Technology - Archive

How the Apple Watch is changing deafblind lives

July 15, 2016 in Technology

 

 

COMPUTERWORLD
APPLE HOLIC
By Jonny Evans
Jul 6, 2016

I’ve come across a compelling story that shows how Apple Watch can make a huge difference to enable deafblind people to live more independent lives.

It’s all available in this extensive post written by Usher Syndrome sufferer, Lady Usher. The author is London-based and gets around with the aid of a cane, a guide dog and an iPhone, but Apple Watch is transforming her life.

Empowerment

“My new Apple Watch has made things so much easier,” she writes. “I simply key in my route on my phone, pop it in my bag and the watch, hidden safely on my wrist, vibrates to tell me to go left and right using two different tactile pulses. Another signal lets me know when I have arrived at my destination. It is such a simple idea and so damn enabling.”

“Just three weeks after I got the watch, my guide dog and I entered a month-long team steps challenge at my work place. Together, we walked almost 200 miles through the busy streets of London, simply by following the vibrations of the AppleWatch and the simple on screen instructions. For the first time ever, it felt like we owned the streets. The whole of London has opened up to me for the first time since I lost my sight.”

READ more  . .  deafblind- Apple Watch

WELCOME to – Eric Raff New Deputy Director of the Virginia Department for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing

July 14, 2016 in Advocacy & Access, Technology

 

Please join us in welcoming Eric Raff as Deputy Director of the Virginia Department for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (VDDHH)! Eric joins us from Washington, where he was the director of the Washington State Office of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing for 12 years.

As Deputy Director, Eric helps oversee all VDDHH technology and outreach programs, including Virginia Relay and the Technology Assistance Program (TAP). Virginia Relay is a free public service that enables people in Virginia who are deaf, hard of hearing, DeafBlind or who have di culty speaking to communicate with standard telephone users. TAP provides no- cost telecommunication equipment to quali ed applicants who are unable to use a standard telephone.

See complete Announcement – DOWNLOAD Flyer

 

FCC Reinstates InnoCaption Conditional Certification for IP CTS

June 23, 2016 in Captioning / Relay, Community News, Technology

 

 

The Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau (CGB) of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) lifted the suspension of the conditional certification of InnoCaption to provide Internet Protocol Captioned Telephone Service (IP CTS).

In April of 2015, CGB suspended InnoCaption’s conditional certification to provide IP CTS because InnoCaption failed to provide 911 calling to emergency services as required by the FCC’s rules.  During the period of suspension, InnoCaption took steps to fix its service so it could handle 911 calls.  In the Order adopted today, CGB concludes that InnoCaption is now capable of handling 911 calls through its IP CTS service in compliance with the FCC’s rules.  As a result, InnoCaption is permitted to resume providing IP CTS.

The link(s) for the document are as follows:

https://apps.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DA-16-699A1.docx

https://apps.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DA-16-699A1.pdf

https://apps.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DA-16-699A1.txt

For further information contact Eliot Greenwald at eliot.greenwald@fcc.gov or 202-418-2235.

NEW Report Released: Hearing Health Care for Adults: Priorities for Improving Access and Affordability

June 2, 2016 in Community News, Hearing Aids, Hearing Loss & Deafness, Technology, Wearables

 

 

The National Academies Of Sciences, Engineering, & Medicine hearingHealth_cover

Date:  June 2, 2016

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Americans Need Easier Access, More Affordable Options for Hearing Health Care, Says New Report; FDA Should Remove Regulation for Medical Evaluation to Purchase Hearing Aids and Create New Category of Over-the-Counter Hearing Devices 

WASHINGTON – Hearing loss is a significant public health concern, and efforts should be made to provide adults with easier access to and more affordable options for hearing health care, especially for those in underserved and vulnerable populations, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.  The committee that carried out the study and wrote the report called for greater transparency and changes in the cost of hearing health care and expanded treatment options given the number of Americans who have hearing loss and the high cost of hearing health care.  It recommended that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration remove the regulation requiring adults to have a medical evaluation or sign an evaluation waiver to purchase a hearing aid, as well as establish a new category of over-the-counter, wearable hearing devices – separate from hearing aids – that could assist adults with mild to moderate hearing loss.  The report does not address surgical devices, such as cochlear implants, and related services.   Read more  . . . Press Release June 2 

Related Links to report:

The Language of Technology – a smartphone app called Five

May 27, 2016 in Technology

 

Can man change the world without knowing it? A high school student’s creation says yes, it can.

