Captioning / Relay - Archive

FCC Requires Closed Captioning Of IP-Delivered Video Clips

July 23, 2014 in Advocacy & Access, Captioning / Relay, Community News, Disability Law

 

FCC MOVES TO ENSURE ONLINE VIDEO CLIPS ARE ACCESSIBLE TO AMERICANS WHO ARE DEAF OR HARD OF HEARING

News Release – July 11, 2014
Proposed Ruling Released – July 14,2014

New Rules Will Require Captioning of Certain Online Video Clips Beginning in 2016

Washington, D.C. – The Federal Communications Commission today approved new rules that will require closed captioning of video clips that are posted online. The new rules further the purpose of the Twenty-First Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act of 2010 (CVAA) by helping to ensure equal access to all forms of programming by individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing when they watch video content online.
Specifically, the rules extend the Commission’s IP closed captioning rules adopted in 2012, which cover full-length videos online, to video clips if the original programming was shown on television in the United States with captions. The new rules apply to video programming distributors that air programming – including broadcasters and cable and satellite distributors— on television and then post clips of that programming on their own website or via their own mobile app. The new rules do not extend to third party websites or apps. Compliance deadlines vary based on the type of video clip. Specifically, a deadline of:

  • January 1, 2016, will apply to “straight lift” clips, which contain a single excerpt of a captioned
    television program with the same video and audio that was presented on television;
  • January 1, 2017, will apply to “montages,” which occur when a single file contains multiple straight lift clips; and
  • July 1, 2017, will apply to video clips of live and near-live television programming, such as news
    or sporting events. Distributors will have a grace period of 12 hours after the associated live
    video programming was shown on television and eight hours after the associated near-live video
    programming was shown on television before the clip must be captioned online in order to give
    distributors flexibility to post time-sensitive clips online without delay.

Finally, the requirements do not apply to video clips that are in the distributor’s online library before the
applicable compliance deadline because compliance for this category of video clips is considered to be
economically burdensome.

The Commission also issued a Second Further Notice of Proposed Rulemaking that asks for comment on
four related issues, including:

  • Application of the IP closed captioning rules to the provision of video clips by third party distributors not subject to today’s Order;
  • Whether to decrease or eliminate over time the grace periods that apply to video clips of live and near-live programming, as technological advancements facilitate the prompt online posting of such clips with captions;
  • Application of the IP closed captioning requirements to “mash-ups,” which are files that contain a combination of one or more video clips from captioned programming that has been shown on television along with other content (such as online-only content) that has not been shown on television with captions; and
  • Application of the IP closed captioning rules to “advance” video clips, which are those that are added to the distributor’s online library after the applicable compliance deadline but before the video programming is shown on television with captions, and which then remain online.

Action by the Commission July 11, 2014, by Report and Order and Second Further Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (FCC 14-97). Chairman Wheeler, Commissioners Clyburn and Rosenworcel issuing separate statements. Commissioner Pai concurring and issuing statement. Commissioner O’Rielly approving in part and concurring in part and issuing statement.

—–



 

List of related documents, background information and announcements:

FCC July 11, 2014 News Release (PDF) 

iDeafnews announcement from NAD (ASL video with captions)

Coalition of Organizations for Accessible Technology (COAT)  announcement

FCC Commission Document FCC 14-97 Released July 14, 2014
SECOND ORDER ON RECONSIDERATION AND SECOND FURTHER NOTICE OF PROPOSED RULEMAKING

CEA Study Announcement - Arlington, VA – 06/05/2014 Change is in the Air: U.S. Households Viewing TV Programming only via the Internet are Poised to Surpass those Viewing only via Antenna

 

Job Opening Captioned Telephone Outreach Coordinator – VA

July 22, 2014 in Captioning / Relay, Community News

 

Staffed in Richmond, VA

Hamilton Relay Services Division in Virginia currently has a full time position open for “Virginia Captioned Telephone Services Outreach Coordinator”.

We are an equal opportunity employer. We do not discriminate on the basis of race, religion, color, sex, age, national origin or disability. 

