Captioning / Relay - Archive

No(ah), No(ah) – It’s Too Loud, By Gael Hannan

April 10, 2014 in Captioning / Relay, Hearing Loss & Deafness

By Gael Hannan, Hearing Health Matters 4/8/2014

In hindsight, we should have picked the movie about the spelling bee over the cute animals marching two by two into Russell Crowe’s ark.

noah

 

I mean, how loud can a spelling bee be, whereas Noah turned out to be a surprise candidate for the Loudest Movie I’ve Ever Seen award.  But who knew?  The


Spoiler Alert:  
Noah is too loud with non-stop visual effects.other choices for a movie night with the Hearing Husband and my hearing friend Wendy were action/thriller films that we figured would be too loud with non-stop and over-the-top visual effects.

While it’s not a religious movie, there are angels in the form of gigantic stone-lava transformers.  And there are hordes of screaming people who can’t swim and don’t have tickets for the ark.  When le déluge starts, the water comes not only from the sky, but from mighty geysers roaring up from the earth, hundreds of feet in the air, presumably as part of the Creator’s plan to get that boat afloat as quickly as possible.  And all of these noise sources happen at the same time, creating a mega-decibel cacophony that almost melted my hearing aids.

I wish I had been able to turn on the Decibel Meter app on my cellphone to measure the volume.  But I didn’t have any free fingers.  I had taken out one of my in-the-ear hearing aids because it was magnifying the already loud noise (when is compression supposed to kick in?) in a sensory onslaught that made my head vibrate and my eyeballs ache.

My other hand was helping to balance my popcorn and drink, because the drink holder contained my CaptiViewcaption thingy.  (I’ve complained about this before; if my caption device is in the drink holder, I have to hold the huge drink in my lap.  A shout out to movie chains – get the Sony Caption Glasses system.  It places the captions where you want them and leaves your hands free for food, drink and hearing aids.)  . . .

Read More . . . . 

http://hearinghealthmatters.org/betterhearingconsumer/2014/noah-noah-loud/

Disability.gov Update: New FCC Rules to Improve Quality of TV Closed Captioning

February 25, 2014 in Captioning / Relay

disability-gov-email-bulletin-header_original

New FCC Rules to Improve Quality of TV Closed CaptioningThe Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has approved new rules for TV closed captioning that will ensure that people who are deaf or hard of hearing have full access to television programming. The new rules state that all television programming with closed captions must accurately convey dialogue and sounds in the program. Captions must also be timed so that they do not lag behind the program’s dialogue and must not block important information on the screen.

Having trouble viewing this email? View it as a Web page.


 

 

 

Advocacy Alert! Please Come to the FCC on Thursday, February 20

February 18, 2014 in Advocacy & Access, Captioning / Relay, Community Events

Advocacy Alert!

Please Come to the Federal Communications Commission on Thursday, February 20

Hi consumer advocates, professionals in deafness and hearing loss, and friends in the metro D.C. area,

This Thursday will be a SPECIAL day for us at the Federal Communications Commission (FCC).

The FCC will produce some action this Thursday with a Report and Order, a Declaratory Order, and a Further Notice of Proposed Rulemaking on TV caption quality issues.  The FCC takes action in response to our two petitions, one in 2004 for caption quality, and another in 2010 for 24-hour captioning, a mandate for captioned advertisements, and real-time captioning of local news, weather, and sports shows.  The two petitions were filed jointly with the Commission by TDI and its sister consumer groups – NAD, ALDA, HLAA, DHHCAN, and AADB.

Can I ask you to do America a big SPECIAL favor?

