Research - Archive

Research Study on Benefits of Post-Implantation Training

April 13, 2014 in Community News, Research

Invites Adult Cochlear Implant Users to Participate

*Washington DC/ Maryland/Virginia Residents Only*

What is the Study’s Purpose?
This study is looking at the effectiveness of training for adults who have received cochlear implants. We would like to determine whether a special training program can help cochlear implant users improve their understanding of speech and communication in daily life.

Who Can Participate?
Participants must be 18 years of age or older, post-lingually deafened (onset of hearing loss after having learned spoken language), fluent in English, and have had their cochlear implant between three months and three years.

Benefits?
Participating in this study may improve your communication ability, further knowledge in this area, and help determine the best training method for cochlear implant users.

When and Where?
Participation will require eight weekly visits (90 minutes each) scheduled at your convenience. There will be two follow-up visits; one at two months and one at six months following the last training session (also running 90 minutes each).

You will be able to participate at one of several Washington Metropolitan area locations including Gallaudet University and George Washington University in Washington, D.C., the Hearing Loss Association of America’s national office in Bethesda, Maryland, and the Hearing and Speech Agency in Baltimore, Maryland. 

Some of the training sessions are now available on site at the Northern Virginia Resource Center in Fairfax,Virginia 

To get more information on how to enroll in this study, please contact: Claire Bernstein, Ph.D,  Gallaudet University,at 202-448-7204, or send an email to: CITrainingStudy@hearingresearch.org

This study has been approved by the Institutional Review Boards at Gallaudet University and The George Washington University. Identifying information will be kept confidential.

Hearing Loss Affects Personality Among Elderly

April 4, 2014 in Community News, Research

From IANS, 4/2/2014
Read Original Article

 Hearing loss among old people leaves a deep impact in their personality as well, research finds.

The researchers studied 400 people in the age group of 80-98 over a period of six years.

They were assessed in terms of physical and mental measures as well as personality aspects such as extraversion, which reflects the inclination to be outgoing and emotional stability in every two years.

The results show that even if the emotional stability remained constant over the period, the participants became less outgoing.

Read more . . . →

Webinar: Measuring the Financial Capability of Persons with Disabilities

March 26, 2014 in Community Events, Research

Measuring the Financial Capability of Persons with Disabilities

WHEN – Wednesday, April 9, 2014 3 pm to 4:15 pm EST

Realtime captioning will be provided. For other accommodation requests, and questions about the webinar or the registration process, contact Keith Combs at kcombs@ndi-inc.org

Join National Disability Institute and Bank of America as we discuss measuring the financial capability of persons with disabilities. Financial Capability is defined as building knowledge and skills for informed decision making about budgeting, money management, credit, debt, and savings that lead to tangible improvements in an individual’s financial health and stability. Financial capability is often measured by whether consumers can cover monthly expenses with income, track spending, plan ahead, save for the future and effectively navigate, select and manage financial products and services. For persons with disabilities, there are additional indicators to be considered when measuring financial capability. This webinar will identify NDI’s Financial Capability Indicators for Persons with Disabilities and explore new tools and strategies that organizations can use to improve the financial capability of persons with disabilities.

Webinar objectives:

  • Define financial capability
  • Define and understand financial capability indicators for persons with disabilities
  • Identify tools and strategies to improve the financial capability of persons with disabilities
  • Understand the connection between financial capability and employment goals

Register for this webinar by clicking on or copying and pasting the following link:https://ndiwebinars.webex.com/ndiwebinars/onstage/g.php?t=a&d=660464703

This webinar is made possible by 
Bank of America
NDI would like to thank our 2014 sponsors:

ACORDA, Walmart, & Bank of America

Hearing Loss Tied to Depression in Study

March 20, 2014 in Research

Women, non-seniors more likely to be affected this way, researchers say

Hearing Loss Tied to Depression in Study
By Kathleen Doheny
HealthDay ReporterTHURSDAY, March 6, 2014 (HealthDay News) — Hearing loss is associated with depression among American adults, especially women and those younger than age 70, according to new research.

While other studies previously have found the same link, many of them looked only at older adults or at specific regions or ethnicities, and results have been mixed, the researchers pointed out.

In the new study, as hearing declined, the percentage of depressed adults increased — from about 5 percent in those who had no hearing problems to more than 11 percent in those who did.

Read original article . . .

Univ. of Fla. researchers find potential way to prevent hearing loss

March 19, 2014 in Community News, Research

Gainsville Sun

Tuesday,  at 11:17 by 

Once you lose your hearing, you don’t get it back–at least not biologically.