Position summary:  This full-time position is responsible for coordinating and implementing outreach activities designed to promote Captioned Telephone Service (CapTel®) for Virginia Captioned Telephone Service (VACTS).

Education, Experience and Skills:

  • Bachelor’s degree and two or more years of experience in the design and implementation of public outreach, public relations or related marketing experience are required.
  • Experience in the telecommunication field, Traditional Relay Service or Captioned Telephone Service is a strong plus.
  • Excellent presentation skills
  • Ability to develop effective outreach and educational campaigns
  • Ability to confidently communicate (oral & written) with a wide variety of audiences
  • Ability to plan, schedule and execute multiple projects
  • Ability to understand and follow directions
  • Capacity to develop and maintain effective working relationships with Relay Administrator, organizations within the public, private and non-profit sectors
  • Knowledge of and ability to understand various communication modes used by current and potential relay users
  • Familiarity with the user communities that could benefit from relay services:
    o   Senior Community
    o   Hard of Hearing Community
  • Able to travel alone
  • Captioned Telephone users are encouraged to apply

For the full job description and application visit www.workforhamilton.com by August 4, 2014.

Hamilton Relay, Inc. is a division of Hamilton Telecommunications based in Aurora, NE. Hamilton offers a competitive wage and company paid benefits.  For questions in regards to this position please contact our corporate HR Dept. at: 800.821.1831 

Download PDF document of posting

 

The Sorry State of Closed Captioning

July 15, 2014 in Advocacy & Access, Captioning / Relay, Technology

Streaming video now must provide subtitles for the hearing impaired. There’s no guarantee of accuracy, though. One solution: crowdsourcing.

The Atlantic
    

Article Source 

Imagine sitting down to watch an episode of Game of Thrones—and hardly being able to understand anything. That’s the case for non-native English speakers or any of the 36 million deaf or hard-of-hearing Americans. HBO doesn’t expect its viewers to have a knowledge of High Valyrian; that’s why it takes care to offer subtitles to viewers understand exactly how Daenerys intends to free the slaves of Essos.

If only most online streaming companies took as much care in everyday captioning.

Machine translation is responsible for much of today’s closed-captioning and subtitling of broadcast and online streaming video. It can’t register sarcasm, context, or word emphasis. It can’t capture the cacophonous sounds of multiple voices speaking at once, essential for understand the voice of an angry crowd of protestors or a cheering crowd. It just types what it registers. Imagine watching classic baseball comedy Major League and only hearing the sound of one fan shouting from the stands. Or only hearing every other line of lightning-fast dialogue when watching reruns of the now-classic sitcom 30 Rock.

As of April 30, streaming video companies are now required to provide closed captioning. On all programming. There’s no doubt that we’re in a better place than we were even five years ago, when streaming video companies weren’t required to closed-caption any of its content.  But, there still is a long way to go in improving the accuracy of subtitles. Netflix and Amazon Prime users have bemoaned the quality of the streaming companies’ closed captions, citing nonsense words, transcription errors, and endless “fails.” These companies blame the studios for not wanting to pay for accurate translations but excuses aren’t flying with paying streaming video subscribers.\

Marlee Matlin, the Oscar-winning actress and longtime advocate for better closed captions for the deaf and hard of hearing, recently mentioned . . .

Read more  . . .

 

InnoCaption technology for phone calls at NVRC – TODAY 7/15/14

July 15, 2014 in Captioning / Relay, Technology

 

 

Come to NVRC and Check Out the New InnoCaption Technology!
 
Chuck Owen will be in Washington, DC Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday of this week.  Chuck is the CEO of InnoCaption, which has recently launched an innovative captioning app for smartphones. InnoCaption is revolutionizing how deaf and hard of hearing persons communicate by making it possible to use the smartphone as it was intended – accessible, convenient, and mobile. Through the use of its patented technology in conjunction with live stenographers, InnoCaption provides fast, easy, and accurate real-time captioning for individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing and want to use their own voice to talk, but need assistance to understand what is being said by the hearing person they are calling or responding to.
 
If you would like to learn more about this free, innovative captioning service,
Chuck will be at NVRC TODAY 7/15/2014 at 3:30 pm.