Please come to the open Commission meeting this Thursday (February 20)  It will start at 10:30 a.m. and finish at about 12:00 p.m.  The Commission’s headquarters is on 445 12th Street, SW, Washington, D.C. 20554.  If you come by car, there is a parking garage behind the Commission building.  The parking rate is rather steep, around $19 per day. There are other places to park, a good block or two away from the FCC, you can pay ten dollars for a place at an open parking area, or use the meter, two hours is the usual maximum.  If you come on Metro, get off from the Smithsonian station which is on the Blue/Orange line.  Be sure to arrive at the Commission building a good thirty to forty five minutes before 10:30 a.m. This is because you will need to go through security, first to get a visitor’s badge, and then go through the security gates.  The open Commission meeting is on the first floor, and you need not go look for an elevator.

When I send you a request for your personal help and involvement, I do it when we know it is going to be worth your time and effort, and the results it will bring to the rest of our fellow deaf and hard of hearing citizens in America!

If you come to join us this Thursday at the FCC, it will make a tremendous impression on the new Chairman of FCC, Mr. Tom Wheeler, and his fellow four Commissioners – Ms. Mignon Clyburn, Ms. Jessica Rosenworcel, Mr. Ajit Pai, and Mr. Michael O’Rielly.  Equally important, we give our deepest thanks and “pats on the back” to Ms. Karen Peltz Strauss, Mr. Greg Hlibok, and Mr. Eliot Greenwald with the Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau at the FCC.  They have worked hard with the five-member Commission to make this initiative possible.  The FCC is making a big step forward for our two petitions.  They have heard you loud and clear, after so many years.

The historical, pivotal action FCC takes this Thursday will create much improvement in captions for our daily television viewing experience.  Details are not final but a few examples are as follows:

1.)  the Commission is giving local TV stations with news, weather, and sports shows a year’s time to substantially improve captioning of these shows via the electronic newsroom technique (ENT).

2.)  While local TV stations improve their offering of captions via ENT for their news shows, FCC asks around for more information as to whether the TV stations should continue providing captions via ENT or in real-time captions.

3.) The Commission will make clear that it expects higher quality captions for off-line (pre-recorded) programming, and as reasonable as possible for live programming.

4.)  The Commission will ask in an upcoming proceeding on whether it should require captioning of all advertisements that are shown on TV, as well as programs having captions 24 hours a day.  Right now, as you know, advertisements are not required to be captioned, and programs that are aired between two a.m. to six a.m. are usually not captioned.

5.) Commission will coordinate more closely with industry on complaints that we file with them for erroneous captioning. This time, there will be enforcement action on the Commission’s part, only when there is a recurring violation of any one programmer’s responsibility to caption its program.

6.)  As equally important, the Commission will signal that it intends to review progress in captioning regularly from the industry, and that it comes up with follow up action when there is lack of improvement over a reasonable amount of time with any one area of captioning.

My dear friends, will you sincerely heed my call for participation?  If you are working, try asking your boss to excuse you a couple of hours, and join us in the historic Commission meeting. If you are retired, here is an opportunity for you to do something different!  If you can come to join us in this event, we would be deeply grateful, and I know Karen and Greg will feel the same, too.

Again, the FCC event is at 10:30 a.m. this Thursday, February 20 on 445 12th Street, SW, Washington, D.C.  Come by car or on Metro.  Let the FCC see a good crowd from the deaf and hard of hearing community.  The TV industry will realize we do make an important part of the market.  Come and let us show others what we are made of!

Thanks for giving my request for your participation your full consideration.  All the help you can give, we would deeply appreciate it.  You are most welcome to distribute this info. to your other contacts.  Let us come in droves and droves.  We can make an impressive turnout better than a group of Canadian geese flying in a “V” formation!

See you this Thursday at the FCC!

Best,

Claude Stout
Executive Director
Telecommunications for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, Inc. (TDI)
cstout@tdiforaccess.org

 

 

CORRECTION ON DAY of IP Based Relay Technologies Workshop: Tuesday, Feb 18, 2014

February 3, 2014 in Captioning / Relay

Please correct your calendars!
The notice below erroneously indicated that February 18th is a Wednesday.  Actually, it is a Tuesday.  We hope to see you there!

