Technology - Archive

FCC Still Accepting Nominations for Chairman’s Awards

March 26, 2014 in Advocacy & Access, Technology

FCC Accepting Nominations for Chairman’s Awards for Advancement in Accessibility; Deadline Is April 15

by: Jamal Mazrui, Deputy Director, Accessibility and Innovation Initiative

March 21, 2014

*The deadline for nominations for Chairman’s AAA has been extended from March 31 to April 15. This blog post has been edited to reflect the deadline change.

One of the most cherished missions of the FCC is helping to bridge the accessibility gap in communications technologies. Entrusted by Congress with various regulatory responsibilities intended to raise the baseline level of accessibility found in communication technologies and advanced services enabled by the Internet, the FCC in recent years has developed additional non-regulatory approaches to buoy its efforts to achieve these goals. To that end, the Accessibility and Innovation (A&I) Initiative was created to promote collaborative problem-solving on accessibility among academic, industry, consumer and government sectors.  A signature project of the A&I Initiative is the Chairman’s Awards for Advancement in Accessibility (Chairman’s AAA) to recognize innovators for contributions to accessible technology.

Learn more  . . .

Smart Bulb ‘could prove revolutionary’ for deaf people

March 26, 2014 in Technology

By Alex Herh, 3/24/14

LG’s smart bulb blinks when users get phone calls – and could change smartphone use for people with hearing problems

A new “smart lightbulb” from LG could open up smartphone usage amongst people with hearing problems.

The South Korean company’s Smart Bulb is an LED lightbulb with WiFi and Bluetooth connectivity. Like all LED bulbs, it’s extremely long-lasting, with the company rating them for more than a decade. It also uses very little power: energy savings are around 80% compared to traditional incandescent bulbs.

Read More . . .

Access Interpreting, Inc. Introduces Video Remote Interpreting for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Community

March 21, 2014 in Community News, Technology

 

(PRWEB) March 11, 2014

Today Access Interpreting, Inc. is excited to announce the official roll-out this week of its new Video Remote Interpreting (VRI) service for the Deaf and hard of hearing community. With the introduction of VRI, Access is able to provide increased sign language interpreting services to consumers throughout the United States.

 

Access Interpreting, Inc., the premier sign-language interpreting and communication access services agency, today announced the launch of its highly anticipated new Video Remote Interpreting service.

With the option of Video Remote Interpreting (VRI), Access Interpreting’s staff and freelance interpreters are now able to service more clients across the United States, as VRI technology provides access to sign language interpreters when an in-person interpreter is not available.

The Access Interpreting VRI service is made possible with new webcam technology and high-speed internet. Using a webcam, the Deaf or hard of hearing customer and the hearing person they need to communicate with are connected to an interpreter from another location. As the hearing person listens to the interpreter speak through the speakers, the Deaf or hard of hearing customer is able to watch the interpreter on a television or computer screen.
Read Original Article . . .

 


 

 

New hearing aid pairs with Apple

March 21, 2014 in Technology

Original Article  Posted on: 5:00 pm, March 18, 2014, by updated on: 06:11pm, March 18, 2014

Fox 4 News - http://fox4kc.com/2014/03/18/new-hearing-aid-pairs-with-apple/

PRAIRIE VILLAGE, Kan. — No matter how you slice it, Apple technology is irresistible to many.  Now the hope is that Apple can even make getting a hearing aid more “app-pealing.”

Anita Willeke resisted getting hearing aids for years. “I think it was probably a little bit of vanity,” said Willeke.

But pair the hearing aid with Apple, and Willeke was ready.  Her iPhone is the remote control for her new hearing aids called LiNX.

Need more treble or bass on one side or both?  Adjust it on your phone.

“You can go in and make those fine-tuning adjustments and in the past, there’s been no ability for patients to do that on their own,” said Linda Erickson of Associated Audiologists in Prairie Village.

Erickson says the system saves settings for specific environments such as a favorite restaurant or, in Willeke’s case, the classroom where she teaches.

Willeke really likes the streaming of phone calls directly into the earpiece.

“And I’m able to hear what’s being said more clearly without the background noises that often bother me,” Willeke said.

She’s still getting the hang of it. “How far away can I get it when you still hear me,” she said as she spoke on the phone.

Erickson says you don’t have to hold the phone. “It could still be in your pocket and you could be having a conversation,” said the audiologist.

And what if you lose a hearing aid?  The iPhone will find it for you on GPS or, if you’re really close, just look at the bars on the screen.  Red means you’re getting warm.

