Hearing Loss & Deafness - Archive

So if Beethoven was completely deaf, how did he compose?

August 18, 2016 in Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

Classic FM
The worlds Greatest Music
By Rob Weinberg,
17th August 2016

Ludwig was still pumping out the masterpieces – even when he was completely deaf. Here’s how he did it.

“For the last three years my hearing has grown steadily weaker…” – so wrote Beethoven, aged 30, in a letter to a friend.

The young Beethoven was known as the most important musician since Mozart. By his mid-20s, he had studied with Haydn and was celebrated as a brilliant, virtuoso pianist.

Beethoven’s life timeline: 1770 – 1802 >

By the time he turned 30 he had composed a couple of piano concertos, six string quartets, and his first symphony. Everything was looking pretty good for the guy, with the prospect of a long, successful career ahead.

Then, he started to notice a buzzing sound in his ears  . . .

Read more  . . . Beethoven

It takes teamwork: mainstreaming kids with hearing loss

August 18, 2016 in Advocacy & Access, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

Healthy Hearing
Contributed by Lisa Packer, staff writer, Healthy Hearing
Thursday, August 18th, 2016

Since the passage of the Individuals with Disabilities in Education Act (IDEA) in 1975, the number of children mainstreamed into public schools with hearing loss has increased dramatically. About 75 percent of children with hearing loss are now mainstreamed into public schools, and about half of those children spend the majority of the day in a “hearing” classroom.

When it comes to meeting the educational needs of a child who is deaf or has hearing loss, there are many different professionals who play a part in their success.

Read more  . . . teamwork

 

Northern Virginia Tinnitus Support Group – Kickoff Session – Sept 20th

August 11, 2016 in Community News, Tinnitus

 

Join our Kickoff Session:
Northern Virginia Tinnitus Support Group

Date:        Tuesday, September 20, 2016 at 7PM
Location: Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf & Hard of Hearing Persons

3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130
Fairfax, VA 22030

Directions to NVRC:  http://www.nvrc.org/about/directions/

Share your personal experiences
Coping strategies
Symptom triggers
Management techniques
Current Treatment options

The Future ….

For additional information, please contact:

Elaine Wolfson, erwolfson@comcast.net
Marian Patey, mjpatey@fcps.edu
Debbie Jones, djones@nvrc.org

Captioned – Assistive Listening Device Presentation at Greenspring Village

August 11, 2016 in Hearing Aids, Hearing Loss & Deafness, Technology

 

Assistive Listening Device captioned video presentation at the Greenspring Community , Springfield , VA.

Presenters include NVRC’s Debbie Jones, Resource and Technology Specialist and Bonnie O’Leary, Certified Hearing Loss Support Specialist, Outreach Manager

Produced at Greenspring Community – EricksonLiving.com‎

Published on Jul 25, 2016

Directed and Produced by Diane Gatsis Havinga

 

I can’t always lip-read you, and please stop shouting

August 9, 2016 in Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

MUNKYMIND
by J. Parrish Lewis
Mar 1, 2016

Here’s the problem when I write about anything regarding deaf-centered topics: you might assume that we’re all the same and that what applies to me applies to everyone else that’s deaf. This isn’t the case.

So. This is a post that’s going to have a disclaimer: What I have to say isn’t necessarily true for the next deaf person you meet, and the next. And the next. But, it just might be.

Rather than get you to draw this visual image in your mind, like a textbook graphic with labels and whatnot, of a deaf person, I’d like you to start practicing letting go of certain assumptions about us. Approach us with a little more understanding of possibilities. You can fill in the blanks after you’ve met each person, using cues from each person. Let us be your guide to our own selves.

Read more . . . stop shouting

10 Tips for Music Appreciation With a Cochlear Implant

August 9, 2016 in Hearing Loss & Deafness, Technology

 

 

An a cappella singer and bilateral implant recipient, Keri Reynolds understands how important music appreciation is for many cochlear implant recipients. Prepared with patience and positivity, Keri began the journey of relearning how to appreciate music. Keri is part of the MED-EL USA Team and shares with us her personal top tips for music appreciation with a cochlear implant.

“Music shaped my world and adds listening beauty. It is truly the stuff of life.”