The Federal Communications Commission’s (FCC’s) Consumer and Governmental Affairs issued a Public Notice announcing a workshop on research initiatives on IP-based relay technologies.  The workshop will be held at the FCC’s headquarters, located at 445 12th Street, SW, Washington, DC 20554 on Wednesday, February 18, 2014 from 9:30 to 12:30.    The FCC and the National Institute on Aging will host the workshop, which is the first in a series of workshops to gather and incorporate stakeholder input on the types of research that are needed to improve the functional equivalency and efficiency of TRS.

Links to the Public Notice:

PDF:  http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DA-14-117A1.pdf

Word:  http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DA-14-117A1.doc

Text:  http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DA-14-117A1.txt

Additional details will be released closer to the event date.

For further information, contact Roger Goldblatt, Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau,
at (202) 418-1035 (voice) or e-mail Roger.Goldblatt@fcc.gov.

CCAC -Collaborative for Communication Access via Captioning

November 24, 2013 in Captioning / Relay

COLLABORATIVE FOR COMMUNICATION ACCESS VIA CAPTIONING

MILLIONS with hearing loss,
1 IN 5 GLOBALLY, deserve equal rights with quality real time speech to text!

CCAC Logo

A non-profit organization for captioning inclusion and advocacy. Volunteer members educate and advocate locally, nationally, and internationally.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Become a CCAC member to share information, inspire others, and advocate together. Almost 50 million citizens in the USA alone deserve equal rights with real time speech to text.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Contact the CCAC at: CCACaptioning@gmail.com or http://CCACaptioning.org 

The Collaborative for Communication Access
via Captioning is a membership organization
of individuals from many backgrounds
who engage in, support, and work individually and together on advocacy projects to increase access and inclusion for all people through captioning. Established in December 2009, CCAC grew rapidly and became an official non-profit organization in 2012. CCAC manages an active online membership community to share captioning advocacy information from city, state, national and international projects, to create links to other non-profit organizational friends, and to build resources for public distribution. Captioning is missing in too many places it is needed everyday. Collaborations with other organizations are welcome. CCAC also offers a non-profit service online called CaptionMatch for anyone to ask for any sort of captioning needed, to expand advocacy efforts, and to find a provider who meets local needs.

 

Download – ccac_flyer 2013.pdf


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. You do not need permission to share this information, but please be sure to credit NVRC.  This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

Southwest Airlines to Start Wireless Inflight Entertainment in 2014

November 21, 2013 in Captioning / Relay, Community News, Transportation

Southwest Airlines to Offer Closed Captioning on Wireless Inflight Entertainment

Captioning to Begin in Early 2014

By Mary Kirby, Runway Girl Network 11/21/2013

Full article at http://bit.ly/1aU0DNm

NEWPORT BEACH: Southwest Airlines will be among the first carriers in the United States to introduce closed captioning to its wireless video entertainment product when the low-cost giant rolls out CC in early 2014.

The move will come as welcome news to the many deaf and hard of hearing (HoH) passengers who have been calling on airlines here and abroad to offer CC on in-seat and wireless IFE systems.

Airlines that have been slow to offer CC – together with content creators and suppliers – may feel further pressure to take action because Southwest is taking the lead on the wireless front. United Airlines in 2011 announced availability of CC on the live television systems installed on its Continental Airlines Boeing fleet.

“We’re working with Major League Baseball Advanced Media, which delivers our TV and video to the aircraft and they have to implement [CC] on their end. They’ll do all our video, both live and cached,” Southwest manager inflight product development Angela Vargo told Runway Girl Network today on the sidelines of the APEX Technology Committee conference in Newport Beach, California.

Read more . . . →

Gallaudet Football on the verge of first ever NCAA playoff berth (Captioned Video)

November 7, 2013 in Captioning / Relay, Community News

WASHINGTON (WUSA) – The beating of the drum is a practical tradition at Gallaudet University . It signals the start of footballpractice.Players who are deaf or hard of hearing can ‘feel’ the reverberations.