For that reason, scientists are keen on preventing hearing loss, particularly if it’s induced by common medications.

University of Florida researchers have come up with a way that at least in animals (guinea pigs) helps prevent the hearing loss caused by the antibiotic called gentamicin, which belongs to a class of antibiotic . . . .

Read More . . .

Researchers receive $3 million grant from NIH to study effects of asymmetric hearing loss

March 18, 2014 in Research

Published on March 13, 2014 at 2:13 AM

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have received a five-year, $3 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to study the effects of asymmetric hearing loss in adults and children.

Read more . . .

NewsMedical.net


 

Researchers find potential cure for noise-induced hearing loss

February 28, 2014 in Research

From KLTV7 – KLTV.com 2/26/14

A new procedure could soon help people who have noise-induced hearing loss.

A new procedure could soon help people who have noise-induced hearing loss.

By Kristen King - email,

If you know someone who works in a construction site or listens to their music a little too loudly, then this story is for you. Very loud noises are one of the most common causes of hearing loss. Now a new study says that loss of hearing may not have to be permanent.

Almost 50 million Americans are affected by hearing loss. Dr Jennifer Holdman of Livingston Audiology and Hearing Aid Center gives tests to determine noise induced hearing loss.

“We have noise exposure from occupations. Right now, hearing aids are the only solution. Nothing’s perfect but we can get people where they need to be able to communicate clearly with their loved ones,” says Holdman.

Read more . . . .

Copyright 2014 KLTV. All rights reserved.

 

 

FDA Study of Cord Blood Stem Cells to Treat Hearing Loss

January 20, 2014 in Research

FDA-Regulated Study of Cord Blood Stem Cells
to Treat Acquired Hearing Loss Launches

From PR Newswire

SAN BRUNO, Calif., Jan. 16, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ – Cord Blood Registry® (CBR®), the world’s largest and most experienced newborn stem cell company, announces the start of a U.S. Food and Drug (FDA)-regulated study being conducted at Florida Hospital for Children in Orlando to investigate the use of a child’s stem cells from their own stored umbilical cord blood as a treatment for acquired sensorineural hearing loss.

<image001.jpg>In the United States, approximately 15 percent of children suffer from low or high-frequency hearing loss.[i] The most common type of hearing loss, especially at high frequencies, is sensorineural. Acquired sensorineural hearing loss results from damage to hair cells in the inner ear (cochlea) and can be caused by illness, medication, noise exposure, birth injury, or head trauma. A child’s ability to hear affects the development of language skills, and hearing impairments can lead to poor academic and social development.[ii]

The groundbreaking phase 1 study has a primary objective of determining the safety of using cord blood stem cells in a select pediatric patient population while also assessing whether this approach to treatment improves inner ear function, speech, and language development. Researchers will follow 10 children, ranging in age from 6 weeks to 6 years, who have been diagnosed with acquired hearing loss for less than 18 months and who have their own cord blood unit processed and stored under CBR’s strict quality controls. Children with a known genetic cause of deafness are ineligible for study participation. Patients will receive one intravenous infusion of their own umbilical cord blood stem cells. All patients will return for follow-up at 1 month, 6 months, and 1 year post-treatment.

The trial, supported by CBR, follows promising evidence from preclinical studies suggesting that the infusion of human umbilical cord stem cells may help repair damaged cells in the inner ear in ways that could lead to hearing improvement.[iii]

“As more children survive premature birth, we are observing increasing numbers of very young children with significant acquired hearing loss, and currently there are no therapies available for reversing that damage,” says Linda Baumgartner M.S., CCC-SLP, LSLS cert. AVT, the trial’s Speech and Language Pathologist and hearing loss expert.  James Baumgartner, MD, Surgical Director of Florida Hospital for Children’s Comprehensive Pediatric Epilepsy Center and the study’s principal investigator notes that “presently, the only treatment options for acquired sensorineural hearing loss are hearing aids or cochlear implants, neither of which actually repairs the damage. Read the rest of the story at http://bit.ly/1dYrxpl

 

Obesity May Be Linked to Hearing Loss

December 12, 2013 in Hearing Loss & Deafness, Research

By Brenda Goodman, HealthDay 12/10/2013

To read the full article: http://bit.ly/1bZRZmR

Listen up: Being obese, especially if you carry those extra pounds around your waist, might be linked to hearing loss, a new study suggests.

Researchers tracked more than 68,000 women participating in the Harvard Nurses’ Health Study. Every two years from 1989 to 2009, the women answered detailed questions about their health and daily habits. In 2009, they were asked if they’d experienced hearing loss, and, if so, at what age

One in six women reported hearing loss during the study period, the researchers said.

