Hearing Loss & Deafness - Archive

When a HoH Meets a Pro

September 27, 2016 in Advocacy & Access, Hearing Aids, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

THE BETTER HEARING CONSUMER
By Gael Hannan

In the hearing loss world that I live in, there are HoHs and there are Pros:

HoH: Refers to a person who has hearing loss and who may also identify as hard of hearing, hearing-impaired, or hearing aid/cochlear implant user. (This term does not refer to all those affected by a person’s hearing loss, such as the moms and dads, life partners, children, and friends.)

Pro:  Refers to someone who works in a hearing healthcare field, such as an audiologist or hearing instrument specialist, but this category also can include an Ear, Nose & Throat doctor, hearing aid manufacturer, and/or an assistive technology sales rep.

…now that we’ve got that out of the way…

If you’re a HoH, you have most likely—hopefully—met a Pro by now. You made an appointment, walked through that door and sat down to discuss your hearing with this Pro.

Read more  . . . . HOH-PRO

Deaf Influence on Consumer Technology

September 27, 2016 in Hearing Loss & Deafness, Technology

 

 

TheHuffingtonPost.com
by Lydia L. Callis
09/25/2016

When hearing people think about exciting new technologies for those who are deaf, their minds most likely jump to the latest developments in cochlear implants or hearing aids. Or perhaps they may vaguely recall reading about any number of devices being developed to translate sign language into speech (or speech into ASL, or ASL into text). When hearing people think about deafness in general, they tend to think only in terms of “problems” and “solutions.” Luxury technology now forms a cornerstone of our sleek American culture, yet very few innovations seek to enhance — or even consider — the real diversity of the modern user base.

Chris (“Phoenix”) Robinson, who has severe hearing loss in his right ear and is completely deaf in his left, and Brandon (“Zero”) Chan, who is deaf, began their Twitch.tv channel DeafGamersTV with a seemingly simple goal: break down the barrier between deaf and hearing people in the gaming world.

Read more  . . . Deaf Influence

Fairfax County’s ‘Yellow Dot’ Program Could Save Your Life

September 27, 2016 in Community News, Emergency Preparedness, Hearing Loss & Deafness, Transportation

 

 

There’s a “golden hour” after a vehicle crash or emergency.

Medical help may be required, but first responders need to know what medical conditions people might have, especially if they are unconscious or unable to talk.

The Fairfax County Fire and Rescue Department’s new “Yellow Dot Program” could save your life, and enrollment is simple:

  1. Visit your local fire station for a kit.
  2. Fill out the booklet in pencil (so you can make future updates).
  3. Attach a current photo into the booklet.
  4. Place the booklet in your glove compartment.
  5. Place the yellow dot decal in the lower left of your rear windshield to alert first responders to check the glove compartment for vital medical information. Tip: place the sticker no higher than three inches from the bottom.

NVAD Workshop on Medicare: Saturday, Oct. 1

September 27, 2016 in Community Events, Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

Come join us to learn about the ABCs of Medicare! Learn about Low Income Subsidy Programs! Learn how to Protect Yourself from Medicare Fraud!

JulieAnn Chavez Medicare Benefits Specialist

DATE: Saturday, October 1, 2016 10:00AM to 12:00PM
PLACE: Northern Virginia Resource Center (NVRC) 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130 Fairfax, VA 22030

For more information, contact NVAD President Donna Graff-Viall: 571-766-0671 (VP) or missgraffie@gmail.com (email)

DOWNLOAD – nvad-workshop_saturday-october-1-2016

10-Minute Online Survey on Home Alerting Devices for People who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

September 22, 2016 in Community News, Emergency Preparedness, Research

 

The Technology Access Program (TAP) at Gallaudet University is conducting a brief online survey to learn about the types of alerting devices deaf and hard of hearing people might prefer to notify them to common sounds around the home (doorbell ringing, videophone call, baby crying, etc.), and emergency alerts (fire alarms, emergency weather alerts, etc.). Your responses to this short survey will help us in the development of better notification options for these common sounds and emergency alerts.

