Hearing Loss & Deafness - Archive

Join the fun at DogFest Walk ‘n Roll! – Sept. 17th

June 28, 2016 in Advocacy & Access, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

September 17th – 10am
Pentagon Row – 1101 S. Joyce St. 
Arlington, VA 22202

You can change lives! dogfest16

Canine Companions for Independence® DogFest Walk ‘n RollTM is a national event that raises funds to provide life-changing assistance dogs to children and adults with disabilities. Your participation at DogFest Washington DC will make a difference. Register now for this family and dog-friendly event. It’s FREE!

Our goal is to raise $65,000, and we need your help. It costs approximately $50,000 to breed, raise, train and provide ongoing support for the working life of a Canine Companions dog and its human partner.

Please join us at DogFest Washington DC  because together we can change lives, four paws at a timeTM

More Information – REGISTER

Cards assist law enforcement, drivers with hearing loss

June 23, 2016 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

Mich_Police_cards

The communication card is designed to be stored on a sun visor, in a bag or backpack, or on a passenger seat for easy use. To download the card, visit www.michigan.gov/doddbhh. (Image provided by the Michigan Department of Civil Rights)

C&G Newspapers – METRO DETROIT
Posted June 22, 2016

METRO DETROIT — The Michigan Department of Civil Rights has released a new communication tool that will ease communication between law enforcement and individuals who are deaf or have partial hearing loss.

Supported by statewide law enforcement organizations — including the Michigan State Police, the Michigan Sheriffs’ Association and the Michigan Association of Chiefs of Police — the communication card is designed to be stored on a sun visor, in a bag or backpack, or on a passenger seat for easy use.

One side of the card notifies law enforcement that the person is either deaf or has partial hearing loss. It offers quick tips to facilitate communication, including, but not limited to, “Get my attention first,” “Make eye contact when you speak,” and “I cannot lip-read everything you say.”

Read more . . . Cards

 

 

SERTOMA GRANT OPENS NEW DOORS AT ASPEN DEAF CAMP

June 23, 2016 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

The energetic youthful campers at the Aspen Camp in Snowmass, Colorado, partake in a wide variety of team building and outdoor activities that have been funded by generous donations, and grants from organizations such as Sertoma. Sertoma’s recent grant helped Aspen Camp fund new scholarships and camp activities.

June 17, 2016

Ah, the sweet essence and experience of summer camp. It is place where freedom and adventure intertwine, new relationships grow and comfort zones dissolve.

For those attending Aspen Camp in Snowmass, Colorado, it is a special opportunity for both Deaf* children and Deaf* adults to explore new realms, relationships and the outdoors.

Read more  . . . about Deaf Camp 

Transportation survey to understand needs of older adults and individuals with disabilities – for Fairfax County

June 16, 2016 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness, Transportation

 

As part of a grant initiative, Fairfax County is seeking help to understand the transportation patterns and mobility needs of older adults and individuals with disabilities within the county and the Cities of Fairfax and Falls Church. In order to do so, a survey has been created to measure the needs of the community.

If you are a senior, an individual with a disability, or a caregiver or family member to someone with transportation challenges,  please consider taking a few moments to complete a brief survey.  

www.fairfaxcounty.gov/ncs/transportation/mobility

Your feedback will help identify improvements and strategies that will continue to allow those to age in place in the Fairfax community.

This survey will close August 1st.

Questions regarding this survey or requests for alternative format can be directed to Susan Shaw (703.324.7075) or Cynthia Alarico (703.324.7055).

DOWNLOAD Mobility Survey in PDF format

 

Don’t Make Us Beg – Gael Hannan

June 16, 2016 in Advocacy & Access, Hearing Aids, Hearing Loss & Deafness, Wearables

 

 

Better Hearing Consumer
By Gael Hannan
June 14, 2016

It’s the kind of news that makes the hard of hearing heart beat faster.

No, there’s been no proclamation of National 50% Off Hearing Aids Day.

No announcement of a little pink pill that will make damaged cochlear hair cells spring back to life.

No scientific proof of a twice-daily mantra that will calm the neurons firing off tinnitus cannons in our heads.

It’s more like a climate change event, with the barometer rising in the world of hearing health care.

On June 2nd, the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NAS) issued what is considered a ground-breaking report: Hearing Health Care for Adults: Priorities for Improving Access and Affordability.  A powerhouse expert committee, comprised of members from all stakeholder groups, assessed the state of hearing health care, its affordability and accessibility for adults in the United States.

Read more . . . Don’t Make Us Beg

Panel: Treating hearing loss shouldn’t be a pricey hassle

June 16, 2016 in Community News, Hearing Aids, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

Fredericksburg.com
Posted: Sunday, June 12, 2016
Associated Press |

WASHINGTON—Treating hearing loss shouldn’t be such a pricey hassle. That’s the message from a prestigious government advisory group that’s calling on Medicare and other agencies to find ways to make better hearing more affordable and accessible for millions of older Americans.

