Emergency Preparedness - Archive

Canada Gets Text to 9-1-1 Service

March 24, 2014 in Emergency Preparedness

Specialized 9-1-1 text service now available

E-COMM

 

MARCH 23, 2014

E-Comm, the 9-1-1 answer point serving Metro Vancouver, Sunshine Coast and other parts of southwest B.C. has launched Canada’s first Text with 9-1-1 (T9-1-1) service for members of the deaf, hard-of-hearing and speech impaired (DHHSI) community, in conjunction with its emergency-service partners.

The specialized text messaging system means any DHHSI person in E-Comm’s service area who has pre-registered their cell phone for the service will be able to communicate with police, fire and ambulance call-takers in case of emergency. Read more . . . →

More Hot News About Text to 911

February 4, 2014 in Community News, Emergency Preparedness

Hot News About Text to 911

From FCC Access Services

On January 30, 2014, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) adopted a policy statement setting forth goals for achieving text-to-911 and a Further Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (FNPRM).   The policy statement highlighted the nation’s four largest wireless telephone providers’ commitment to make text-to-911 available to all their customers nationwide by May 15, 2014.  The FCC encourages other text providers to offer text-to-911 as well and asks for comment on proposals to meet the goals of (1) making sure that people with disabilities have direct access to 911 services and (2) enabling people in situations from which it might be impossible or dangerous to make a voice call (i.e., hostage situation, domestic violence) to make text-to-911 calls.  In his statement at the FCC’s Open Commission Meeting, Chairman Tom Wheeler said it is now up to the 911 call centers, known as Public Safety Answering Points (PSAPs), to make themselves ready to accept these texts. 

Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) Training Seminar

January 30, 2014 in Emergency Preparedness

DHHIG e-mail and news of the day!

Community Emergency Response Team
(CERT) Training Seminar

A free two-day Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) Training Seminar for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Community will be provided at Gallaudet University.  The training seminar will take place on March 5 – 6, 2014 from 8:30 AM to 4:30 PM.  This event is sponsored and hosted by the CERT, the DC government, Gallaudet University, and Deaf and Hard of Hearing in Government (DHHIG). To view the flyer for more information, please click here.Please note that Deaf and Hard of Hearing Individuals who live or work in Washington, D.C. are eligible to attend.  If you do not meet one of the two criteria, then you are not able to participate in this training seminar.  Furthermore, if you register to attend, you are expected to show up to both days of the CERT training seminar, not just one.

The deadline to register is February 7, 2014.  The training seminar will be limited to 60 people, so registration will be on first-come, first-serve basis. All participants who complete the two-day training will receive free backpacks!

To register, please click here.

**ASL interpreters will be provided at the CERT training seminar.  Additional accommodations can be provided upon request.

Sincerely,
DHHIG Board
2011-2013

Copyright © 2012 {Deaf & Hard-of-Hearing in Government (DHHIG)}. All rights reserved.
Contact email: {info@dhhig.org}
You are receiving this message because you opted in atwww.dhhig.org

FEMA’s Office of Disability Integration and Coordination is Hiring!

January 24, 2014 in Emergency Preparedness, Employment

U.S. Department of Homeland Security

Federal Emergency Management Agency

Position Opening: Program Assistant

FEMA’s Office of Disability Integration and Coordination headquarters staff is expanding and has an open vacancy for the position of Program Assistant (GS-0344-06). As the national Disability Integration Advisor CADRE reservist program grows, the need for additional administrative support is necessary.

This person will help serve the nation by assisting all citizens and first responders during disasters or emergency situations by being a part of FEMA’s disaster workforce.  This position is held at FEMA Headquarters in the Washington, DC area. Please feel free to forward this notification to anyone who may be interested in applying for this exciting opportunity to join FEMA and help integrate and coordinate national disability inclusive emergency management efforts.  Please follow the link below to the vacancy announcement onUSAJOBS.GOV.

FEMA – Program Assistant (Open to United States Citizens) - https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/359853700

FEMA Accepting Youth Preparedness Council Applications

January 22, 2014 in Community News, Emergency Preparedness

FEMA Accepting Youth Preparedness Council Applications

The application period for FEMA’s Youth Preparedness Council is now open!

Know someone between the ages of 12 and 17 who is engaged in individual and community preparedness or who has experienced a disaster that has motivated him or her to make a positive difference in his or her community? If so, encourage them to apply to serve on FEMA’s Youth Preparedness Council!