Those with a higher body-mass index (BMI) or larger waist circumference faced a higher risk for hearing problems compared to normal-weight women. BMI is a measurement of body fat based on a ratio of height and weight.

Read more . . . →

Research Finds Positive Long-term Outcomes of Cochlear Implantation

November 27, 2013 in Research

Research finds positive long-term outcomes of cochlear implantation

From Penn State Brandywine Campus, 11/26/2013

http://www.brandywine.psu.edu/Information/News/34838.htm

Penn State Brandywine Assistant Professor of Psychology Daniela Martin is on the frontline of significant, unique research.  With the first generation of cochlear implant recipients reaching adulthood, Martin and her colleagues are out to discover the long-term psychological outcomes of this relatively new medical procedure.

A cochlear implant is a small electronic device surgically implanted into the inner ear that provides a sense of sound to those who are profoundly deaf or who are hearing impaired.

Because of today’s cochlear implant technology; profoundly deaf children frequently attend mainstream schools with children who have normal hearing, which wasn’t always an option in the past.

Read more . . . →

Loud Noise Could Cause Hearing Loss in Unborn, Newborn Babies

November 26, 2013 in Community News, Research

Noise could cause hearing loss in unborn and newborn babies

By Diana Nabiruma, The Observer 11/26/2013

One expectant mother was advised by other mothers, to expose her unborn baby to loud noises.

“Your home is too quiet. If you continue staying there all the time, your baby will not be used to noise when she is born and every small noise will upset her. You should go to loud places like nightclubs or the taxi park so that your baby gets used to noise.”

The expectant mother heeded their advice and whenever she could, she hauled her heavy self off to loud bars. And when her daughter was born, she was quite desensitized to noise. She could sleep next to a music system playing music at volume 20 and not wake up. This mother was quite proud of her achievement.

Read more . . . →

Adult Cochlear Implant Users Sought for Study at NVRC

November 7, 2013 in Community News, Research

Research Study on Benefits of Post-Implantation Training
Invites Adult Cochlear Implant Users to Participate at NVRC and Other Locations

*Washington DC/ Maryland/Virginia Residents Only*

What is the Study’s Purpose?
This study is looking at the effectiveness of training for adults who have received cochlear implants. We would like to determine whether a special training program can help cochlear implant users improve their understanding of speech and communication in daily life.

Who Can Participate?
Participants must be 18 years of age or older, post-lingually deafened (onset of hearing loss after having learned spoken language), fluent in English, and have had their cochlear implant between three months and three years.

Benefits?
Participating in this study may improve your communication ability, further knowledge in this area, and help determine the best training method for cochlear implant users.

When and Where?
Participation will require eight weekly visits (90 minutes each) scheduled at your convenience. There will be two follow-up visits; one at two months and one at six months following the last training session (also running 90 minutes each).

You will be able to participate at one of several Washington Metropolitan area locations including Gallaudet University and George Washington University in Washington, D.C., the Hearing Loss Association of America’s national office in Bethesda, Maryland, and the Hearing and Speech Agency in Baltimore, Maryland.

Some of the training sessions are now available on site at the Northern Virginia Resource Center in Fairfax, Virginia 

To get more information on how to enroll in this study, please contact: Claire Bernstein, Ph.D,  Gallaudet University,at 202-448-7204, or send an email to: CITrainingStudy@hearingresearch.org

This study has been approved by the Institutional Review Boards at Gallaudet University and The George Washington University. Identifying information will be kept confidential.

 


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. You do not need permission to share this information, but please be sure to credit NVRC.  This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

Georgetown University Celebrating ASL Film

November 7, 2013 in Community News, Research

Georgetown University Celebrating ASL Film
November 15, 2013

From Alice Hagemeyer

Georgetown University in DC will be celebrating the 100th anniversary of the NAD film: Preservation of the Sign Language. It will sponsor a public lecture series to celebrate the innovative research of Georgetown-trained pioneers and build new collaborations for conducting digital multi-media research in sign language and deaf communities.

 

On November 15, 2013, three such pioneers will be from the deaf community, John Schuchman, Barbara Kannapell and Dennis Cokely who will be featured at a series of panel workshops, from 1 pm to 5 pm.  From 7pm to 9pm, there will also be a multi-media festival showcasing the rich history of sign language in America through historical movies and the works of different emerging artists.  OPEN TO THE PUBLIC!  AND FREE OF CHARGE!