NCRA Shares Best Practices at HLAA Convention

July 3, 2014 in Captioning / Relay, Technology

 

 

Targeted News Service
July 02, 2014
Article Source

VIENNA, Va., July 2 – The National Court Reporters Association issued the following news release:

The National Court Reporters Association (NCRA), the country’s leading organization representing stenographic court reporters, broadcast captioners, and CART captioners, was represented at the Hearing Loss Association of America’s(HLAA) Annual Conference held June 26 – 29 in Austin, Texas, during a session that focused on captioning quality as it relates to recent legislative and regulatory measures that have advanced through Congress and the Federal Communications Commission (FCC).

NCRA member Carol Studenmund, RDR, CRR, CBC, CCP, co-founder of LNC Captioning in Portland, Ore., and chair of NCRA’s Captioning Community of Interest, was joined by Adam Finkel, NCRA assistant director of government relations and co-chair of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Alliance. NCRA has long worked closely with HLAA through its involvement with the Alliance.

The educational session provided attendees with a history of captioning laws and regulations, as well as best practices for ensuring live captioning quality as the broadcast industry comes into compliance with recently approved new FCCregulations. The new regulations require program creators and distributors to make their best effort to insure that captions are accurate, synchronous, complete, and do not obscure important information. The new regulations also apply to online video shows that originated on television.

“I could not have been more pleased to represent NCRA at the Hearing Loss Association’s Annual Convention. It was incredible to be able to connect with so many fierce advocates for broadcast captioning and CART captioning, and to brainstorm ways to help make these services more readily available to consumers across the country. The topic of the FCC’s captioning quality guidelines attracted great interest and numerous questions from attendees,” said Finkel.

During the session, Studenmund and Finkel cited best practices supported by NCRA which urge captioning companies to provide periodic quality reviews of individual captioners, alert clients immediately if a technical issue arises, and respond in a timely manner to issues raised by clients or viewers.

According to Studenmund, who also serves as vice chair and commissioner of theMount Hood Cable Regulatory Commission in Portland, many captioning companies are pleased with the new FCC regulations as well as the increase in the number of broadcast stations that are now offering live captioning instead of the electronic newsroom technique which can often lead to confusing or incorrect translations. Early feedback indicates that the use of live captioners for broadcasts has led to many improvements in the quality of captions being included in broadcasts, she added.

Read more . . .

FCC moves to caption the Web

July 2, 2014 in Captioning / Relay, Technology

The Federal Communications Commission is taking another step to make the Internet more accessible, voting next month on rules for closed captioning online video clips.

The vote, planned for the FCC’s July meeting, is the result of a years-long push — and Chairman Tom Wheeler’s personal interest — to increase accessibility online.

But the companies that would have to do the legwork to get the closed captions on online videos are warning the FCC to avoid unreasonable technological demands and timelines.

Accessibility concerns, especially for the deaf and hard-of-hearing community, have been a prominent issue for Wheeler since being sworn in as chairman late last year.

Earlier this year, the FCC moved forward with requirements that will allow users to send text messages to emergency services. Those requirements are aimed at helping, among others, the deaf and hard-of-hearing who are unable to make voice 911 calls.

At the vote’s conclusion, Wheeler pledged — signing along in American sign language — that text-to-911 would be just one of his efforts as chairman to help the deaf and hearing impaired community.


Read more: http://thehill.com/policy/technology/210881-fcc-moves-to-caption-the-web#ixzz36Jyv3HLW

Why TV captions are still so terebel

June 26, 2014 in Captioning / Relay, Community News

 

 

QUARTZ
Source: http://qz.com/220541/why-tv-captions-are-still-so-terebel/
By Tammy H. Nam June 23, 2014

Imagine sitting down to watch an episode of the HBO hit series Game of Thrones—and hardly being able to understand anything. That’s the case for non-native English speakers or any of the 36 million deaf or hard-of-hearing Americans. HBO doesn’t expect its viewers to have a knowledge of High Valyrian; that’s why it takes care to offer subtitles to viewers understand exactly how Daenerys intends to free the slaves of Essos.

