Technology - Archive

Indiana helps lead way in implementation of 911 texting

February 24, 2015 in Emergency Preparedness, Technology

 

 

The Tribune
The Associated Press
February 22, 2015

 — All but four of Indiana’s 92 counties have signed on a system that allows phone users to send a text to 911 when they need emergency help, putting the state at the forefront of a technology that’s slowly making its way across the country.

Only Vermont and Maine have all counties accepting text messages to 911, the Palladium-Item reported (http://pinews.co/1vSsHlO ). Fifteen other states have a few counties each that participate in the “Text to 911″ system.

“It will eventually make it across the nation,” said Matthew Cain, deputy director of Wayne County Emergency Communications, which volunteered to be one of five pilot counties to explore the texting option. “It’s mainly geared toward the deaf community and the hard-of-hearing community, but it also benefits others when it’s unsafe to call.”

A federal order required all wireless carriers and text-messaging providers to allow users to send texts to local 911 dispatchers by the end of 2014.

In Indiana, only Lake, Jasper, Marion and Ripley counties have not accepted the system.

Cain said calling is still the best option for contacting 911 because communication is quicker between the dispatcher and the caller. But text messages are useful when a person has a hearing or speech impairment or when it’s unsafe for a person to speak, such as in cases of an abduction or domestic situation.

How Old Is Too Old for Cochlear Implant Reimplantation?

February 20, 2015 in Research, Technology

 

 

For people with severe to profound hearing loss, cochlear implants can restore hearing and improve quality of life. Initially FDA-approved in 1985, only individuals with bilateral profound sensorineural hearing loss with no open set speech recognition (in other words, some ability to understand speech without visual clues) were considered viable candidates for cochlear implants.  The criteria have become less rigid over time, and more people are eligible including those with more profound residual hearing and pre-implant speech recognition scores. Occasionally, devices fail or medical complications create a need for revision surgery and reimplantation. The incidence of revision surgery is low, but outcomes are variable.

Some studies have suggested that advanced age may be associated with poor post-revision outcomes. Investigators from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have completed a study that asks whether advanced age should be a contraindication for revision cochlear implantation.

Read More  . . . Reimplantation

Petition • Pay Innocaption for +100,000 minutes of captioned phone calls

February 20, 2015 in Community News, Technology

 

 

From Change.org

This petition will be delivered to: FCC

Pay Innocaption for +100,000 minutes of captioned phone calls for the deaf!

The FCC (Federal Communications Commission) is not paying Innocaption for the more than 100,000 minutes of services provided by them to support deaf and hard-of-hearing people to make and receive captioned telephone calls on cell phones.

Innocaption is a brand new company that has engineered new technologies to provide captioning to cell phones. The benefits of this technology has never before been experienced by hearing-impaired people: lightening fast captioning with almost no delay, mobile captioning on the go, captioned voice mail, and the abilty to both make and receive calls.

When this company started, FCC agreed to support them by paying for the minutes of captioning services. This way, deaf and HOH folk using the app don’t have to pay for anything more than what hearing people pay for to use cell phones.  

READ MORE  Sign this petition. . . Innocaption

 

What My Hearing Aid Taught Me About the Future of Wearables

February 5, 2015 in Technology

 

As human-enhancing technology becomes tinier and more advanced, the price of progress is complexity.

Prince Philip’s new mobile – with a ringtone as loud as a drill!

January 27, 2015 in Community News, Technology

 

 

  • Duke of Edinburgh starts using phone designed for hard of hearing
  • The amplicomms M8000 mobile is up to 80 times louder than normal 
  • The handset also features a larger keypad and an SOS emergency button
  • The company, Hearing Direct, received a thank-you call from the Palace 

THE DAILY MAIL , UK
By REBECCA ENGLISH FOR
January 16 2015 | UPDATED: January  19 2015

He only bedgrudgingly started to wear a hearing aid in public a few months ago.But Prince Philip is already making adjustments for it in other areas of his life.The 93-year-old royal has just started using a special mobile phone especially designed for people suffering from hearing loss, it can be revealed.

Most high street phones are not compatible for people wearing aids because of the levels of interfearence. And while Philip’s new amplicomms M8000 is short on smart phone-style gimmicks, it can be up to 80 times louder than regular mobiles.

It also has a powerful vibrating alert – and a ringtone that can sound as loud as a road drill.

Read more: 

 

Visual skills, technology key for ad agency’s hearing-impaired co-founder

January 23, 2015 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness, Research, Technology

 

 

Geoff Akins sees things others don’t.

The Newport Beach visual arts entrepreneur, who co-founded advertising agency AkinsParker 10 years ago, has been the creative force behind campaigns for brands like Toyota Racing Development, Tiger Woods Foundation and Lexus F-Sport.

Akins is profoundly deaf. But he says he can sense what clients and audiences are feeling and translate that into his work. He’s adept at picking up on a client’s actions in subtle visual traits.

“My hearing impairment makes me uniquely skilled at some things as well,” he said. “For example, I’m pretty in tune with body language and unspoken communication, especially interpersonal communication.”

According to research at UC Davis and UC Irvine, deaf people are quicker at recognizing and interpreting body language than those who can hear.

David Corina, professor in the UC Davis Department of Linguistics and Center for Mind and Brain and graduate student Michael Grosvald, now a post-doctoral scholar at UCI, measured the response times of deaf and hearing people to a series of video clips showing people making American Sign Language signs or “non language” gestures, such as stroking the chin.