 

Ted Supalla, Director, Sign Language Research Laboratory, is the faculty coordinator. For more information:  http://cbpr.georgetown.edu/researchlabs/slrl/    Contact person: Matt Malzkuhn, email: mlm316@georgetwon.educ.

 

Enjoy!

 

And please do not forget to support FOLDA in its effort to promote library access and quality resources for the deaf diversity, inclulding the hearing, on all levels: locally, statewide, nationally and internationally.

And most importantly, please build the future DEAF CULTURE DIGITAL LIBRARY (DCDL) in America. And globally!   They will come!

 

FOLDA has developed a Kit on George W. Veditz which sells for only 5 dollars each.  25 dollars if we add a binder and one complimentary poster of George W. Veditz by famed artist, Nancy Rourke. Add $3 for the postage. Make checks payable to Library for Deaf Action and mail to 2930 Craiglawn Rd, Silver Spring, MD 20904-1816.    It is a fundraiser for Organizations Serving the Deaf (OSD) with interests to develop own projects to promote public awareness of their history and contributions to the society.

 


Alice L. Hagemeyer, President

FOLDA   Editor: FOLDA NEWS

Creator of the two Series: Bridging Deaf Cultures and I Made America Great!

Email: folda86@aol.com

 


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. You do not need permission to share this information, but please be sure to credit NVRC.  This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

CI, Hearing Aid Users Sought for Study at NVRC Nov. 13

November 6, 2013 in Community News, Research

UPDATE!

Cochlear Implant and Hearing Aid Users Needed

to Participate in a Study of Video Telephone Services for Lipreading at NVRC

 

Direct video telephone calls permit you to see your calling partner while you are talking with them on the phone.

A study is being conducted by Gallaudet University to investigate the level of quality that will lead to effective use of video telephone services for lipreading by people with hearing loss.

Testing will take place on Wednesday, November 13, from 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. at the Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf & Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA  22030

Each test session lasts for one hour.  You will be paid $20 for your participation.

** You are welcome to participate in this study even if you participated in our last study. **

Individuals who are interested in participating:

  • Must be 18 years of age or older
  • Must be a daily cochlear implant or hearing aid user
  • Must use the telephone (rather than TTY or Relay) regularly for most of their calls, and
  • Must have normal or near normal (20/30 corrected) vision and no eye disease.

The study takes approximately 60 minutes.  During that time, you will complete a vision screening and a brief questionnaire.  Then, while using your hearing device, you will listen to and watch a speaker saying sentences and repeat what you thought the speaker said. You will be video recorded during some of the test sets. Finally, you will provide ratings of mental effort and opinions based on your viewing experience.  You will receive $20 for your participation.

Contact Paula Tucker at paula.tucker@gallaudet.edu if you would like to participate.

This study has been approved by the Gallaudet University Institutional Review Board.


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. You do not need permission to share this information, but please be sure to credit NVRC.  This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

Study Finds Captions Make Big Difference for All Students

October 14, 2013 in Captioning / Relay, Research

Video Captions Improve Comprehension

Science Daily, 10/11/2013

Thanks to Collaborative for Communication Access via Captioning

http://ccacaptioning.org/

A simple change — switching on captions — can make a big difference when students watch educational videos, an SF State professor has discovered.

Robert Keith Collins, an assistant professor of American Indian studies, found that students’ test scores and comprehension improved dramatically when captions were used while watching videos. The tool is often utilized for students with learning disabilities, but Collins says his results show captions can be beneficial to all students.

Collins developed the idea while he was a member of a faculty learning committee focused on ways to make the classroom more accessible to all students. During the first year of a two-year case study, he showed videos without captions to establish a baseline of student comprehension. Once that baseline was established, he turned captions on and began to see improvements. Those improvements continued into the second year of the study.

“Not only were students talking about how much having the captions helped them as they took notes, their test scores went up,” Collins said. “During the baseline year, there were a lot of Cs. In the second years, they went from Cs, Ds and Fs to As, Bs and Cs. It was really significant improvement.”

That improvement didn’t just manifest itself in grades. Class discussions also became livelier and more detailed, with students recalling specific information shown in the videos such as names of people and places.

“We’re living in an age where our students are so distracted by technology that they sometimes forget where they should focus their attention when engaged with technology or media,” he said. “Turning on captions seems to enable students to focus on specific information.”

The study was unique, Collins added, in that it explored captions’ impact broadly, as opposed to other studies that examined their effect solely on students with learning disabilities.
For the rest of the story: http://bit.ly/16ZzjSZ

 


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. You do not need permission to share this information, but please be sure to credit NVRC.  This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.