If only most online streaming companies took as much care in everyday captioning.

Machine translation is responsible for much of today’s closed-captioning and subtitling of broadcast and online streaming video. It can’t register sarcasm, context, or word emphasis. It can’t capture the cacophonous sounds of multiple voices speaking at once, essential for understand the voice of an angry crowd of protestors or a cheering crowd. It just types what it registers. Imagine watching classic baseball comedy Major League and only hearing the sound of one fan shouting from the stands. Or only hearing every other line of lightning-fast dialogue when watching reruns of the now-classic sitcom 30 Rock.

As of April 30, streaming video companies are now required to provide closed captioning. On all programming. There’s no doubt that we’re in a better place than we were even five years ago, when streaming video companies weren’t required to closed-caption any of its content.  But, there still is a long way to go in improving the accuracy of subtitles. Netflix and Amazon Prime users have bemoaned the quality of the streaming companies’ closed captions, citing nonsense words, transcription errors, and endless “fails.” These companies blame the studios for not wanting to pay for accurate translations but excuses aren’t flying with paying streaming video subscribers.

REI NETWORK WEBINAR: Better Money Habits: Understanding Credit

June 26, 2014 in Captioning / Relay, Community Events

 

( NVRC.org note: This webinar will have real time captioning)

REGISTER TODAY!

Date and time: Wednesday, July 9, 2014 3:00 pm
Eastern Daylight Time (New York, GMT-04:00)
Change time zone
Wednesday, July 9, 2014 2:00 pm
Central Daylight Time (Chicago, GMT-05:00)
Wednesday, July 9, 2014 1:00 pm
Mountain Daylight Time (Denver, GMT-06:00)
Wednesday, July 9, 2014 12:00 pm
Pacific Daylight Time (San Francisco, GMT-07:00)

 

Join National Disability Institute (NDI) and Bank of America as we explore and discuss the importance of credit. In today’s economy, establishing, building and improving one’s credit is more important than ever. Unfortunately, however, individuals with disabilities may experience unique challenges pursuing this endeavor. This webinar will address those challenges by providing an overview of credit, identifying ways to build credit and discussing the ramifications of poor credit as it relates employment. In addition, the webinar will introduce valuable financial tools and resources — including Bank of America’s Better Money Habits program — that allow individuals to access a free credit report, explain how to use credit wisely and instill the importance of maintaining good credit. REGISTER TODAY!

In this webinar, we will:

  • Define credit, how to build credit, why good credit is important, the impact of poor credit
  • Discuss how to access a free credit report, identify and dispute any errors
  • Identify resources for those you serve
  • Identify challenges experienced by persons with disabilities

Identify new tools and resources to help an individual build their credit score

Please note: Real time captioning will be provided for this webinar. For other accommodation requests, questions about the webinar, or the registration process, please contact Keith Combs at kcombs@ndi-inc.org.

MD – JOB OPENING TRS OUTREACH COORDINATOR

June 20, 2014 in Captioning / Relay, Community News

 

 

JOB OPENING TRS OUTREACH COORDINATOR
Staffed in Baltimore, MD 

Hamilton Relay Services Division in Maryland currently has a full time position open for “TRS Outreach Coordinator”.

This position will be staffed in Baltimore, MD.

We are an equal opportunity employer. We do not discriminate on the basis of race, religion, color, sex, age, national origin or disability. 

Position summary: This full-time position is responsible for coordinating and implementing outreach activities designed to promote TRS and increase the number of customers served by Maryland Relay. Individual will devote 100% of their time to Maryland Relay and is required to travel throughout the state of Maryland.

Applicants with the ability to communicate through the use of American Sign Language is required. A Bachelor’s Degree or comparable work experience along with a minimum of two years public relations experience is preferred. Strong written, analytical and interpersonal skills as well as a driver’s license and ability to travel alone are required. Direct work experience with a Telecommunications Relay Service is also preferred. Deaf and hard of hearing individuals are encouraged to apply.

For the full job description and application visit www.workforhamilton.com by July 7, 2014.

Maryland Relay TRS Outreach Coordinator Job Description

We are an equal opportunity employer. We do not discriminate on the basis of race, religion, color, sex, age, national origin or disability.