To take this survey you must be 18 years or older.

The Gallaudet Institutional Review Board has approved this study. If you have any questions about the study, please contact Christian Vogler Christian.vogler@gallaudet.edu or Paula Tucker paula.tucker@gallaudet.edu.

Please click http://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/2997929/Home-alerting-devices-Internet-Version to begin the survey.

The survey will close on October 31, 2016.

Rate of hearing loss increases significantly after age 90

September 22, 2016 in Hearing Aids, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

Hearing aids underused, say authors

Science Daily
Date:
September 19, 2016
Source:
JAMA
Summary:
A new study examined if the rate of age-related hearing loss is constant in the older old (80 years and older). Scientists concluded that hearing loss rapidly accelerates over the age of 90. Furthermore, authors suggest that hearing aids are underused in this population.
In a study published online by JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Anil K. Lalwani, M.D., of the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, and colleagues examined if the rate of age-related hearing loss is constant in the older old (80 years and older).
Read more  . . . hearing loss  . . . after age 90

Inauguration of Gallaudet’s 11th & first deaf woman president, Roberta J. Cordano – Friday, Sept. 30th

September 15, 2016 in Community Events, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

Friday, September 30

Inauguration of Gallaudet’s 11th and first deaf woman president, Roberta J. Cordano

Installation of Roberta J. Cordano, J.D.
3:30 p.m.
Gallaudet Field House

Keynote speakers:
Liisa Kauppinen,
 H-’98, Honorary President, World Federation of the Deaf
Frank Wu, J.D. Distinguished Professor, University of California Hastings College of the Law, Author and Advocate

The overflow location is in Elstad Auditorium

RSVP Information for Inauguration Community Celebration

All inauguration week activities are open to the campus community, alumni, and friends of the University. No tickets are required. RSVPs are requested for the Inauguration Community Celebration on Friday night to get an accurate count for refreshments and interpretation services. Click here to RSVP.

Inauguration will be streamed live. (Check following website for link)

More information on Gallaudet University Website:
http://www.gallaudet.edu/inauguration.html

 

How To Enjoy A Barbecue With Hearing Loss

August 31, 2016 in Hearing Aids, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

Huffington Post
Shari Eberts 
08/31/2016

I love summer barbecue parties — Memorial Day Weekend, Fourth of July, or just a regular summer weekend. It is fun to gather friends and family to enjoy the summer weather, each other’s company and the casual fare. Parties can be a challenge for people with hearing loss, but barbecues are some of the easiest to navigate. Barbecues are typically outside so the noise doesn’t bounce around the room the way it can at indoor events. Being outdoors also often creates a variety of socializing spots — some might even be relatively quiet! So head to a barbecue this weekend — or host one of your own.

Zika outbreak: hearing loss found in 6% of Brazilian babies in study

August 31, 2016 in Hearing Loss & Deafness, Research

 

 

Other viral infections during pregnancy can also cause hearing loss

CBC NEWS – Health
Thomson Reuters

Aug 30, 2016

A study in Brazil of 70 babies whose mothers had confirmed Zika infections found that nearly 6 per cent had hearing loss, adding a new complication to the list of ills the virus can cause when women are infected during pregnancy.

The Brazilian study, published on Tuesday in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s weekly report on
death and disease
, confirmed less rigorous reports of deafness among infants born to mothers with Zika infections.

Read more  . . . Zika and Hearing Loss

So if Beethoven was completely deaf, how did he compose?

August 18, 2016 in Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

Classic FM
The worlds Greatest Music
By Rob Weinberg,
17th August 2016

Ludwig was still pumping out the masterpieces – even when he was completely deaf. Here’s how he did it.

“For the last three years my hearing has grown steadily weaker…” – so wrote Beethoven, aged 30, in a letter to a friend.

The young Beethoven was known as the most important musician since Mozart. By his mid-20s, he had studied with Haydn and was celebrated as a brilliant, virtuoso pianist.