As a cochlear implant user for over 10 years, some of the most frequently asked questions I receive from new and existing CI recipients are: “What about music?” “Does music sound like you remember?” “Does it sound good?” I suppose recipients ask these questions because music is so much a part of who we are. It seems that whenever music starts, we involuntarily respond with foot tapping, fingers snapping, and hands clapping. We react because we enjoy it and music moves us to join in.

Read more . . . Music Appreciation

How New York City Hears People With Hearing Loss

August 9, 2016 in Advocacy & Access, Hearing Loss & Deafness, Technology

 

 

FORBES
By Janice Schacter Lintz
AUG 8, 2016

New York City is the most accessible city in the country for people with hearing loss. Hearing access is available at many of the city’s Broadway theaters, museums, and stadiums. Even the subway information booths/call boxes as well as the new Taxis of Tomorrow have hearing access. The degree of access available varies by site, so check the individual websites for specific details.

A hearing induction loop permits a person with a telecoil-equipped hearing aid or cochlear implant to use the T-setting to hear the sound directly from the microphone through the hearing aid/implant—no receiver is needed. Background noise is blocked on the T-setting. The other types of assistive listening systems, FM and infrared, require the use of a receiver (a headset or body-worn device); telecoil users can plug in a neck loop.

Read more  . . . New York City

20 QUESTIONS & 5 STEPS TO A BETTER LIFE WITH HEARING LOSS – By Gael Hannan

August 4, 2016 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

The Better Hearing Consumer
By Gael Hannan
Don’t you just love those headlines that promise you the world?

5 Simple Tricks You Can Do TODAY to Revive Your Love Life!
10 Things You Didn’t Know About Celery—But Should!
3 Neat Ways to Pick the 5 People You’ll Meet Up There!

These are examples of a listicle—a combination of an article and a list which offers advice to help you solve a problem, make you a better person, or make you prettier, smarter, richer or all three at one go.  Writers like listicles because using bullet points means less grammar and punctuation to worry about.  Readers like them because it’s about their problemgetting to the point without a lot of yah-de-ya-da (which is what you’re reading right now).

Read more  . . . 20 QUESTIONS & 5 STEPS

Pakistan – Coke Studio used technology and created music for the deaf

August 4, 2016 in Advocacy & Access, Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

TECH Juice – Pakistan
By Muneeb Ahmad
August 2, 2016

Ahead of the launch of Coke Studio’s Season 9, Coca-Cola has partnered with Deaf Reach Schools and Training Center to make history and has created music for the deaf or the people with some kind of hearing impairment. Advanced technologies are being employed to create an environment for the deaf community allowing them to feel what it actually is like to hear music.

The initiative titled as “Coke Studio for the Deaf”, was launched by Coke Studio just recently. In a bid to provide music to ‘everyone’, Coca-Cola created Coke Studio for the 9 million people in Pakistan bearing a full or partial hearing loss.

Read more  . . . See captioned / translated video

The Remarkable Tech Bringing the Deaf and Hearing Worlds Together

July 28, 2016 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness, Technology

 

 

WIRED -BUSINESS
By MATT SIMON.
MATT SIMON
June 27, 2016

THE PIZZERIA’S PHONE rings, but it doesn’t make a sound.
Instead, on the shelf below, green lights flash. Waiters scurry by. A few paces away, a cook with a big wooden paddle shoves pizzas into a bulbous oven. The lights flash again, and Melody Stein picks up.

“Hi, this is Melody from Mozzeria,” she says. “OK, sure thing. What would you like to order?”

Melody is deaf. As are the waiters and the cooks. Yet any one of them can communicate with a hearing person over the phone.

Call Mozzeria and the system will route you, the hearing person, to an interpreter at a “video relay service.” The interpreter listens to what you say and signs it to Melody, who’s watching on the restaurant’s iPad. Then the interpreter speaks Melody’s response back to you. Back and forth, until you’ve placed your order or made your reservation. And if you don’t find that to be absolutely marvelous, then, well, I don’t know what to tell you.

Read more . . . Watch captioned/ signed Video . . . Mozzeria

 

SoundSense is a simple, open-source gadget that helps deaf people

July 28, 2016 in Hearing Loss & Deafness, Technology

 

 

Furenexo’s SoundSense is a simple, open-source gadget that helps deaf people stay aware of their surroundings

Tech Crunch
Posted 
by Devin Coldewey, Contributor

People with deafness have plenty of ways to navigate everyday situations as if they had no disability at all, but there are still situations that present dangers unique to them — not being able to hear a smoke alarm or gunshot, for instance. SoundSense is a small wearable device that listens for noises that might require immediate attention and alerts the user when it detects one.