Hamilton Relay, Inc. is a division of Hamilton Telecommunications based in Aurora, NE. Hamilton offers a competitive wage and company paid benefits. For questions in regards to this position please contact our corporate HR Dept. at: 800.821.

Senator wants closed captioning of in-flight movies

June 12, 2014 in Captioning / Relay, Transportation

 

 

The Hill
By Keith Laing - 06/05/14 03:16 PM EDT
Source: http://thehill.com/policy/transportation/208402-sen-harkin-wants-closed-captioning-of-in-flight-movies#ixzz34TXLytW9

Sen. Tom Harkin (D-Iowa) wants U.S. airlines to add closed captioning to movies that are shown during long flights in an effort to aid hearing impaired airline passengers. inflight-entertainment

Harkin said he was considering adding an amendment requiring the airline industry to at least study the proposal to a $54 billion funding bill for the departments of Transportation and Housing and Urban Development during a markup of the measure on Thursday. 

“I have been trying for some time to get the airlines to provide closed captions on the movies on their airplanes. I can’t understand why they don’t do it. It doesn’t cost anything,” Harkin said after the Senate Appropriations Committee voted to send the measure to the full of the floor Senate. 

Harkin said the idea of close captioning in-flight movies may seem trivial, but he said it was very important to people who are deaf and hard of hearing.

“I have a friend of mine who’s deaf who is a lawyer who travels to Europe [who] likes to watch a movie, can’t,” Harkin said. “The only movie he can watch is a German or a French movie that has English subtitles. But if it’s an American movie, it has French subtitles and German subtitles and Chinese subtitles, but not English subtitles.”

Read more: http://thehill.com/policy/transportation/208402-sen-harkin-wants-closed-captioning-of-in-flight-movies#ixzz34TXEeiaM

Sign-Interpreted and Captioned Kennedy Center Theater Alert

May 29, 2014 in Captioning / Relay, Community Events, Interpreting & Transliterating

 

 

the-kennedy-centerOriginal Announcement - http://www.kennedy-center.org/email/live_archive/email_7603_viewable.html 

Should Federal Judge Make Redbox DVD Obey ADA Demands?

May 22, 2014 in Captioning / Relay, Disability Law

 

 

Categories: Court

Original Source - http://blogs.ocweekly.com/navelgazing/2014/05/redbox_dvd_lawsuit.php

California_jurisdiction

The success of Redbox Automated Retail DVD rentals is undeniable after capturing more than 33 percent of the national market, but one Orange County man believes the operation is callously discriminatory against deaf customers and he’s demanding compensation.

Bellevue, Washington-based Redbox has illegally “failed to provide equal access to their DVD and Blu-ray and video streaming services by refusing to make available closed captioned text for the deaf and hard of hearing–a feature that is necessary for such individuals to understand the audio portion of the video content,” according to Francis Jancik’s lawsuit.

In Jancik’s view, Redbox’s self-service, DVD rental kiosks are “places of public accommodation” and therefore fall under the requirements of The California Disabled Persons Act, the state’s Unruh Civil Rights Act and The Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA).

The problem with Redbox for the deaf is that “it is difficult, if not impossible” to know in advance which movies include closed captioning, according to the lawsuit.As examples of what Jancik sees as unfair business practices, his lawsuit includes Redbox advertisements for Assault on Wall Street and The Adventures of Mickey Matson: Cooperhead Treasure; both ads erroneously claim closed caption service.

Read More  . . .

Miracom USA receives a conditional cert to provide IP / Captioned Telephone Service

May 15, 2014 in Captioning / Relay, Technology

 

 

FCC’s Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau grants Miracom USA a conditional certification to provide Internet Protocol Captioned Telephone Service

On May 13, 2014, the FCC’s Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau released a Public Notice granting conditional certification to Miracom USA to provide Internet Protocol Captioned Telephone Service (IP CTS), a form of telecommunications relay services (TRS) that is eligible for compensation from the Interstate TRS Fund.  Miracom stated in its application for certification that it plans to offer IP CTS under a brand name, Innocaption, which is designed for registered users to place and receive IP CTS calls with their mobile devices.