As you might expect, the technology isn’t cheap.  Each hearing aid costs between $2,900 and $3,500.   Most people need two.

 


 

NPR receiver gets closed-captioned radio emergency alerts for the hearing impaired

January 6, 2014 in Community News, Technology

BY

I’ll be the first to admit that I had a little trouble wrapping my brain around this one, but I think I’ve got it now. Sure the appeal of closed-captioned radio for the hearing impaired is clear, but what wasn’t immediately apparent was why, precisely, one would want a standalone box for such information if you could potentially get it just as easily through, say, the station’s website. This first iteration (which is very much still in the proof-of-concept phase) is intended for emergency relief organizations like FEMA and NPR and its partners are currently testing it out in the Gulf states. The box uses a tablet as a display, getting emergency information through the radio spectrum, so you can use it when the power is out and your WiFi isn’t working — assuming you’ve still got juice in your tablet, which powers the box.

Read more . . . →

News on Made for iPhone Hearing Aids

November 26, 2013 in Hearing Loss & Deafness, Technology

Made For iPhone’ Hearing Aids Coming Early 2014

By Adnan Farooqu, ubergizmo.com (http://bit.ly/IgtmW3)11/25/2013aid_iphone

Most people might be unaware of the fact that Denmark supplies half of the world’s hearing aids. A lot of companies based in the country have consistently been working to leverage modern technology to help those who are hard of hearing or those who can’t hear at all. GN ReSound, a company based in Copenhagen, Denmark, has worked closely with Apple on its LiNX hearing aids which are the world’s first “Made for iPhone” hearing aids. The technology is actually quite impressive, these are the first hearing aids of any kind that can connect directly to a smartphone without needing a “streamer” that acts as a transmitter between a hearing aid and a Bluetooth equipped mobile phone.

LiNX hearing aids can be used to stream music and as a two-way headset for phone calls, its settings can be adjusted through a companion app for iOS. They communicate with the device through the 2.4 gigahertz band using Bluetooth 4.0 LE. LiNX is going to ship early next year, it will be priced a tad over $3,000 per hearing aid. Apple has also been working with other companies on similar products, William Demant in Denmark and Starkey Technologies in Minnesota have been working with Apple to create similar “Made for iPhone” products.


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. You do not need permission to share this information, but please be sure to credit NVRC.  This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

New FCC Rule on Accessible Navigation Devices

November 4, 2013 in Advocacy & Access, Technology

FCC Issues Video Programming Rule Requiring Navigation Devices be Accessible to Blind, Deaf

New rule covers devices used for over-the-top streaming to televisions, including game consoles and set-top boxes, as well as tablets and other mobile devices

By J.J. Smith, Streamingmedia.com 11/1/2013

The U.S. government has issued a rule requiring video equipment manufacturers—including the makers of devices used for streaming—and the producers of connected software ensure that the video-programming navigation devices in those products are “more easily” accessed by individuals who are blind or visually impaired, or who are deaf or hard of hearing.

On Oct. 31, the Federal Communications Commission issued a “report and order and further notice of proposed rulemaking” on “Accessibility of User Interfaces and Video Programming Guides and Menus” and “Access Emergency Information and Apparatus Requirements for Emergency Information and Video Description.”

The regulations listed in the document cover video “navigation devices” such as “converter boxes, interactive communications equipment, and other equipment used by consumers to access multi-channel video programming and other services offered over multi-channel video programming systems,” according to the document.

The FCC says such navigation devices includes devices that have a built-in capability to use a conditional access mechanism in order to access video programming and other services using a multi-channel video programming device (MVPD), the document says. Those devices include televisions, computers, and mobile devices such as tablets and smartphones that do not have pre-installed MVPD applications and that have removable media players.

Among those impacted by the regulation include the makers of video equipment containing navigation devices that are sold to the general public, and software manufacturers who produce programs that are installed into those navigation devices and that display on-screen text menus and guides, the document says.

The producers of those items have a three-year deadline to comply, but a specific deadline date is not included in the document. However, while the entities governed by the rule have three years to comply, they must also provide accessible navigation devices to requesting blind or visually impaired individuals “within a reasonable time,” the document says. The FCC defines a reasonable time as the period it takes such an entity to generally provide navigation devices to other consumers, according to the report and order.

