Hearing Loss & Deafness - Archive

SIU professor studies using chili peppers to help prevent hearing loss

August 28, 2014 in Hearing Loss & Deafness, Research

 

 

The Southern – Illinoisan
August 21, 2014
Article Source

SPRINGFIELD — A physician researcher at SIU School of Medicine has been awarded a five-year federal grant from the National Institute of Deafness and Communication Disorders of the National Institutes of Health to continue his studies of how to reduce hearing loss in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy treatment.

The current research project will examine whether capsaicin, a component of hot chili peppers, can reduce hearing loss and kidney damage if given prior to or after a dose of cisplatin, an anti-cancer drug frequently used for chemotherapy. Read more . . . →

Rail boss goes deaf for a day

August 26, 2014 in Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

Buck Free Press, UKChilternRail
Aug. 24,2014
by Neil Phillips
Article Source

THE managing director of Chiltern Railways went deaf for a day after being challenged by a Saunderton-based charity to experience the train service his company provided – both with and without the help of a hearing dog.

Rob Brighouse agreed to the gauntlet set down by Hearing Dogs for Deaf People and travelled to and from London Marylebone after having gel moulds inserted into his ears.

These gave him a temporary 60per cent hearing loss which he said immediately gave him the experience of the sudden effects of deafness, leaving him feeling isolated and out of control.

He said: “As soon as the gels were in my ears, I felt cut off from everyone around me. I knew that people were having a conversation, but I had no idea what they were talking about. I’ve become accustomed to the everyday sounds of the hustle and bustle at London Marylebone station, but suddenly everything around me was silent. I had lost completely control of the situation, I felt isolated and alone.”

Read more  . . .

The Best Books for Kids with Hearing Loss

August 26, 2014 in Families, Hearing Loss & Deafness

HubPages.com

Finding great books about children who are deaf or hard of hearing can be difficult. Many books are out of date with current technology, or are targeted to an adult audience. As the mother to a five year old boy who wears hearing aids, I was disappointed to find outdated books about hearing loss in our local library. One book described a boy as having “weird words” and another featured a girl wearing an outdated body-worn hearing aid system from the 1970′s. Fortunately, there are many new, wonderful books that explore current technology and provide a positive outlook for children with hearing loss. Books with an auditory/verbal approach (containing references to hearing aids, cochlear implants, and “learning to listen”) are listed in the first section. Books about ASL and Deaf culture are listed in the second section. See listed books

(AAMHL) is establishing hearing-accessible hand chime clinics – NVRC 9/13

August 26, 2014 in Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

Have you ever been shut out of musical ensembles because you had a hearing loss?
Would you like to learn to play in a musical ensemble?
Do you want to learn more about how instrumental music works?

If you answered “YES” to any of the above questions, our handchime clinics are for you!
Read more . . . →

Link found between hearing loss and cognitive health

August 21, 2014 in Hearing Loss & Deafness, Research

 

 

For News-Herald Media
August 18, 2014

Difficulty hearing may be more than just a quality-of-life issue. Growing evidence indicates that untreated hearing loss in older adults can lead to other health conditions, and one of the most concerning is cognitive decline.

In fact, a Johns Hopkins Study found that cognitive diminishment was 41 percent more likely in seniors with hearing loss. Because maintaining the health of the brain is such a priority for older people, hearing difficulties should not be ignored.

Hearing and the brain

To hear well, the brain and ears work together. Sound is heard through the ears, and then the brain translates the noise so you can understand what it is. This means you not only hear language, music and traffic, but you comprehend these are all different sounds with different meanings.

With untreated hearing loss, the signals to your brain are weaker, and therefore you have to think much harder to understand the noises around you. When the brain is using more cognitive resources to understand sounds, other brain activities like memory and comprehension can suffer, often causing cognitive decline.

Effects of untreated hearing loss

In addition to diminished mental health, untreated hearing loss can lead to numerous health conditions: mental fatigue and stress, poor memory, concentration difficulty, social withdrawal and depression.

Read more . . .

Foundation seeks to teach young people about hearing loss epidemic

August 21, 2014 in Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

Miami Herald
Tuesday, 08.19.14
BY ANA VECIANA-SUAREZ
AVECIANA-SUAREZ@MIAMIHERALD.COM

Three years ago, when the noise level at the American Airlines Arena shrieked to a deafening level, fan Adele Sandberg covered her ears and winced. Intent on the fast-paced court action, she didn’t yet know about the growing danger of hearing loss. She didn’t know yet that preventing it would become her passion.

But with the cheers and the loudspeaker announcements still echoing in her ears, Sandberg returned home to North Miami Beach and began researching hearing loss. What she discovered shocked her: One of five U.S. teenagers suffers from some form of noise-induced hearing loss by the age of 19. And more than 50 percent of U.S. high school students have reported at least one symptom of hearing loss, such as ringing in the ears.

The problem is getting worse. One study concluded that the proportion of second graders with some form of hearing loss had doubled in the past 10 years, while the proportion of eighth graders had quadrupled.