FEMA’s Youth Preparedness Council (YPC) is a unique opportunity for youth leaders to serve on a highly distinguished national council and to participate in the Youth Preparedness Council Summit. Additionally, they  complete self-selected youth preparedness projects;  voice their opinions, experiences, ideas, solutions and questions on youth disaster preparedness with the leadership of FEMA and national organizations working on youth preparedness.

FEMA is looking for youth leaders who are dedicated to public service, who are making a difference in their communities and who want to expand their impact as ambassadors for youth disaster preparedness.

For more information and application materials for the YPC please visit, http://www.ready.gov/youth-preparedness-council.Applications must be received by February 24, 2014, 11:59 p.m. EST.

New Youth Preparedness Council members will be announced in May 2014

Claude Stout Speaks to Senate Committee on Wireless 911 Calls

January 16, 2014 in Emergency Preparedness, NVRC Announcements

Claude Stout Presents at U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science & Transportation

 TDI’s Executive Director Claude Stout Presents at Senate Committee Hearing

By Cheryl Heppner 1/16/2014

Claude Stout, the Executive Director of Telecommunications for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, spoke today at a meeting of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation in its Communications

Claude Stout, the Executive Director of Telecommunications for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, spoke on Thursday – 1/16/2014

Claude Stout, the Executive Director of Telecommunications for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, spoke today at a meeting of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation in its Communications, Technology and Internet Subcommitee hearing regarding “Locating 911 Callers in a Wireless World.” Web Media Specialist Bruce Greenfield, Outreach Program Manager Bonnie O’Leary and Board member Tom Dowling joined me to watch it on one of NVRC’s flat screen televisions. Unfortunately the captions did not begin until approximately five minutes after the meeting started.

Mr. Stout, who had been invited to give testimony regarding location identification technology, was the second individual to
speak. He focused on the exciting possibilities that could be gained through these new and emerging technologies and praised the FCC, PACO,

Senate Committee on Commerce, Science,

Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation in its Communications, Technology and Internet Subcommitee hearing regarding “Locating 911 Callers in a Wireless World.”

NENA, CTIA and the four wireless carriers for listening to consumer demands and collaboratively implementing new accessible solutions in emergency services. Mr. Stout also talked about technology used by individuals with hearing loss or deafness to communicate by telephone and the crucial need that location-finding technology plays in an emergency. He stressed that consumers with hearing loss or deafness need to be able to describe their emergency situation and information without losing time in trying to provide information on their location.

Mr. Stout’s closing words were: “We simply want the same capabilities like anyone else to initiate and participate fully in communications with emergency services. Like our family members and friends who can hear, we do pay local property taxes and federal taxes that support our local public safety services, and also pay subscriber fees to access the telephone networks as a conduit to emergency services. As 911 centers continue to rely on funding from these sources, so should we rely on them to be fully accessible to every single one of us in the communities across America.”

See short video clip on NVRC Website.

Watch Entire Hearings Archive  (NOTE – Open Captions are not ON until 7 to 10 Minutes into hearing)

Take the Wireless Emergency Alert Survey

November 12, 2013 in Community News, Emergency Preparedness

 

 

Take the Wireless Emergency Alert Survey!
Thanks to the Mid-Atlantic ADA Center 11/12/2013
Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA) can be received on cell phones across the country. These alerts are automatic, provide AMBER alerts, and weather emergency notifications. Unlike text alerts you may receive from your city, county, or institution, you do not have to sign-up to receive WEA messages. The Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center for Wireless Technologies (Wireless RERC) is interested in your level of awareness of WEA messages. This survey will also help them understand how accessible and useful you think they are.
Take the Wireless Emergency Alert Survey
As an incentive for taking the 2013 WEA survey, participants will have a chance to win one of two $100 Amazon gift cards.
If participants wish to take the survey over the phone, please email DeeDee Bennett at deedee.bennett@cacp.gatech.edu or call her at 404-385-4618.

 


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. You do not need permission to share this information, but please be sure to credit NVRC.  This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

Be Prepared! 10 Things You Need to Know About Emergency Preparedness

September 17, 2013 in Emergency Preparedness

Disability Connection: 10 Things You Need to Know about Emergency Preparednessemergency

From Disability.gov

1. September is National Preparedness Month. Disasters can strike quickly and without warning making every second count during an emergency. Since 2004, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has sponsored National Preparedness Month, which encourages Americans to take simple steps to prepare for emergencies in their homes, businesses, schools and communities. The site’s toolkit includes helpful information, such as how to build an emergency supply kit, making a family game plan, staying informed before, during and after an emergency, and other preparedness resources and tips. Be ready and be safe! Find preparedness events in your community.