For the rest of the story: http://bit.ly/HwKuXy

 


DIstributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. You do not need permission to share this information, but please be sure to credit NVRC.  This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

NEXTEP Kiosks Seek to Address Discrimination at the Drive Through

October 11, 2013 in Advocacy & Access, Community News, Technology

Ending Discrimination at the Drive Thru

From NEXTEP SYSTEMS

Read more and see captioned video: http://nextepsystems.com/ending-discrimination-at-the-drive-thru

Despite the American’s with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the ADA Amendments Act of 2008, people who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing continue to face the challenges posed by discrimination. As repeat defendants in the courtroom, Fast Casual and Quick Service restaurants have been making headlines for decades due to discrimination suits levied against them. McDonald’s, Burger King, Wendy’s, Steak’n Shake and even Starbucks have all had to defend themselves for failing to provide accommodations for individuals who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing, or because of the actions of their employees. Many times, this lack of accommodation, poor employee behavior, or both occurs at the drive thru.

Existing solutions don’t deliver consistent experiences for all

Attempts have been made to accommodate guests with hearing disabilities at the drive thru window by installing “call buttons.” The guest can press a button on the drive thru identifying their need for an alternative means to order and then pull forward to write their order on a simple paper menu. However, this still forces an interaction between the guest and potentially untrained or biased employees.

Whereas the responsibility for ADA compliant employee training falls squarely upon the employer, individual employee actions cannot be accounted for and the potential for discrimination remains, as observed in a recent lawsuit against Starbucks. Though Starbucks posthumously made the statement that the actions of the employees were not in accordance with their values of, “engaging the deaf community as partners and as customers,” the individual actions of their employees could not be contained.

Fortunately, there is a solution that addresses this problem

NEXTEP SYSTEMS developed the World’s Fastest Drive Thru® kiosk in 2006 to streamline the order process and drive revenue for quick service and fast casual restaurants. The touchscreen, all-weather device is the perfect solution to eliminate discrimination against people who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing.

Captioned Video Link


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. You do not need permission to share this information, but please be sure to credit NVRC.  This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

Researcher Developing System to Crowdsource Transcribing Speech

September 24, 2013 in Research, Technology

Making Computers Smarter, and Helping Deaf People Too

By Julie Rehmeyer, Scientific American 9/24/2013

A friend of mine is very hard of hearing — not quite deaf enough to fully belong to the deaf community, but sufficiently deaf that participating in a conversation is terribly hard work for her. She does her best to put together what she can hear with what she can lip read and what she can extrapolate, and then she asks her conversational partners to repeat themselves as often as she can bear. I was shocked to hear just how exhausting and isolating it is for her.

walter-dc-lg

Walter Laseck

One of the young researchers here is developing a solution that could make a big difference for people like her, as well as the fully deaf — and even for journalists. In particular, Walter Lasecki of the University of Rochester (together with his advisor Jeffrey Bigham) is creating a system to transcribe conversations in real time, with no advance planning, for a fraction of the cost of a skilled human transcriber.

Lasecki’s basic idea is to crowdsource the problem, using Amazon’s Mechanical Turk (or another service) to get six or seven people to simultaneously transcribe bits of the conversation. His software then stitches together the transcriptions using their overlaps to get a single coherent, accurate transcript. Ordinarily, transcription at real-time requires a highly skilled transcriber, who might charge $150 to $300 an hour; Lasecki’s system harnesses the ability of ordinary folks.

Lasecki pointed out that one of the big advantages of his system is that it eliminates scheduling hassles. Universities are required to provide “reasonable accommodation” for students with disabilities, which includes providing sign language interpreters. But usually, there are only a very few interpreters available, so if a student needs assistance at the last minute and hasn’t scheduled it at least 24 to 48 hours in advance, he may well be out of luck. But Lasecki’s system is always just a cell phone app away — and he aims for it cost no more than $50/hour.

Furthermore, for someone like my friend, who is hard of hearing but not quite deaf, sign language interpretation can be confusing and difficult. American sign language is truly a language, with its own syntax and grammar, not simply a transcription of English into motions. So catching some of the English and simultaneously watching the sign language interpretation requires a strange bifurcation of one’s mind.

That has also set a demanding task for Lasecki’s transcription system, because it requires that it work very, very quickly. If the system produces a transcription with a 15-second delay, a hard-of-hearing person who catches every other word can’t hold what they’ve heard in their minds and then use the transcription to fill it in, and so they’ll be forced to ignore what they hear entirely and rely fully on the transcription, and they then won’t be able to put together the words with the facial expressions and gestures. So he’s aimed to have his system produce a transcription within five seconds. He’s currently at just under four.

See the rest of the story at: http://tinyurl.com/k7d736x


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. You do not need permission to share this information, but please be sure to credit NVRC.  This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

Cochlear Implant Users – Earn $20 for 1-Hour Study at NVRC on August 21!