But there’s another sound echoing throughout campus.
The buzz is about the teams undefeated season, 8-0 with just two more games to play. Game number eight last weekend was an unbelievably dramatic win against Becker. The Bison blocked a field goal and returned it 79 yards for a touchdown.

Read more watch video  . . . . .

Open Captioned West Side Story at Chrysler Hall in Norfolk

November 4, 2013 in Captioning / Relay, Interpreting & Transliterating

West Side Story
@ Chrysler Hall

Accommodations for the Deaf & Hard of Hearing

Orchestra seats normally $85+ is discounted to $43!!!

 

Chris Jones of the Chicago Tribune calls this a “mostly successful revival.”

Come on out! Bring a friend! Tell a co-worker! Inform a neighbor! Spread the word!
Support Open Captioning at live theater by attending the FIRST Open Captioned show of Chrysler Hall’s 2013/2014 Broadway season.  Hope to see you there!

November 23, 2013 @ 2:00 pm
Open Captioning provided by Boyle Reporting & Captioning Services, LLC
If you like captioned movies and television programs, you can see Broadway shows with open captioning!!!
@ Chrysler Hall
215 St. Pauls Blvd
Norfolk, VA 23510
To purchase tickets call Gay Jones
757-664-6249
Website:www.sevenvenues.com

 

Upcoming Events

2013/2014 Lineup:

West Side Story,

Mamma Mia,

Adams Family,
Chicago
Million Dollar Quartet


 

What is Open Captioning? 

Open Captioning is a speech-to-text display to provide a simultaneous transcription of dialogue, lyrics and a description of environmental sounds for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing used at performing arts venues for scripted plays, displayed through an LED Board.

This service can be used by everyone for viewing in a reserved seating area.  Open captioning is considered a universal accommodation because it can be used by anyone regardless of hearing impairment, age or ability.

 


Follow us
on Twitter
Friend us
on Facebook
 Thank you for being a supporter of this movement to help everyone have the chance to enjoy the performing arts.  

From Boyle Reporting & Captioning Services

 


 

Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. You do not need permission to share this information, but please be sure to credit NVRC.  This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.  To subscribe, unsubscribe, change your email address, or report problems, contactcheppner@nvrc.org

Study Finds Captions Make Big Difference for All Students

October 14, 2013 in Captioning / Relay, Research

Video Captions Improve Comprehension

Science Daily, 10/11/2013

Thanks to Collaborative for Communication Access via Captioning

http://ccacaptioning.org/

A simple change — switching on captions — can make a big difference when students watch educational videos, an SF State professor has discovered.

Robert Keith Collins, an assistant professor of American Indian studies, found that students’ test scores and comprehension improved dramatically when captions were used while watching videos. The tool is often utilized for students with learning disabilities, but Collins says his results show captions can be beneficial to all students.

Collins developed the idea while he was a member of a faculty learning committee focused on ways to make the classroom more accessible to all students. During the first year of a two-year case study, he showed videos without captions to establish a baseline of student comprehension. Once that baseline was established, he turned captions on and began to see improvements. Those improvements continued into the second year of the study.

“Not only were students talking about how much having the captions helped them as they took notes, their test scores went up,” Collins said. “During the baseline year, there were a lot of Cs. In the second years, they went from Cs, Ds and Fs to As, Bs and Cs. It was really significant improvement.”

That improvement didn’t just manifest itself in grades. Class discussions also became livelier and more detailed, with students recalling specific information shown in the videos such as names of people and places.

“We’re living in an age where our students are so distracted by technology that they sometimes forget where they should focus their attention when engaged with technology or media,” he said. “Turning on captions seems to enable students to focus on specific information.”

