learned about communicating as a hard of hearing mother
.
Q:  Is my unborn baby making any sounds that I’m not hearing?

A:  I don’t think so, but of course I’m not the best person  to ask, am I? What I can say with certainty is that those 40 weeks were the most blessedly silent period of my life. When your baby is born, the noise will start, so enjoy the peace of pregnancy.

Q:  How will I hear my baby crying at night?

A:  The easiest method, although not necessarily the best, is to have a hearing partner. Don’t get me wrong; I’m not suggesting that baby-making-partners should be chosen for their ability to hear well, because there are many things more irksome in a spouse than hearing loss. (Inattentiveness and leaving the toilet seat up jump to mind.) But hearing spouses can be very useful in detecting a baby’s cry. They respond by lifting their head off the pillow to confirm that it’s the baby and not the cat, then they jab you in the ribs, saying, “Honey, baby’s crying…”

If you prefer to be awakened by a flashing light rather than a sharp elbow, use a baby monitor, an alerting system or a combination of the two to help you respond to your child. My daughter-in-law uses a video baby monitor, which I could have used years ago when my toddler decided to try climbing out of the crib by himself.  I walked in just in time to find him tottering lengthwise along the rail, flying like an airplane, both excited and terrified.

Q: I have trouble understanding other people’s children with their high voices. I’m nervous that I’ll have difficulty understanding my own child!

A: While I don’t want to trivialize or underestimate the communication challenges that you will most certainly have from time to time,this is your child and hearing loss will not prevent the two of you from connecting and communicating. You will always watch the face of your child for the information you can’t hear, and your baby will thrive on a parent who is focused and caring. Your daughter will learn how to get your attention. Your son will discover how to communicate what he needs or wants from you.   You will understand your child because you love your child and will do what it takes to keep communication flowing both ways.

Please reach out to your hearing local health organization or association such as HLAA or CHHA. I was six months pregnant when I connected with the Canadian Hard of Hearing Association and I received emotional support and practical advice that helped make me a better mom.

For two more good tips:
http://hearinghealthmatters.org/betterhearingconsumer/2013/advice-from-a-hard-of-hearing-grandma/


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. You do not need permission to share this information, but please be sure to credit NVRC.  This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

Adult CPR & First Aid Class in ASL – June 8th

May 30, 2013 in Community Events, Community News, Education & Outreach

Adult CPR and First Aid Class in ASL on June 8th!

Come and learn how to perform Adult CPR and First Aid entirely taught in ASL by a Red Cross certified instructor. The class will be held on June 8th from 9 am – 3 pm and lunch will be provided. The class will be held in Woodbridge at the Prince William County Government Complex in Woodbridge, VA.

The training is free to residents of Woodbridge, Dale City, Quantico, Dumfries Montclair, Manassas (20112 only) and Stafford (22554 and 22556 only). If you do not live in those areas the cost is $50, which includes lunch. Class size limited to 10 people. For more information email cw@pahdeaf.org.

Class is hosted by Providing Access to Healthcare for the Deaf Community (PAH) through a grant from the Potomac Health Foundation.

Find us on Facebook at: www.facebook.com/ProvidingAccessHealthCareDeaf


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. You do not need permission to share this information, but please be sure to credit NVRC.  This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

ESL Tutoring for Deaf Immigrants

May 6, 2013 in Community News, Education & Outreach

ESL Tutoring

(ESL = English as Second Language)

for Deaf Immigrants and

People Who Want to Improve

Their Reading/Writing Skills

Over 25 Years of Experience

in Tutoring

 

Certificate in Tutoring

from Gallaudet University

 

Contact Doreen Solar

VP 571-321-6654

DoreenSolar@sprint.blackberry.net


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. You do not need permission to share this information, but please be sure to credit NVRC.  This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.  To subscribe, unsubscribe, change your email address, or report problems, contact cheppner@nvrc.org


 

Additional ASL Interpreted Date for Magic Finger Just Added

April 30, 2013 in Community Events, Families

New Date Added for ASL Interpreted The Magic Finger at Imagination Stage

Due to popular demand, Imagination Stage has added a second ASL interpreted date for The Magic Finger at on Saturday, May 4th at 1:30 pm.  This story is based on the Roald Dahl book of the same name. 

Read more . . . →

RIT/NTID Summer Camp Application Deadline April 30th

April 9, 2013 in Community News, Families

RIT/NTID to Offer Educational Summer Camps for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students

Camps for deaf and hard-of-hearing teenagers are planned this summer at Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf, where they will get hands-on experience building computers or other high-tech devices, learn which college majors and careers may be best suited for them and meet other campers from around the country while enjoying recreational activities.

Explore Your Future, a six-day career awareness program for college-bound high school sophomores and juniors who are deaf or hard of hearing. Students experience college life, enjoy hands-on activities and get a taste of real world careers in the fields of art, business, computing, engineering, health sciences and science. Two sessions of the camp are being offered this year: July 13-18, or July 20-25, 2013. Deadline to apply is April 30.

 

Read more . . . 