The Good Man Project
May 27, 2016

by Erin Kelly

“Mach is a fantastic example of what can happen when young people have access to technology, are able to develop their skills, and are free to create the things they wish to see in the world.”

These are the words of Upworthy.com contributor Melinda Clark, describing 17-year-old Mateusz Mach. At first glance, I, like many, thought he was your average high school student who likes to tinker with ideas. Ideas and passion are what drives mankind to move mountains after all, right?

That observation would be correct–but when Mach decided to put one of his “simple and fun” ideas into action, he coincidentally revolutionized  the way deaf people around the world communicate and interact with each other.

He created a smartphone app called Five, which allows deaf individuals to send and receive simple pictures of hand gestures–just as if they were using sign language in real time. He started receiving random text messages from members of the deaf community who used the app. They began thanking him for creating something that allowed them to communicate with one another freely, and in their own unique language. In May 2015, the app officially launched and has since been called “the world’s first messaging app for deaf people”–a title and accolade that Mach never saw coming.

Read more  . . See captioned Video . smartphone app called Five

Watch This Innovative ‘Sound Shirt’ Help Deaf People ‘Feel’ Music

May 20, 2016 in Hearing Loss & Deafness, Technology

 

 

Billboard
5/19/2016
by Chris Payne

Those with synesthesia claim to “see” sound as color. A tech-focused fashion house has developed a shirt that helps deaf people process music in another non-traditional method — by feeling it.

CuteCircuit created something called the Sound Shirt, which translates sound into sensations felt across the wearer’s body. Different notes create different feelings across corresponding areas of the garment; in theory, it could provide the deaf with a whole new way of internalizing something they cannot hear.

 

Read more  . . . See Captioned Video  . . . Sound Shirt

To sign or not to sign? That’s the question facing deaf children

May 20, 2016 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness, Technology

 

 

The invention of cochlear implants and other technologies have given many deaf and hard-of-hearing adults and children the option to hear. What, then, becomes of sign language?

When the world gets too loud—because of fireworks, or just to take a quiet break on the weekends—8-year-old Sophie knows what to do.

“When it’s really loud, I just take the magnet off,” she says.

She’s deaf and has had a cochlear implant that’s helped her hear since she was a year old. But she knows by moving that magnet she can stop the device from bringing her sound.

More than 1 in 500 children in the United States is born deaf or hard of hearing, making it the most common congenital sensory problem in the country. Technological advances, like Sophie’s cochlear implants, now give many children the ability to hear and communicate with spoken English from the time they are babies.

Sitting next to her on the couch in their living room, Sophie’s mom Samantha Zawislak says getting her daughter a cochlear implant, which requires surgery, was a difficult decision.

Read more  . . . . Sign?

Driving and Listening When You’re Hard of Hearing

May 1, 2016 in Hearing Loss & Deafness, Technology

 

 

Tips for the best ways to enjoy music and books in your car

The average American driver drives 13,746 miles a year, according to the Federal Highway Administration. What is the safest activity to fill those hours? Listening. Listening to recorded books, music, the radio – they all help while away the hours behind the wheel.

Unfortunately, for many people with hearing loss, that is not an easy accomplishment.

Prolong the Life of Your Hearing Aid Batteries – AARP

March 25, 2016 in Hearing Aids, Hearing Loss & Deafness, Technology

 

 

Some batteries may last two weeks, others just two or three days

How to keep your hearing aid batteries functional for longer. — Andras Csontos

There are few things more annoying than the unexpected beep in your ear that means your hearing aid battery is about to go dead. This is especially true if you don’t happen to have any spares.

Even in controlled studies, the life of a hearing aid battery has proven unpredictable. A 2013 report on wireless hearing aids in Audiology Online found that the real-life performance of most of the batteries tested deviated significantly from the standardized measurements reported by the manufacturers.