One proposal: Allow over-the-counter sales of simple devices for mild hearing problems as an alternative to full hearing aids—much like consumers with vision problems today choose between drugstore reading glasses or prescription bifocals.

The report says action is important because hearing loss isn’t just a struggle for individuals but a growing public health problem, putting untreated seniors at extra risk of social isolation, depression, even dementia.

Read more  . . . government advisory group

Six Steps Those With Hearing Loss Can Take to Communicate Better

June 16, 2016 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

Huffington Post – The Blog
by Shari Eberts
06/14/2016

Those of us with hearing loss must sometimes rely on those with normal hearing to help us have better conversations and more successful interactions with the hearing world. See my post on this topic here. But we must also take responsibility for stacking the deck in our own favor. By following some simple rules of thumb, we can put ourselves in a better position to hear and communicate as best as is possible. Here are my tips. Please share yours in the comments.

SIX STEPS THOSE WITH HEARING LOSS CAN TAKE TO SUCCEED WITH COMMUNICATIONS

 

1. Be assertive and inform others: Don’t be shy about disclosing your hearing loss. If someone does not know   . . . Read More  . . .  1-6 Six Steps

In the dreams of deaf people, communication is often achieved through telepathy

June 3, 2016 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 
RAWSTORY
VAN WINKLE’S
27 MAY 2016

For certain members of the deaf community, dreams are a rare time when communication is easy.

From solar-powered hearing aids to sign language translation devices, today’s deaf community have many tools and options that make communication much simpler than it once was. Nonetheless, during waking hours, being unable to hear in a world driven by sound remains a significant challenge. Lip reading is more difficult and less accurate than popularly believed. And while the use of American Sign Language (ASL) and cued speech has increased, they are still only used by a small fraction of the U.S. population.

But in some dreams, deaf people find they don’t need lip reading or have to worry whether people know sign language. In many of their dreams, everyone knows ASL or communicates through a sort of telepathy where everyone simply knows instantly what everyone else is trying to say.

Read more  . . . Deaf Dreams

Can Industrial Chemical Exposure Cause Hearing Loss?

June 3, 2016 in Hearing Loss & Deafness, Research

 

 

It is important to remember that any chemical that is ototoxic is also likely to be poisonous to the kidneys, because the inner ear and the kidneys arise from the same germ layer during embryonic development.

Occupational Health & Safety
By Robert M. Ghent Jr.
Jun 01, 2016

The short answer to the question in the headline is an unequivocal “yes!” There are industrial chemicals in common use that are ototoxic (poisonous to the ears), meaning that they can damage hearing just as easily as industrial noise. However, simultaneous exposure to noise and ototoxic chemicals is particularly insidious because of their synergistic effect.

In order to illustrate a synergistic relationship, let’s suppose a given noise exposure is responsible for a 10-dB threshold shift. Let’s also suppose that an ototoxic chemical, by itself, can induce a 10-dB threshold shift. If exposure to the noise and ototoxin together results in a 20-dB threshold shift, then we say the combined effect is additive. A synergistic effect, however, is one in which the combined impact of the noise and ototoxin results in a much greater total threshold shift than would be predicted by simply adding together the noise- and ototoxin-related threshold shifts—perhaps a 35- or 40-dB threshold shift may occur. Also, such a threshold shift often impacts a wider range of frequencies. Indeed, a synergistic effect is greater than the sum of its parts, and this observation has been borne out by research involving industrial workers.

Read more  . . . industrial chemicals

Army’s Smart Earplug Damps Explosive Noise, But Can Enhance Whispers

June 3, 2016 in Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

HEALTH NEWS FROM NPR

Heard on  Morning Edition

 

Since 2014, the U.S. Army has gradually been deploying the latest version of a hearing protection system that protects users from loud noises while still letting them hear the world around them.

The system is called TCAPS — Tactical Communication and Protective System — and about 20,000 of the new TCAPS devices have been deployed in the field so far.

Hearing loss is a big problem in the military. According to Defense Department statistics, more than half of all troops returning from Iraq or Afghanistan suffer from some sort of damage to their hearing.

Read more  . .   Smart Earplug

Deaf artists explore new territory at Tower View, Red Wing, Minnesota

June 2, 2016 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

(Red WingMinnesota) Five Deaf Community artists arrive at the Anderson Center this week for a monthlong residency supported by the National Endowment for the Arts.

The five women — writers, artists and a scholar — represent the second artist residency at Tower View for Deaf artists. The NEA awarded a similar grant two years ago for individuals whose native or adoptive language is American Sign Language.

“I am deeply grateful to the NEA for supporting this second residency for Deaf artists,” said Christopher Burawa, executive director of Red Wing’s artist community.

“Two years ago the Anderson Center, under the guidance of Cynthia Weitzel, established the first monthlong artist residency in the country devoted to supporting Deaf artists,” he added.

“This was a groundbreaking event because this community has not received the benefits of the services and resources available to hearing artists.”