 


© Copyright 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. You do not need permission to share this information, but please be sure to credit NVRC.  This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

LCPS, sordos o con deficiencias auditivas programa Presentación de servicios

April 5, 2013 in Community Events, Education & Outreach, Technology

Click here to read posting in english

Programa de Sordos y con Problemas Auditivos de “LCPS”

Dispositivos de Asistencia y Servicios de Programa Local para Personas Sordas y con Problemas Auditivos

Debbie Jones, Especialista en Tecnología y Recursos NVRC
Miércoles, 10 de Abril, 7 – 8:30 P.M.
Biblioteca de Ashburn — Cuarto A
43316 Hay Road, Ashburn, VA 20147
(703) 737-8100 

Debbie Jones

 

 

 

 

 

 

Debbie Jones ofrece entrenamiento en tecnología para individuos con pérdida de audición, al igual que entre- namiento para empresas, agencias y organizaciones quienes trabajan con personas sordas y con pérdida de audición. Debbie puede decirles sobre los servicios ofrecidos por el Centro de Recursos del Norte de Virgi- nia para Personas Sordas y con Pérdida de Audición, al igual que el equipo disponible del Programa de Asisten- cia en Tecnológica.

Una serie de diferentes tipos de dispositivos de asisten- cia disponibles para personas sordas y con problemas auditivos serán mostrados. Algunos ejemplos de dispo- sitivos de asistencia son despertadores vibrantes, siste- ma de alerta con luz parpadeante, sistemas de bucle, video-teléfono, teléfonos amplificados, teléfonos con subtítulos. Este es un evento informal, pasar en cual- quier momento entre las 7—8:30 PM para visitar a De- bbie y ver los artículos de muestra.

íEsperamos puedan pasar!

¡Todos son bienvenidos a asistir!

Para niños y adultos con pérdida de audición al igual que para sus amigos y familiares.

  • Demonstración de dispositivos
  • Ofreceremos numerosos folletos

  • Tendremos intérpretes de “ASL” y de español
  • No tendremos cuidado de niño. Los niños deberán de permanecer con sus padres/guardianes en todo momento..

Favor contactar a Eileen McCartin, Especialista de “D/HH” en eileen.mccartin@lcps.org o llamar a Renee Scott, ayudante del programa al (571) 252-1011 con cualquier pregunta que ten- ga o para solicitar acomodaciones.

 

No requerimos RSVP. íSolo vengan!

Click here to read posting in english

Mom’s Support Helps Language Development of Children with Hearing Loss

April 1, 2013 in Community News, Families, Research

 

Moms’ Sensitivity Helps Language Development in Children with Hearing Loss


From University of Miami 3/26/2013
www.miami.edu 

Children with cochlear implants who receive positive and emotional support from their mothers develop language skills at a faster rate, almost “catching up” to children with normal hearing, according to a study by a University of Miami psychologist.

“I was surprised that maternal sensitivity had such strong and consistent effects on oral language learning,” said Alexandra L. Quittner, lead investigator of the study and director of the Child Division in the Department of Psychology in UM’s College of Arts and Sciences. The results of study, one of the largest and most representative on the effects of parenting on young deaf children who wear cochlear implants, are published in the Journal of Pediatrics.

“The findings indicate that pediatric cochlear implant programs should offer parent training that facilitates a more positive parent-child relationship and fosters the child’s development of autonomy and positive regard,” Quittner said.

Her study investigated the role of parental behavior in language growth for deaf children. Maternal sensitivity was measured in videotaped interactions with the child and defined as the degree to which a mother expressed positive regard and emotional support of the child.

The study included 188 children, ages five months to 5 years of age, with severe to profound hearing loss. In addition to analyzing the effects of maternal sensitivity on language development, the study also looks at the impact of cognitive and language stimulation. Parent-child interactions observed and coded included free play, puzzle solving, and an art gallery task with five posters mounted at different heights on the walls of the playroom.

The largest improvements in language development were observed in children whose parents displayed high sensitivity; Language stimulation was also an important predictor of language gains but was most effective when delivered in a sensitive manner. Deaf children with sensitive parents had only a 1 year delay in oral language compared to. 2.5 years among those with less sensitive parents.

Read the rest of the story at: http://www.miami.edu/index.php/news/releases/moms_sensitivity_helps_language_development_in_children_with_hearing_loss/


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

Apply for Partners in Policymaking

March 29, 2013 in Community News, Education & Outreach, Families

Partners in Policymaking Accepting Applications

Do you have a developmental disability?  Are you the parent of a young child with a developmental disability?  If you are, or know someone who is, apply for a free training program called Partners in Policymaking.

Topics covered in the sessions include independent living, assistive technology, supported employment, and history of the disability rights movement. Participants practice presenting testimony and learn how to impact the legislative process.

Thirty people across the state will be chosen for this program, which begins in September 2013 and concludes in May 2014. During this period, participants attend eight two-day sessions, from Friday afternoon and to late Saturday afternoon, in Richmond, Virginia. Lodging, meals, training, and transportation (plus individual accommodations such as personal care attendants and interpreters) are paid for by the program.

Apply by April 30. If you have questions, please contact Rachel Loria at 800-846-4464 or Rachel.Loria@vbpd.virginia.gov.

Thanks to Fairfax Area Disability Services


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.