A battery for larger or non-wireless hearing aids may last two weeks, while another one for smaller or wireless hearing aids may last just two or three days. In some cases, the battery may be defective, but battery life also depends on the kind of hearing aid you have, how you use it, the kind of batteries you buy, and the assistive-listening devices you may use.

Read more . . .  Batteries

Other AARP Articles about Hearing Loss

We want to know your experience: Take the VRS Quality Survey!

March 22, 2016 in Community News, Technology

 

Mar 19, 2016

Gallaudet University Technology Access Program, National Association of the Deaf, and Telecommunications for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, Inc. are conducting a survey to learn about the experiences of people who are deaf and hard of hearing in their use of Video Relay Service (VRS). Our goal is to use the responses you provide to this survey to help inform the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) about the use of VRS among people who are deaf and hard of hearing.

https://tdiforaccess.org/2016/03/we-want-to-know-your-experience-take-the-vrs-quality-survey/

 

 

Hearing with Cochlear Implants

March 17, 2016 in Technology

 

“Children with cochlear implants are more likely to be educated orally and without access to sign language. Some deaf activists have labeled the widespread implantation of children, as cultural genocide.  Others call the criticism alarming and inaccurate.”

WTTV • CBS INDIANAPOLIS
BY DEBBY KNOX
MARCH 17, 2016

March 16, 2016)- Close to 325,000 people around the world have had cochlear implants surgically implanted.  In the US about 58,000 adults and 38,000 children have been recipients. In Indiana, cochlear implants have been available to profoundly deaf adults since the 1980’s

Cochlear implants are surgically implanted electronic devices which bypass the normal hearing process. A microphone is used and some electronics are placed outside the skin behind the ear.  Together the device transmits a signal to an array of electrodes in the cochlea, which stimulates the cochlear nerve.

Read more  . . . Cochlear Implants

Special backpacks help deaf students experience music

March 10, 2016 in Community News, Technology

 

 

How architecture changes for the deaf

March 3, 2016 in Community News, Technology

 

VOX
by Johnny Harris and Gina Barton
March 2, 2016

We live in a world made for people who hear. But what would our cities looks like if they were designed for the deaf? DeafSpace is an emerging approach to design and architecture that is informed by the unique sensory experience of those who don’t hear. In conjunction with Curbed’s feature on DeafSpace, we visited Gallaudet University to see what DeafSpace looks like in action.

Read more and watch captioned video

 

Access to hearing aids could help fight dementia, says doctor

February 25, 2016 in Hearing Aids, Hearing Loss & Deafness, Technology

 

Physician Frank Lin says treating hearing loss could help fight cognitive decline as he estimates 36% of dementia risk linked to hearing impairment

The Guardian News 
Sunday 14 February 2016

Hearing loss contributes to dementia and mental decline, according to new medical research by a doctor who plans to begin the first clinical trial to study whether hearing aids could prevent or mitigate brain decline.

On Sunday physician Frank Lin described his research at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in Washington DC.

“I’m asking how can our peripheral functions, namely hearing, affect our central functions – our brain,” he asked. “Unfortunately this question is completely unknown. This trial has never been done.”

Lin said the prevalence of hearing loss doubles for every decade of life, and that its high frequency has led physicians to dismiss it too often. “The vast majority of dementias in late life are multifactorial,” he said, “but the role of hearing loss has just not been studied.”

Read more  . . . dementia

These Headphones promise protection- noise-induced hearing loss

January 21, 2016 in Hearing Loss & Deafness, Technology

 

 

Puro Labs Bluetooth headphones review:
These cans promise protection from noise-induced hearing loss
TechHive
by Theo Nicolakis
Jan 21, 2016

Hearing is a precious gift. And while everyone’s hearing declines naturally with age, our lifestyle choices can be a key factor in noise-induced hearing loss. According to the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, as many as 16 percent of teens (children aged 12 to 19) have reported some hearing loss that could have been caused by loud noise—including listening to music while wearing headphones.

Prolonged exposure to loud noise—especially at higher volumes—can cause permanent hearing damage in a surprisingly short amount of time. Puro Sound Labs promises its Bluetooth headphones can reduce your risk of noise-induced hearing loss while listening to music. The company sent its model BT-2200 (for kids) and model BT-5200 (for adults) for this evaluation.

Read full  . . . . Review