2. Tornadoes. During a tornado, finding shelter quickly is paramount to staying safe. An underground area, such as a basement or storm cellar, provides the best protection from a tornado. Staying in your trailer or mobile home, even if it is tied down, is not safe. If an underground shelter is unavailable, the following tips should be considered: Read more . . . →

Fire Safety a Priority in Your Home

August 27, 2013 in Community News, Emergency Preparedness

Making Fire Safety a Priority in Your Home 

Nearly 2,500 people die in home fires each year. Eighty-two percent of all fire deaths and 76 percent of all fire injuries in our country occur in the home – the very place we should feel most safe.

It is important to protect yourself and your loved ones by installing smoke alarms on every level of your home, including inside and outside sleeping areas. Traditional smoke alarms, however, do not always meet the needs of people with disabilities.

If you are deaf or hard-of-hearing, you may not respond to the traditional smoke alarm alert. This is because most hearing loss begins with high frequencies, the same frequencies that smoke alarms use. You may use hearing aids during the day, but when you remove them at night, you may be unable to hear the smoke alarm alert.

Read More about Home Fire Safety Tips

Thanks to Fairfax County Disability Services


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. You do not need permission to share this information, but please be sure to credit NVRC.  This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

Fairfax County Offers 3 CERT Classes This Fall

August 9, 2013 in Community Events, Emergency Preparedness

Fairfax County Offers Three CERT Classes Offered This Fallcertlogo

When emergencies happen, Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) members can give critical support to first responders, provide immediate assistance to victims, and organize spontaneous volunteers at a disaster site. CERT members can also help with non-emergency projects that help improve the preparedness and safety of the community.Fairfax County is offering three CERT basic training classes this fall.

Read more . . . →

Fall Classes for Fairfax Co. CERT Training

July 30, 2013 in Community Events, Emergency Preparedness

certlogoFall Classes for Fairfax County Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) Training

The Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) Program educates people about disaster preparedness for hazards that may impact their area and trains them in basic disaster response skills, such as fire safety, light search and rescue, team organization, and disaster medical operations. Using the training learned in the classroom CERT members can assist others in their neighborhood or workplace following an event when professional responders are not immediately available to help.

Fairfax County is offering three CERT Basic training classes in the FALL. Two identical classes will be conducted at the Fairfax County Fire and Rescue Academy (4600 West Ox Road). The first class is held on Mondays, beginning  Sept 9th, and the second on Wednesdays, beginning  Sept 11th.  Each class will have eight (8) sessions, 7:00 pm to 10:00 pm. There is a good mix classroom instruction with practice drills and exercises to enhance skill learning. These class utilizing the fire academy training facilities and instructors.

A third CERT class will be conducted in the community at the Great Springfield Volunteer Fire Station 22 (7011 Backlick Road) beginning on Wednesday Sept 11th. This class has eight (8) sessions, 7:00pm to 9:30 pm.  The classroom instruction is the same as the Academy classes, but the class size and hands-on instruction is limited by the available facilities.

CERT Basic training does not require any special physical strength or agility. Safety and preparedness is stressed throughout the course of instruction. This training is FREE. The CERT program furnishes personal protective equipment for the training that the students retain upon completion of the class.

People who go through CERT training have a better understanding of the potential threats to their home, workplace and community and can take the right steps to lessen the effects of these hazards on themselves, their homes or workplace.

When emergencies happen, CERT members can give critical support to first responders, provide immediate assistance to victims, and organize spontaneous volunteers at a disaster site. CERT members can also help with non-emergency projects that help improve the preparedness and safety of the community.

You can enroll in any of these three classes by going to the Fairfax County CERT website: www.fairfaxcountyCERT.com. Register as a new volunteer and when confirmed you can login and register for CERT class 73, 74 or 75.

For further information contact the Fairfax County Fire and Rescue Volunteer Coordinator’s Office, 703-246-3926.