The study was unique, Collins added, in that it explored captions’ impact broadly, as opposed to other studies that examined their effect solely on students with learning disabilities.
For the rest of the story: http://bit.ly/16ZzjSZ

 


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. You do not need permission to share this information, but please be sure to credit NVRC.  This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

Notice to Caution IP CTS Consumers About Possible Calling Scam

September 30, 2013 in Captioning / Relay, Community News

USERS OF IP CAPTIONED TELEPHONE SERVICES: 
NOTICE FROM THE FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION ABOUT POSSIBLE CALLING SCAM

The Federal Communications Commission has received information that consumers using Internet Protocol Captioned Telephone Relay Services (IP CTS) may have received calls from one or more persons purporting to be from the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), requesting the consumers to schedule a visit to the consumer’s home regarding the consumer’s IP CTS phone.

The purpose of this notice is to alert all IP CTS consumers that the FCC has not been scheduling any home visits to IP CTS consumers.  If you receive a phone call from any individual claiming to be from the FCC who wants to schedule a home visit, we recommend that you do not provide any information to the caller, and do not agree to let the caller into your home.  In addition, we request that you please report such calls to the FCC’s Disability Rights Office at 202-559-5158 (voice/videophone) or  Gregory.Hlibok@fcc.gov.


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. You do not need permission to share this information, but please be sure to credit NVRC.  This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

NAD Sues for Captioning of University of Maryland Sports Events

September 25, 2013 in Captioning / Relay, Disability Law, Uncategorized

 

NAD Sues for Captioning of Sport Events at University of Maryland

COLLEGE PARK, Md. (WJLA) – An association that advocates for the deaf and hard of hearing has sued the University of Maryland for not captioning public address announcements during on-campus sporting events.

The Silver Spring-based National Association of the Deaf (NAD), along with a Baltimore law firm, filed suit against the school Tuesday on behalf of Sean Markel and fellow Terrapin fan Joseph Innes.

The lawsuit claims that Maryland is violating Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act, and states that the school needs to write whatever is being said on the public address system on the scoreboards and jumbotrons at Byrd Stadium and at the Comcast Center.

When Maryland star receiver Stefon Diggs makes a great play, most fans hear the details on the public address system.

But hearing-impaired fans like Sean Markel don’t.

“Often, I’m left out — I don’t know what’s being announced,” he said.

NAD executives say that teams nationwide need to make sure they cater to the needs of the hearing impaired.

“All professional and collegiate sports teams need to recognize that many fans, not just those who are deaf or hard of hearing, need captioning in sports stadiums and arenas to understand what is being announced,” NAD CEO Howard Rosenblum said in a statement.

For more information: http://tinyurl.com/kastp35

 

Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. You do not need permission to share this information, but please be sure to credit NVRC.  This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

 

Looking for Captioned Movies in Theaters?

August 15, 2013 in Captioning / Relay, Community News

Looking for Captioned Movies in Theaters?

Feta Fernsler has shared these two links to watch captioned or subtitled trailers for: 

movies

 

 

 


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. You do not need permission to share this information, but please be sure to credit NVRC.  This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

Judges in California Reverse Ruling Preventing CART in Classrooms

August 7, 2013 in Captioning / Relay, Community News, Disability Law

By Tim Hull, Courthouse News Service 8/6/2013

Two California school districts must face claims that they improperly denied transcription services to deaf and hard-of-hearing students, the 9th Circuit ruled Tuesday.

In separate cases consolidated for appeal, the parents of K.M. And D.H., two hard-of-hearing high-school girls, argued that the districts had violated federal law by refusing to approve a transcription service in the classroom. The Communication Access Realtime Translation service provides a word-for-word transcription of everything said in class via real-time captioning, according to the ruling.