Links to the Public Notice:

Word: http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DA-14-644A1.doc

PDF: http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DA-14-644A1.pdf

Text:  http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DA-14-644A1.txt

For further information, please contact Gregory Hlibok, Chief, Disability Rights Office, Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau, at (202) 559-5158 (voice/videophone), (202) 418-0431 (TTY), or e-mail at Gregory.Hlibok@fcc.gov.

Program provides big changes for hearing impaired

May 12, 2014 in Captioning / Relay, Community News

 

 

BY CATHY DYSON / THE FREE LANCE–STAR

http://www.freelancestar.com/2014-05-11/articles/35634/program-provides-big-changes-for-hearing-impaired/

Arva Priola tends to bring people to tears—but that’s not a bad thing.

She coordinates programs for the deaf and hard of hearing at the disAbility Resource Center in Fredericksburg. When she connects people with devices that let them resume normal activities—such as talking on the phone with friends and family—she breaks out in a smile while they cry tears of joy.

That’s what Mary Beth Conrad did the first time she used a Hamilton CapTel phone. The 54-year-old suffered extreme hearing loss last summer after a near-fatal bout of pneumonia.

“The hearing loss had profoundly affected my personal life,” said Conrad. “This phone, which I jokingly refer to as the ‘Bat phone,’ has opened up my world. I use it every day, several times a day.”

The phone’s enlarged screen displays what the person on the other end is saying.

Conrad reads the words, replies, and the conversation proceeds as normal.

MORE THAN HEARING AIDS

Priola also is hearing impaired and uses the CapTel phone and other devices to communicate.

“Oh, it’s a blessing,” she said about programs available through the Virginia Department for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing.

Read Full Article . . .

 

Association for Airline Passenger Rights Partners with Caption First for Access

May 8, 2014 in Captioning / Relay, Community News, Emergency Preparedness, Hearing Loss & Deafness, Transportation

 

Association for Airline Passenger Rights and Caption First Announce Partnership to Promote Greater Accessibility

May 06, 2014 from http://www.eturbonews.com/45444/association-airline-passenger-rights-and-caption-first-announce-AAPR-logo-300x300

The Association for Airline Passenger Rights, (AAPR) today announced a new partnership with Caption First, a leading communication access company that provides CART, captioning and
transcription. The AAPR-Caption First partnership will ensure that realtime captioning services are provided for all AAPR information and programs, thereby making them fully accessible for members who are Deaf or hard of hearing. Realtime captioning is the practice of converting the spoken word into instant text. The partnership also aims to identify best practices to be used within the aviation industry to ensure air travel is made more accessible for passengers with hearing impairments.

In February 2010, AAPR was the first airline passenger rights group to call on the U.S. Department of Transportation to require commercial air carriers to provide closed captioning or subtitles on all in-flight entertainment for passengers with hearing loss. While DOT requires that captioning be available on all safety and information-related videos, it does not enforce the same accessibility standard for in-flight entertainment, such as movies and television shows.

“We’re excited to team up with Caption First, who will be aiding us with the conversion of speech into text for all of our programmatic activities,” stated Brandon M. Macsata, Executive Director of the Association for Airline Passenger Rights, of the partnership with Caption First. “With our partnership, we’re taking the necessary steps to provide word-for-word services that are easy to use whenever, wherever and however needed. In other words, we’re leading by example.”

The seeds for the new partnership were sowed in December 2013, when Caption First served as one of the sponsors for the 1st Annual Airline Accessibility Conference. To learn more about the conference, or download a transcription of it, go to http://www.flyfriendlyskies.com.events.html.

“Caption First is delighted to partner with the Association for Airline Passenger Rights,” stated Patricia Graves, President of Caption First. “For too long the communication needs of passengers who are Deaf or hard of hearing have been ignored. We look forward to working with AAPR to create positive changes in the aviation industry.”

For more information about the Association for Airline Passenger Rights or its partnership with Caption First, please visit www.flyfriendlyskies.com or contact AAPR directly at info@flyfriendlyskies.com.