July 30, 2013 in Community News, Research, Technology

 

videoPhone$$$$$    Earn $20!!!    $$$$$

 

 

 

COCHLEAR IMPLANT USERS WANTED
FOR A ONE HOUR STUDY OF
VIDEO TELEPHONE SERVICES
FOR LIPREADING 

Wednesday, August 21, 2013,
from 10 am – 5 pm at NVRC

Interested?
Contact Paula Tucker for more information.
Email: paula.tucker@gallaudet.edu

 


Gallaudet University , Technology Access Program
This study has been approved by the
Gallaudet University Institutional Review Board

 

 

 


 

Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. You do not need permission to share this information, but please be sure to credit NVRC.  This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

FCC Public Notice – Volume Control on Wireline Phones

July 30, 2013 in Community News, Technology

FCC Issues Public Notice: Regarding Volume Control on Wireline Phones

On July 19, 2013, the FCC’s Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau released a Public Notice seeking comments on a petition for rulemaking filed by the Telecommunications Industry Association (TIA).  TIA requested the Commission to update its technical standard for volume control on wireline phones to allow people with hearing disabilities to achieve a more consistent experience when using amplification on these phones.
Comment Date:  August 19, 2013
Reply Comment Date:  September 19, 2013
Links to the Public Notice:
Word: http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DA-13-1601A1.doc
PDF:  http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DA-13-1601A1.pdf

For additional information, please contact Elaine Gardner, Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau, Disability Rights Office, (202) 418-0581, or email at Elaine.Gardner@fcc.gov.


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. You do not need permission to share this information, but please be sure to credit NVRC.  This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

Illinois is Newest State to Ban Button-Shaped Hearing Aid Batteries

July 9, 2013 in Community News, Technology

BELLEVILLE, Ill. (AP) — from SJ-R.COM
For more information: http://tinyurl.com/l3px4ut

The tiny button-shaped batteries that have been powering hearing aids since the late 1970s have long been known to be harmful to the environment because of their mercury content. Now, they’re illegal, as improving technology enables Illinois and several other states to ban them.

Mercury was removed from alkaline batteries in the mid-1990s, but the popular zinc-air button batteries in hearing aids were allowed to stay on the market because until recently manufacturers could not come up with a mercury-free alternative. An Illinois law signed a year ago took effect on Monday, and supporters say it could help reduce environmental contamination and the risk to public health from exposure to the toxin, which can cause organ damage.

“Mercury doesn’t break down,” explained Kevin Greene of the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency. “… If mercury gets into a water body, it can be converted into a more toxic form.”

Mercury that builds up in the body can damage the brain, kidney and central nervous system.


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. You do not need permission to share this information, but please be sure to credit NVRC.  This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

David Morrison on SmartTV Tech Advances for Deaf, Hard of Hearing

June 29, 2013 in Community News, Technology

Endless options for all disabilities:
SmartTV technology opens more communication lines for deaf, hard of hearing

From StarNews Online Wednesday, June 26, 2013 at 4:22 by David Morrison

With the increased use of telecommunications, it is important for individuals to have access to assistive technology. A recent article by the Associated Press demonstrates the positive impact these advances can have both in your home and in the workplace. High school football coach Kevin Bella utilizes a Video Relay Service to interact with his players via a live interpreter on his SmartTV.

“It’s a huge improvement over typing messages back and forth,” said Bella, a defensive coordinator at Mission San Jose High School in Fremont, Calif. “This allows me to work with hearing players, because there’s a lot in my language that has to do with expressions. The meaning is lost if sign language is reduced to written text.”

“Bella is among a rising number of disabled people who are increasingly able to find and keep jobs, as well as engage more broadly in their communities, because of new technologies specifically aimed at helping them better communicate or complete tasks.”

On a local level, the Wilmington Regional Center for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing offers a wide range of services. Specifically,

The communication process for individuals who are Deaf, Hard of Hearing, Deaf-Blind and Deaf with other disabilities may be aided by:

  • qualified sign language interpreters
  • tactile or up-close interpreters
  • assistive listening devices
  • real-time captioning
  • television captioning and decoders
  • computer assisted note-taking
  • oral interpretation
  • cued speech transliteration

If you are interested in learning more about these or other services provided by centers for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing in North Carolina, a full list of contacts by region can be found at http://www.ncdhhs.gov/dsdhh/where.htm Locally, you may contact the Wilmington Regional Center at 910-251-5702 (VOICE) 910-777-5770 (VIDEO) or 910-251-5767 (TTY)

As always, thanks for reading!