Weitzel, a Deaf visual artist, is a year-round studio artist at Tower View. She conceived the program and is overseeing outreach activities as well as a public presentation at the end of the residency.

Read more  . . . Deaf artists

NEW Report Released: Hearing Health Care for Adults: Priorities for Improving Access and Affordability

June 2, 2016 in Community News, Hearing Aids, Hearing Loss & Deafness, Technology, Wearables

 

 

The National Academies Of Sciences, Engineering, & Medicine hearingHealth_cover

Date:  June 2, 2016

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Americans Need Easier Access, More Affordable Options for Hearing Health Care, Says New Report; FDA Should Remove Regulation for Medical Evaluation to Purchase Hearing Aids and Create New Category of Over-the-Counter Hearing Devices 

WASHINGTON – Hearing loss is a significant public health concern, and efforts should be made to provide adults with easier access to and more affordable options for hearing health care, especially for those in underserved and vulnerable populations, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.  The committee that carried out the study and wrote the report called for greater transparency and changes in the cost of hearing health care and expanded treatment options given the number of Americans who have hearing loss and the high cost of hearing health care.  It recommended that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration remove the regulation requiring adults to have a medical evaluation or sign an evaluation waiver to purchase a hearing aid, as well as establish a new category of over-the-counter, wearable hearing devices – separate from hearing aids – that could assist adults with mild to moderate hearing loss.  The report does not address surgical devices, such as cochlear implants, and related services.   Read more  . . . Press Release June 2 

Related Links to report:

Outreach Services, VSDB presents a family event – Where the Wild Things Are!

May 27, 2016 in Community Events, Education & Outreach, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

Outreach Services, VSDB presents a family event – Where the Wild Things Are!
June 18, 2016, 9:30 – 1:00

with collaboration with VA Department of the Blind and Vision Impaired, VA Association of Parents of Children with Visual Impairments, and VA Project for Children and Young Adults with Deaf-Blindness

Join us as the Wildlife Center of Virginia showcases some of their rescued animals, while teaching us about mammals, birds, and reptiles that roam at night! Related fun, educational activities will precede the show, and lunch for all will follow. This activity is open to students ages 4 through 18 who are deaf, hard of hearing, blind or visually impaired and their immediate family members.

Please compete the registration form (linked) and submit it to register your child and family for “Where the Wild Things Are”, June 18, 2016. All attendees must register in advance.

To REGISTER, go to:
http://goo.gl/forms/UzONiKH0fXc7wxfi1

This event will be held in Staunton, VA, and limited to the first 25 students and their families who register. Emails will be sent to let those who register know if they have been confirmed for the event, or if they will be on a waiting list. Questions should be sent to Dr. Debbie Pfeiffer at Debbie.pfeiffer@vsdb.k12.va.us The deadline for receiving registrations is Friday, June 10, 2016.

Questions should be sent to Dr. Debbie Pfeiffer, Director of Outreach Services at debbie.pfeiffer@vsdb.k12.va.us or call 540-414-5249. Thanks! We hope to see you there!

Debbie

DOWNLOAD – Agenda_for_Saturday_June_18

DOWNLOAD – Paper_Registration_Form_&_Agenda

Parents of Deaf Children, Stuck in the Middle of an Argument

May 26, 2016 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

The New York Times
By TINA DONVITO

A long-simmering controversy erupted this spring over how deaf children should communicate.

It started when The Washington Post ran a story on Nyle DiMarco, the deaf “Dancing With the Stars contestant who is also an advocate for American Sign Language (ASL). When Meredith Sugar, president of the Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, retorted that ASL was becoming obsolete in light of better hearing aid and cochlear implant technology, the arguing went public. But that debate was really just the latest manifestation of a longstanding conflict among deaf people and parents of deaf children: Should children be fitted for hearing aids and taught to speak, or should they use sign language? Or a combination of both?

As the parent of a 2-year-old whose hearing loss was recently diagnosed, the arguments only heightened my anxiety about how to address my son Sam’s needs.

Read more  . . . Parents of Deaf Children

Born without hearing, an 11-year-old takes on the National Spelling Bee

May 26, 2016 in Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

Washington Post
By Joe Heim
May 24, 2016

As he walked out of his elementary school last week, fifth-grader Neil Maes heard the clapping from his fellow students lining both sides of the hallways. He heard them cheer and yell his name, and he heard them wish him luck as he headed off to compete in the Scripps National Spelling Bee, which starts Wednesday morning at the Gaylord National Resort and Convention Center in National Harbor, Md.

That the shy 11-year-old from Belton, S.C., can hear anything at all is a testament to technology, to a never-quit attitude and to faith, say his parents, Christy, a preschool teacher, and Peter, an aircraft mechanic.

The Maeses, who found out their son was severely hearing-impaired just days after he was born, have been working nonstop since then to help him have hearing that’s as close to normal as possible.

When the couple learned that their son couldn’t hear, they were in shock.

Read more  . . . Spelling Bee