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. You do not need permission to share this information, but please be sure to credit NVRC.  This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

FEMA Seeks Disability Integration Advisors

June 28, 2013 in Community News, Emergency Preparedness

U.S. Department of Homeland Security
 Federal Emergency Management Agency

FEMA

 

 

 

Dear Colleagues;

Marcie Roth, Director of FEMA’s Office of Disability Integration and Coordination, is excited to inform you of the employment opportunity with FEMA’s Incident Management CORE Program.  Several Emergency Management Specialist (Disability Integration Advisors - AD-0089-11) will be hired throughout the United States.  As a part of FEMA’s disaster workforce, CORE Reservists serve the nation by assisting all citizens and first responders during disasters or emergency situations.  As a CORE Disability Integration Advisor Reservist you will train, gain experience, and become qualified in this specific disaster role.  This position allows you to assist in the coordination and integration of persons with disabilities in the response and recovery efforts of impacted citizens, communities, Local, Tribal, and State governments. This announcement is open from June 26, 2013 until July 2, 2013 at 11:59pm EST.  Please feel free to forward this notification to anyone who may be interested in applying for this exciting opportunity to join FEMA and help integrate and coordinate national disability inclusive emergency management efforts.   Please follow the link below to the vacancy announcement on USAJOBS.GOV.

Emergency Management Specialist (Disability Integration Advisors - AD-0089-11) - Job Announcement Number: FEMA-MJ007-IM/COR-13

https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/346465800


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. You do not need permission to share this information, but please be sure to credit NVRC.  This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

Text to 911: We can’t afford to wait

June 17, 2013 in Emergency Preparedness

Jun. 17, 2013
http://urgentcomm.com/blog/text-911-we-cant-afford-wait-0

By Toni Dunne, Intrado

We joke about “the old days,” when people used tin cans and smoke signals to communicate. We tout how far we have come with technology. We’ve advanced through great technological challenges, such as the move from rotary phones to digital, and from hard-wired handsets to wireless. With each challenge met, we pat ourselves on the back for keeping up with the times.  But have we?

The reality is that there’s a group of people—the deaf and hearing-impaired—who haven’t been able to move forward with the rest of us when it comes to calling 911 during an emergency. Many have rid themselves of old TTYs (also known as TDDs – Telecommunication Devices for the Deaf) in favor of new wireless devices for their personal use. But during an emergency, they are being held hostage to communicate in text via this old technology, which first debuted in 1874 and equipment modified from a teletype machine in 1964.

From 1968, when the first 911 call was made, and for more than 30 years, most agencies did not even have a TTY to provide access for these citizens. It was not until the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) was signed into law in 1990 and the U.S. Department of Justice mandated all that “telephone emergency communications, including 911, shall provide direct access to people who use TDDs” that we saw equal access with equipment added in the communications centers. Ironically, it seems we have taken one step forward and two steps back.

Deaf friends have told me stories. Richard thought he was having a heart attack and couldn’t text to 911 for help. Instead, he had to get his friend to drive him to the hospital. My girlfriend’s son injured his head, and there was no way to summon help. As a mother, I can only imagine the fear and frustration that she went through during those moments. I’ve heard of other situations, such as when actress Marlee Matlin had to rely on her 4-year-old daughter to interpret, because she could not use her cell phone to text to 911.

With more than 38 million individuals who are deaf, deaf-blind or hard of hearing, and with more than 7.5 million individuals with speech disabilities that rely on text for communications, one can only imagine how many more stories are out there. How many have not ended well because of current barriers?

But it doesn’t have to be this way. We have the technology and capability to do something now—the technology and solutions exist today. We can move forward in a safe, reliable, and expeditious manner.

Implementing text to 911 should not be an option. Let’s not allow our friends and family who happen to be deaf to be left in the lurch again. We can’t afford to wait—this literally is a matter of life and death.

Toni D. Dunne is the external affairs manager at Intrado and has more than 20 years experience working within the public-safety industry. Her prior experience includes work as a PSAP relations specialist and a trainer. Throughout her career, Dunne has been a staunch advocate for equal access to emergency services for individuals who are deaf, deaf-blind, hard of hearing, and/or speech impaired. She has been honored with several national awards, including the NENA President’s Award and the Robert H. Weitbrecht Telecommunications Access Award.

 


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. You do not need permission to share this information, but please be sure to credit NVRC.  This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

Deaf, Hard of Hearing “Victims” Needed for Fairfax Co. CERT Exercise on June 30

June 4, 2013 in Community News, Emergency Preparedness

CERT CON Exercise
LORTON PRISON
June 30, 2013 – Call for Victim Volunteers 

NVRC Note: CERT has requested individuals who are deaf or have a hearing loss to participate as victims in this exercise so they can learn more about how best to help them in emergencies. Your participation will give CERT members more experience with the unique communication needs we have. You will also learn more about how to prepare for a real disaster, how to support our emergency responders.