“We have an epidemic of hearing loss, and I don’t say this lightly,” said Sandberg, 70. “A lot of people suffer from this but don’t know it because it’s so gradual. And once it happens, it’s irreversible.”

Read more . . .

Coverage For Bone-Anchored Hearing Devices To End ?

August 21, 2014 in Advocacy & Access, Disability Law, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

AG Bell Learn

Thursday, August 21, 2014 / ListeningandSpokenLanguage.org

On July 11, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) proposed a new rule that would reclassify bone-anchored implants (i.e., osseointegrated hearing implants) from a prosthetic device to a hearing aid. This would effectively end Medicare reimbursement, since hearing aids are not covered under Medicare.

If the rule is adopted, it will affect thousands of people who do not benefit from hearing aids and people who need to replace or update their bone-anchored implant. The proposed changes threaten to eliminate what may be the best—and only—option for individuals with microtia, atresia, conductive hearing losses and single-sided deafness. Click here and here for more background and information.

There are only 10 days left to submit comments to CMS on the proposed rule! The comment period ends on September 2, and the final ruling by CMS is expected sometime around November 1. Click here to submit comments. Click here for guidance on comment submission for professionals, candidates, recipients, caregivers and supporters.

 

NIDCD Scientists Advance Understanding of Molecules in Deafness Genes, Head & Neck Cancers

August 14, 2014 in Research

 

 

NIH-NID

August 12, 2014

NIDCD Scientists Advance Understanding of Molecules in Deafness Genes, Head & Neck Cancers

NIH Researchers Characterize Elusive Myosin 15, Protein Linked to a Form of Hereditary Hearing Loss

NIH researchers report that they have purified a key part of myosin 15, a molecular motor protein that helps build healthy hearing structures in the inner ear. Mutations in the myosin 15 gene (MYO15A) have been linked to a form of hereditary deafness in humans. Using a novel approach to express the protein, researchers have revealed the first detailed insight into the molecule’s structure and function, laying the foundation for new treatments for some forms of hearing loss. The new approach to expressing myosin 15 may also help the study of other types of myosin motors, such as skeletal and cardiac muscle myosins, which could accelerate development of targeted drug therapies for heart disease and other health conditions. The study was published online August 11 in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Read more »

Researchers Find Molecular Similarities Among Head and Neck, Lung, and Bladder Cancers

Researchers at the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD), one of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), working as part of a team of scientists with The Cancer Genome Atlas Network, have identified a characteristic molecular pattern shared by head and neck, lung, and some bladder cancers. The molecular profile offers information that could help physicians diagnose and develop new treatment strategies for these diseases. The results of the study appeared online August 7 in the journal Cell. Read more »

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Metamorphosis! Big Apple Circus’ Circus of the Senses – 10/1 free

August 7, 2014 in Advocacy & Access, Community Events, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

October 1st 11 am Dulles Town Center

http://www.bigapplecircus.org/circus-of-the-senses

apply Now for Tickets! Deadline September 5, 2014

View this original announcement 

2014 Circus of the Senses Dulles Towne Center!
October 1, 2014 at 11 am
Apply on line NOW for your free tickets!

BigAppleCircus

Created in 1987, Circus of the Senses is a slightly modified version of the Big Apple Circus specifically adapted for guests with vision, hearing or cognitive challenges. Through the use of assistive technologies, modified sensory input and ASL interpreters, Circus of the Senses provides an exciting multi-dimensional performing arts experience for those with special needs! Enjoy the Show!

Copyright © 2014 Big Apple Circus, All rights reserved. You are receiving this because you have enjoyed the Big Apple Circus’ Circus of the Senses and we wish you a Happy New Year. Our mailing address is: Big Apple Circus 1 metrotech center north 3rd fl brooklyn, NY 11201

CODA Pride – YouTube Video

August 5, 2014 in Community News, Families, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

CODA Pride is a documentary about Children of Deaf Adults, our relationships, our experiences, and our proud bilingual community. The video was created by Rachael and Jacob Baer who are both CODA’s. 
 

Cochlear Implant Also Uses Gene Therapy to Improve Hearing

August 1, 2014 in Research, Technology

 

 

MIT Technology Review
By Katherine Bourzac
Article Source

The electrodes in a cochlear implant can be used to direct gene therapy and regrow neurons.

Researchers have demonstrated a new way to restore lost hearing: with a cochlear implant that helps the auditory nerve regenerate by delivering gene therapy.

The researchers behind the work are investigating whether electrode-triggered gene therapy could improve other machine-body connections—for example, the deep-brain stimulation probes that are used to treat Parkinson’s disease, or retinal prosthetics.

More than 300,000 people worldwide have cochlear implants. The devices are implanted in patients who are profoundly deaf, having lost most or all of the ear’s hair cells, which detect sound waves through mechanical vibrations, and convert those vibrations into electrical signals that are picked up by neurons in the auditory nerve and passed along to the brain. Cochlear implants use up to 22 platinum electrodes to stimulate the auditory nerve; the devices make a tremendous difference for people but they restore only a fraction of normal hearing.

“Cochlear implants are very effective for picking up speech, but they struggle to reproduce pitch, spectral range, and dynamics,” says Gary Housley, a neuroscientist at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia, who led development of the new implant.