Beethoven’s life timeline: 1770 – 1802 >

By the time he turned 30 he had composed a couple of piano concertos, six string quartets, and his first symphony. Everything was looking pretty good for the guy, with the prospect of a long, successful career ahead.

Then, he started to notice a buzzing sound in his ears  . . .

Read more  . . . Beethoven

It takes teamwork: mainstreaming kids with hearing loss

August 18, 2016 in Advocacy & Access, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

Healthy Hearing
Contributed by Lisa Packer, staff writer, Healthy Hearing
Thursday, August 18th, 2016

Since the passage of the Individuals with Disabilities in Education Act (IDEA) in 1975, the number of children mainstreamed into public schools with hearing loss has increased dramatically. About 75 percent of children with hearing loss are now mainstreamed into public schools, and about half of those children spend the majority of the day in a “hearing” classroom.

When it comes to meeting the educational needs of a child who is deaf or has hearing loss, there are many different professionals who play a part in their success.

Read more  . . . teamwork

 

Northern Virginia Tinnitus Support Group – Kickoff Session – Sept 20th

August 11, 2016 in Community News, Tinnitus

 

Join our Kickoff Session:
Northern Virginia Tinnitus Support Group

Date:        Tuesday, September 20, 2016 at 7PM
Location: Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf & Hard of Hearing Persons

3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130
Fairfax, VA 22030

Directions to NVRC:  http://www.nvrc.org/about/directions/

Share your personal experiences
Coping strategies
Symptom triggers
Management techniques
Current Treatment options

The Future ….

For additional information, please contact:

Elaine Wolfson, erwolfson@comcast.net
Marian Patey, mjpatey@fcps.edu
Debbie Jones, djones@nvrc.org

Captioned – Assistive Listening Device Presentation at Greenspring Village

August 11, 2016 in Hearing Aids, Hearing Loss & Deafness, Technology

 

Assistive Listening Device captioned video presentation at the Greenspring Community , Springfield , VA.

Presenters include NVRC’s Debbie Jones, Resource and Technology Specialist and Bonnie O’Leary, Certified Hearing Loss Support Specialist, Outreach Manager

Produced at Greenspring Community – EricksonLiving.com‎

Published on Jul 25, 2016

Directed and Produced by Diane Gatsis Havinga

 

I can’t always lip-read you, and please stop shouting

August 9, 2016 in Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

MUNKYMIND
by J. Parrish Lewis
Mar 1, 2016

Here’s the problem when I write about anything regarding deaf-centered topics: you might assume that we’re all the same and that what applies to me applies to everyone else that’s deaf. This isn’t the case.

So. This is a post that’s going to have a disclaimer: What I have to say isn’t necessarily true for the next deaf person you meet, and the next. And the next. But, it just might be.

Rather than get you to draw this visual image in your mind, like a textbook graphic with labels and whatnot, of a deaf person, I’d like you to start practicing letting go of certain assumptions about us. Approach us with a little more understanding of possibilities. You can fill in the blanks after you’ve met each person, using cues from each person. Let us be your guide to our own selves.

Read more . . . stop shouting

10 Tips for Music Appreciation With a Cochlear Implant

August 9, 2016 in Hearing Loss & Deafness, Technology

 

 

An a cappella singer and bilateral implant recipient, Keri Reynolds understands how important music appreciation is for many cochlear implant recipients. Prepared with patience and positivity, Keri began the journey of relearning how to appreciate music. Keri is part of the MED-EL USA Team and shares with us her personal top tips for music appreciation with a cochlear implant.

“Music shaped my world and adds listening beauty. It is truly the stuff of life.”

As a cochlear implant user for over 10 years, some of the most frequently asked questions I receive from new and existing CI recipients are: “What about music?” “Does music sound like you remember?” “Does it sound good?” I suppose recipients ask these questions because music is so much a part of who we are. It seems that whenever music starts, we involuntarily respond with foot tapping, fingers snapping, and hands clapping. We react because we enjoy it and music moves us to join in.

Read more . . . Music Appreciation