“There’s really been an absence of innovation in technology for disabilities over the last decade or even decades,” said Brian Goral, co-founder and CEO of Furenexo, the company behind SoundSense. We talked a few weeks before today’s launch. “What we’re looking to do is bring technology that’s taken for granted, things like cell phones and driverless cars, and apply that to the disability space.”

This first device is small and simple for a reason — the company is bootstrapped and has to rely on Kickstarter for the funds to make the SoundSense. They’re also looking for grants from non-profit entities and perhaps government funds.

Read More  . . . . SoundSense

Related Links:

motherboard.vice.com

 

Auditory cortex nearly identical in hearing and deaf people

July 21, 2016 in Research

 

Study shows architecture of audition likely based on innate factors

Harvard Gazette
By Peter Reuell, Harvard Staff Writer
July 18, 2016

The neural architecture in the auditory cortex — the part of the brain that processes sound — is virtually identical in profoundly deaf and hearing people, a new study has found.

The study raises a host of new questions about the role of experience in processing sensory information, and could point the way toward potential new avenues for intervention in deafness. The study is described in a June 18 paper published in Scientific Reports.

The paper was written by Ella Striem-Amit, a postdoctoral researcher in Alfonso Caramazza’s Cognitive Neuropsychology Laboratory at Harvard, Mario Belledonne from Harvard, Jorge Almeida from the University of Coimbra, and Quanjing Chen, Yuxing Fang, Zaizhu Han, and Yanchao Bi from Beijing Normal University.

Read more  . . . auditory cortex

Tuning in to deaf needs

July 7, 2016 in Hearing Loss & Deafness, Research

 

 

SCIENCE
By Jyoti Madhusoodanan

Peter Hauser Photo Credit: M. Benjamin

Peter Hauser Photo Credit: M. Benjamin

It’s a team sport, but indoor polo doesn’t take much talking—which helped make it an instant fit for Peter Hauser. During his freshman year of college, a few horse hours were a weekly routine: polo three times a week, together with training ponies or coaching local students in the sport. But Hauser had a stronger motivation than his love of the game: The horses didn’t expect him to hear them.

At the age of 5, a bout of spinal meningitis left Hauser completely deaf. While in middle school, he attempted to use cochlear implants—considered an experimental treatment at the time—but the prosthetics proved ineffective. The procedures and monitoring nonetheless had an upside: They provided his earliest experiences working with researchers, which helped him become interested in pursuing science himself.

Hauser had a longstanding interest in human psychology. As a deaf student, however, he didn’t think he could work with people as research subjects, so he chose to major in animal sciences instead. But when his advanced courses proved challenging, he began taking evening sign language classes at a community college so that he could use an interpreter to keep up—he had relied on lip-reading up to that point—and the decision was life-changing.

Read Article  . . . Tuning in to deaf needs

New book provides insight into diagnosis & research of hereditary hearing loss

July 7, 2016 in Hearing Loss & Deafness, Research

 

 

News-Medical
July 7, 2016

Genetics of Deafness offers a journey through areas crucial for understanding the causes and effects of hearing loss. It covers such topics as the latest approaches in diagnostics and deafness research and the current status and future promise of gene therapy for hearing restoration. The book begins by bringing attention to how hearing loss affects the individual and society. Methods of hearing loss detection and management throughout the lifespan are highlighted as is a particularly new development in newborn hearing screening. The challenges of hearing loss, an extremely heterogeneous impairment, are addressed.  Read more . . . Genetics of Deafness 

Publisher – http://www.karger.com/

Testicular cancer survivors may have hearing loss after cisplatin therapy, study shows

July 5, 2016 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness, Research

 

 

Science Daily
Date: June 27, 2016

Source: Indiana University

Summary: Many testicular cancer survivors experience hearing loss after cisplatin-based chemotherapy, according to researchers who studied, for the first time, the cumulative effects of cisplatin-based chemotherapy on hearing levels in testicular cancer survivors through comprehensive audiometry measurements. They found that increasing doses of cisplatin were associated with increased hearing loss at most of the tested frequencies, involving 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 kHz.

Read more  . . .  Study Shows