Read more . . .

“My hearing loss has never held me back in music.”
Meet Eloise Garland

August 1, 2014 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

The Limping Chicken, United Kingdom
Deaf news and deaf blogs from the UK! Lays eggs every weekday
Article Source

Tell us about yourself.
I’m nineteen years old, moderately deaf, and I’m currently studying in London for a music degree.

I like anything creative and arty, and enjoy going to cultural events and exhibitions where historical artifacts are shown (very easy to get to when you live in London!).

I am also highly involved with helping to raise self esteem amongst deaf young people.

Eloise Garland

How did you cope with being deaf and progressing in music?
My hearing loss has never really held me back with my music as it’s something I love doing, though I admit that I wouldn’t be able to it without my hearing aids.

Although I play violin and piano, voice is my primary study at university. By using hearing aids and working with my singing teacher to ‘feel’ where notes are placed, I can really make the most of my hearing.

It was partly determination and partly being told I was capable of doing things by my parents and teachers that got me to where I am now, and I hope to pass that attitude and level of encouragement on to other people.

It’s important to realise that music can be made accessible to anyone as long as they’re given the right opportunities and are encouraged to have an ‘I can’ outlook on life.

You use a device to help you. Tell us what difference it makes?
Yes, I use a new system made by Phonak (a supporter of this site) called Roger. The system consists of a Roger Pen (a transmitter with a microphone which literally looks like a pen), and receivers attached to my hearing aids.

In university, for instance, a lecturer can hang the pen around their neck, and their voice will be sent directly to my hearing aids.

I can also plug it into the computer, my iPod, the TV, or connect it to my iPhone via Bluetooth so that voices or media sources are also directly streamed from the transmitter to the receivers.

I also now use another mic with the system, which is a smaller and more basic clip-on mic.

Two ears are better than one

August 1, 2014 in Hearing Loss & Deafness, Research

 

 

Medical Press, Australia
by Anne Rahilly
Article Source

Hearing-impaired children fitted with a second cochlear implant (CI) early in life, have significantly better outcomes in aspects of their communication and learning.

A five-year research study from the University of Melbourne shows that bilateral  implantation resulted in improved language, social development, and academic outcomes for children.

Lead researcher, Dr Julia Sarant from the Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology said there are improved learning outcomes as well as, community cost benefits and greatly improved quality of life for hearing-impaired children.

“Children in this study with bilateral CIs developed vocabulary and spoken language significantly faster than children with only one CI. This has enormous implications for their long-term future,” she said.

Severe-profound congenital hearing loss is a significant cost to society. In 2005, specialised education cost on average $25,000 per child, loss of productivity cost $6.7 billion, and social security benefits were paid to approximately 129,000 individuals who were unemployed due to hearing loss

The study was conducted across Victoria, NSW, Qld, SA, and New Zealand, involving cochlear implant clinics and early intervention centres with over 160 children.

Recently, the NZ Health Department recommended a change of the current federal funding policy in favour of having all hearing-impaired  under the age of six years fitted with bilateral implants.

“I was asked to consult with policy makers in NZ and I am pleased they have noted these findings and made the appropriate changes,” said Dr Sarant.

 

Inspirational deaf dancer Macy Baez going for hip hop gold in US

August 1, 2014 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

Illawarra Mecury, Australia
By LISA WACHSMUTH

July 22, 2014
Article Source

Born profoundly deaf, Albion Park hip hop dancer Macy Baez doesn’t hear the beat of the music the same as the rest of her crew, rather she “feels the music”.

The 14-year-old is part of Crew Illagroovers, a young dance troupe that will jet off to the United States next week to represent Australia in an international hip hop competition.

Macy’s drive and talent has inspired many, including NSW Minister for Disability Services John Ajaka, who on Tuesday presented the crew from Street Beatz Hip Hop studio with a $5000 cheque to help them on their way.

“Macy is one determined little individual. It was my honour to meet her and help her get one step closer to the United States to dance,” he said. “… Macy is a great role model for all young people with disability.”

The Dapto High School student, who has bilateral Cochlear implants, said she was thrilled to be able to compete on a global stage.

The crew of seven, aged from 12 to 14, will compete in the varsity section of the World Hip Hop Championships in Las Vegas from August 4 to 10 and Macy is going for gold.

“I’m going there to win,” she said. “I’m very excited, and a bit nervous, but I love competing because it’s a lot of fun and it has a serious side too.”

Not only has Macy’s dancing improved since she started lessons six years ago, so has her hearing.

“I have to listen hard for the beat,” she said. “I feel it before I hear it.”

Pit bull saves deaf teen from house fire

July 31, 2014 in Families, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

‘Ace’ licked the face of sleeping teen to alert him to fire

A teen is alive thanks to the family’s pit bull, who woke him up from a nap when his house caught fire.

Nick Lamb, 13, who was born deaf, was home alone and sleeping without his hearing aids when the fire began, reports The Associated Press and WXIN. Indianapolis Fire Department Capt. Rita Reith says Lamb was unable to hear the smoke alarms going off.

Read more