Read more . . . →

NAD Announces Apple Commitment to Captioning iTunes Movies, TV Shows

June 18, 2013 in Captioning / Relay, Community News

Apple Committed to Captioning of iTunes Movies and TV Shows
From the National Association of the Deaf, 6/1/2013

http://nad.org/news/2013/6/apple-committed-captioning-itunes-movies-and-tv-shows

For more than 20 years, Apple has been committed to accessibility across its products and services. Apple has led the industry in developing tools for networks and studios to easily deliver their content with top–quality closed captioning, which works seamlessly across various devices. Nearly all new movies and TV shows in iTunes already offer closed captioning, and by March 2014 the vast majority of the iTunes catalog will offer closed captioning. Apple is committed to working with the National Association of the Deaf (NAD) and the Disability Rights Education and Defense Fund (DREDF) to ensure that iTunes TV and movie offerings will contain closed captioning or subtitles, with every movie and TV episode in the iTunes catalog captioned or subtitled, by June 2015.

The NAD was established in 1880 by deaf leaders who believed in the right of the American deaf community to use sign language, to congregate on issues important to them, and to have its interests represented at thenational level. As a nonprofit federation, the mission of the NAD is to preserve, protect, and promote the civil, human, and linguistic rights of deaf and hard of hearing Americans.

Founded in 1979, by people with disabilities and parents of children with disabilities, the Disability Rights Education and Defense Fund(DREDF) is a national law and policy center, based in Berkeley, CA, dedicated to protecting and advancing the civil rights of people with disabilities.

Contacts:
Lizzie Sorkin, Director of Communications
lizzie (dot) sorkin (at) nad (dot) org or 301-830-5511

Ingrid Tischer, Director of Development
itischer (at) dredf (dot) org
 or 510-644-2555 ext.5241


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. You do not need permission to share this information, but please be sure to credit NVRC.  This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

Advocate for Captioning in Air Travel

June 13, 2013 in Captioning / Relay, Community News

CCAC_AirTravel

Advocate for

Captioning in

Air Travel

The Case For Captioning

The proven benefits of captioning should be available to all.

The Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”) mandates public accommodations must comply with basic nondiscrimination requirements that prohibit exclusion, segregation, and unequal treatment. Now is the time to require equality for Air Travel.

The Department of Transportation (USA) should require all commercial airlines to improve customer service with captioning (subtitles) for all entertainment and announcements for air passengers. While the DOT requires captioning to be available on all safety and information related videos, it does not enforce the same accessibility standard for in-flight entertainment.

The failure to ensure captioning or video description for passengers with hearing, vision, and language differences is lost value on their tickets when they cannot enjoy the same entertainment. It is not right to pay the same fare and not receive the same service.


Contact the CCAC at: CCACaptioning@gmail.com
or visit our website: http://CCACaptioning.org


Join us to push for passage of Senate Bill 556. It will pertain to all domestic flights and airlines entering or leaving from the USA. CCAC volunteers are waiting to hear from you for your interest and support. CCAC is an official non-profit, all volunteer consumer advocacy organization. The mission is to educate and advocate for inclusion of quality captioning in all places needed. Captioning is the language of millions in the USA and internationally.

Join the Air Travel Access Campaign 

CCAC asks for passage of two Senate Bills, with a focus and special interest in Senate Bill 556 about Air Travel and  captioning.  All  communications  in  airports  and  on board need to be accessible with captioning.

Air Carrier Access Amendments Act
Email Congress: Support Senate Bill 556
http://www.opencongress.org/bill/113-s556/show

See Senate Bill 555 about the Cinema Act:
http://www.opencongress.org/bill/113-s555/show

Become a CCAC member for information, inspiration, and advocacy. Millions of USA citizens and mega-millions globally deserve equal rights with real time speech to text.
Join the CCAC http://CCACaptioning.org

Read about CaptionMatch, a CCAC service to ask for any kind of captioning you need, and for providers to find extra jobs. CaptionMatch extends the education and awareness needed for communications in our connected worlds.

Contact CaptionMatch at: info@CaptionMatch.com

Link to original PDF flyer

Flyer designed and provided by Adept Word Management Inc.