Interested “victims” should RSVP to Kevin Mullins at actors@fairfaxcountycert.org

Sign language interpreters will be provided for the briefing and will be on hand throughout the exercise as needs arise. They will also be provided for debriefing at the end of the exercise.

The Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) is a system of training citizens to respond to large scale emergencies within their own neighborhood when the resources of the Fairfax County Fire and Rescue system have been overwhelmed. These citizens are trained in the absence of a fire department response to mobilize and organize a rescue team for their community. CERT CON is a regional convention of CERT members gathered to train, refresh and learn new skills. CERT teams from Virginia, DC, Maryland Delaware and other areas will be attending.

We are in need of people to play the role of “victims” for this drill. As a victim you will be expected to play your role as realistically as possible.  You will receive “make-up” to show “wounds” and will have fake blood placed on your clothes. As such, please dress for the elements (we have the drill rain or shine) as you will be waiting outside to be found, in clothes that you can get very dirty, stained, and possibly even torn. You must wear long pants and closed end shoes, due to the location, we cannot make exceptions to this rule. Some of you may also be called upon to assist the rescuers in performing their duties. You may participate in any way you feel comfortable.

This is a very exciting opportunity to help your community. Live “victims” are essential to providing high quality training, and you’ll learn quite a bit too! We’ll even throw in lunch afterwards.

You need to arrive at the Lorton Prison Complex, Youth Facility, 9845 Furnace Road Lorton VA 22079 (also known as Landfill Drive) by 7:00 am. We’ll have signs posted on the roads to direct you too. The drill should be completed by no later than 1pm. We’ll need you to participate for the entire time. However, if you need to leave early due to an emergency, just let a facilitator know so we can account for you. Due to limited parking, it is requested that you carpool as much as possible. You can use Google Map coordinates: 38.688709, -77.240732.

The schedule for the date usually goes something like this:

7:00 am (sharp) - Arrive and park. Check in. You’ll be registered and your contact information taken. You’ll be given a card with a set of “injuries” you are to act out. You’ll start in the makeup process. While this doesn’t take much time, there is a wait to get through. The lead instructor will give you a brief presentation on safety issues, what to expect, and what CERT is all about! This is a great time to sign up for a class!

7:30am – 8:30am - You’ll be escorted to the area that you’ll be “trapped” or laying.

9:00pm - The Drill begins. The rescuers will search, sort the victims by severity, extricate those that are trapped, and transport all victims to a treatment area.

NOON – Lunch, debrief, “thank-you” from the students and Victim checkout.

Adults are preferred, but CERT will gladly accept minors 15 years and older with signed parental consent (attached) with a full understanding of what’s involved.    At checkout, those that would like them can receive a certificate signifying 6.5 hours of community service provided. Please give your name, phone number and E-mail address to the person who provided you with this request. Bring the attached form to the exercise.

REQUIREMENTS:  You must wear long pants and closed end shoes—no exceptions here! Also bring a water bottle for the exercise and a folding chair for lunch (put your name on your chair). Bring iPods, phones or any electrics may get wet or damaged so if you bring them be prepared to protect them.  Also wear sunscreen and bug repellent is recommended. 


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. You do not need permission to share this information, but please be sure to credit NVRC.  This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

FCC Requires “Bounce-Back Messages” when Texting to 911 is Unavailable

May 20, 2013 in Community News, Emergency Preparedness, Technology

Wireless Carriers and Providers of Interconnected Text Messaging Must Send “Bounce-Back” Messages to Consumers Who Text 911 Where the Service is Not Offered

On May 17, 2013, the FCC released a Report and Order requiring a “bounce back” message to consumers who try to text 911 where text-to-911 is not available. The FCC’s requirement will help protect the public by informing consumers who try to text 911 whether or not the 911 authorities received the text message.  If the message has not been received, consumers will receive an immediate response that text-to-911 is not available and to contact emergency services by another means, such as by making a voice call or using telecommunications relay services (if deaf, hard of hearing, or speech disabled) to access 911.  This FCC action implements in part recommendations from the Emergency Access Advisory Committee (EAAC), which the Commission established under the Communications and Video Accessibility Act of 2010.

Read more . . . →