For more articles on disability related topics, see David’s blog at http://disabilities.blogs .starnewsonline.com  or become a fan on Facebook athttp://www.facebook.com/EndlessOptions . Have a question or comment? Reach David via email at david.morrison87@yahoo.com.  Want to provide public input or address disability concerns? Attend the Cape Fear Disability Commission (CFDC) The group meets the third Wednesday of the month at 10:30 a.m. at the NHC Government Center.

Next meeting: July 17, 2013


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. You do not need permission to share this information, but please be sure to credit NVRC.  This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

Legislators Discussing Tax to Aid Louisiana Deaf, Deaf-Blind Services

May 30, 2013 in Advocacy & Access, Community News, Technology

Gov. Jindal Won’t Hear of Tax to Aid Deaf Louisianans

By John Maginnis, Nola.com 5/28/2013

If you want to promise not to raise taxes, put it on your push cards and on your website, wear a sandwich board and shout it in the public square.”

Given the steep decrease in telephone land lines and the explosion in cell phones, the legislative bill to adjust the tax to pay for telecommunications services for the deaf seemed fair and reasonable. The bill before the House early in the session decreased the 5-cents-per-month tax on land lines to 2 cents and expanded it to cover wireless lines, which are currently untaxed. The penny ante tax swap would restore the Telecommunications for the Deaf Fund, which had fallen by half in recent years, to its 2005 level. But because fractions of cents can’t go on phone bills, the 2-cent levy would result in the deaf fund receiving about a half million dollars extra.

That overage, however, was a problem for the man in charge of tax policy in Louisiana. Grover Norquist would not hear of it. Norquist is the president of Americans for Tax Reform in Washington, D.C., and creator of the pledge signed by many American politicians to oppose all net tax increases. Certainly, he wasn’t following the debate at the time, but staff members for his ally, Gov. Bobby Jindal, sent word to legislators that a vote for House Bill 238 would be scored by ATR as a tax increase and, thus, a violation of the pledge.

The House passed the bill overwhelmingly anyway. Of the 16 representatives who have signed the pledge, six voted for the bill, five were against it and five were absent. (Curiously, four of the five absent voted on the previous bill, but, apparently, urgent business called them from the chamber before the vote on the phone tax. Score that as profiles in courage.)

The next week Jindal, who also has signed Norquist’s pledge, said he would veto the bill in its current form, but that it need not come to that. He offered to the author, Rep. Patrick Williams, D-Shreveport, to replace the money from the tax bill with another revenue source.

For the rest of the story: http://www.nola.com/opinions/index.ssf/2013/05/gov_jindal_wont_hear_of_tax_to.html


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. You do not need permission to share this information, but please be sure to credit NVRC.  This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.

Sen. Harkins Champions Captions, Video Description of Movies

May 28, 2013 in Captioning / Relay, Community News, Technology

ADA, Air Carriers Access Act Amendments Introduced by Senator Harkin;
Would Require Captions, Video Description in Movie Theaters, on Flights

Press release issued March 13, 2013

 Sen. Tom Harkin (D-IA), long-time champion of the rights of people with disabilities and author of the Americans with Disabilities Act, has introduced new amendments to the ADA and to the Air Carriers Access Act to expand access to media.

These new bills promise to fully include people with sensory disabilities in two key venues for entertainment and information: movie theaters and airlines. They require captions and video description in movie theaters as well as in-flight entertainment, and include provisions for making seat-back touch-screens accessible on airlines.

WGBH’s National Center for Accessible Media (NCAM: http://ncam.wgbh.org) successfully conducted research and development projects on each of these innovations, and brought captions and descriptions to movie theaters in the U.S. and Canada through its patented “MoPix” technology (www.mopix.org). NCAM also led the “Making In-flight Communication and Entertainment Accessible” project (http://ncam.wgbh.org/invent_build/movies/making-in-flight-communication) which prototyped captions, descriptions, and accessible displays for airline entertainment systems.

These innovative research projects were funded by the US Department of Education’s National Institute on Disability Research and Rehabilitation.

Press release from the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions (HELP):
http://www.help.senate.gov/newsroom/press/release/?id=347af2ed-b204-45a8-b565-0b8a218f5889&groups=Chair


Distributed 2013 by Northern Virginia Resource Center for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons (NVRC), 3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130, Fairfax, VA 22030; www.nvrc.org; 703-352-9055 V, 703-352-9056 TTY, 703-352-9058 Fax. Items in this newsletter are provided for information purposes only; NVRC does not endorse products or services. You do not need permission to share this information, but please be sure to credit NVRC.  This news service is free of charge, but donations are greatly appreciated.