“The real surprise was that deaf people were about 100 milliseconds faster at recognizing non-language gestures than were hearing people,” said Corina, whose work was published in the 2012 journal Cognition.

Read Entire Article

HLAA – WEBINAR: MFi (Made for iPhone) and Telecoil Technology-Wed Jan 21st

January 19, 2015 in Community Events, Technology

HLAA

 

 

 

 

 

photo of presenter
Guest Speaker: Juliëtte Sterkens, Au.D.
Date: Wednesday, January 21, 2015
Time: 8 p.m. – 9 p.m. Eastern Time

Join us this Wednesday for a free captioned webinar featuring Juliëtte Sterkens, Au.D., who will be presenting MFi (Made for iPhone) and Telecoil Technology: A Winning Team.

Juliëtte Sterkens, Au.D. took a leave from her audiology practice to take on the position of Hearing Loop Advocate for HLAA, traveling across the country to meet with HLAA Chapters and audiologists about the importance of telecoils and how to get a hearing loop project started in their community.

Summary
Please join HLAA Hearing Loop Advocate Juliëtte Sterkens, Au.D. for an informative session on Made For iPhone (MFi), Bluetooth and Telecoil Wireless Technology. Learn where and when each technology can help you hear with hearing devices you already own. Looking to replace your instruments in the near future? Attend this webinar to learn what questions to ask of your hearing provider regarding wireless technology.

How to Join the Webinar
Go to the Webinar Schedule page and click on the Join Webinar button.

Java is no longer a requirement to access our webinar platform, Blackboard Collaborate, but there is a series of steps required for first time attendees; we recommend spending a few minutes well in advance of the webinar making sure you are able to access Collaborate. Should you have any questions, please contact Nancy Macklin, HLAA Director of Events, at nmacklin@hearingloss.org or 301.657.2248 Ext. 106.

Hearing Loss Association of America 7910 Woodmont Ave, Suite 1200 Bethesda, MD 20814
Phone: 301-657-2248  |  Fax: 301-913-9413  |  Email: inquiry@hearingloss.org  |  Join HLAA

How Mobile Phone Compatible Hearing Aids Are Creating A New Market For ‘Hearables’

January 16, 2015 in Community News, Technology

 

 

Huff Post IMPACT
Laurel A. Christensen, Ph.D
Updated: 12/29/2014

Advances in healthcare have always gone hand-in-hand with the development of new, effective technologies. From the development and widespread use of the artificial pacemaker to advancements in joint replacement, technology helps people living with severe medical conditions live fuller, more active lives.

“Hearables” — the next “wearable” health trackers – are the next frontier in the convergence of healthcare and technology.

Why? Because it is time for an update to digital hearing aid technology.

Since the introduction of digital hearing aids in the 1980s, technology has enabled us to make great strides in the industry. First, hearing aids have been miniaturized by smaller platforms and in turn these powerful platforms have enabled sophisticated sound processing algorithms that give the user a more natural listening experience. Further, we have expanded the hearing aid to a complete hearing system that connects wirelessly to accessories that allows improved hearing even in noisy environments and with the TV and telephone.

To go from hearing aid to hearables we now directly connect hearing aids with iOS devices.

Read More  . . .

 

Portland Captioning Proposal Receives Enthusiastic PCOD Support

December 17, 2014 in Captioning / Relay, Technology

 

 

PORTLAND, OR December 16, 2014, Spokespersons for Portland: Turn on the Captions Now! (PTCN) David Viers and Jim House co-presented about PTCN’s efforts to require all television sets in public places within the city to the Portland Commission on Disability (PCOD) at its regular meeting on Friday, December 12, 2014. The presentation was followed by a few questions, and concluded with a resounding vote of support by the Commission.

In the presentation, David and Jim reviewed the advantages of captioning, and the lack thereof on many television sets in public places like restaurants, bars, gyms, waiting rooms, libraries and other places where people watch television outside the homes. However, many public places have become proactive in turning on the captions, simply because of the noisy environment and the fact that customers need a way to know what is being said during newscasts, sports games, and emergency announcements.

There are similar laws in San Francisco and the State of Maryland. Portland has the opportunity to take the lead and become a Model City for Individuals with Disabilities according to Portland City Council member Amanda Fritz, who is introducing the ordinance for consideration by the Portland City Council. The San Francisco ordinance required captioning at all times, but limited the scope of coverage to government facilities and sponsored events such as outdoor movies in a park. The Maryland law expanded the scope of coverage to include private businesses, but the requirement is effective only when a customer or patron makes a request, which is often unfruitful because of so-called technical difficulties or staff inexperience. The City of Portland can expand on the merits of both prior legislations while crafting its ordinance. The primary goal of enforcement would be to educate businesses of their obligations and to empower consumers by making them aware of their rights to access information on television.

After the presentation, there were some questions regarding Spanish captioning and theatrical movie captioning. At the end, the PCOD voted unanimously to support the concepts and looks forward to helping PCTN move the captioning proposal forward.

 

“With the passage of this ordinance, Portland will show everyone – both citizens and visitors — that this is a city that is welcoming to everyone, regardless of abilities or disabilities,” exclaimed Carol Studemund, who helped initiate this grassroot effort.  Carol is the founder and president of LNS Captioning, serves on the captioning committee of National Court Reporters Association, is chair of the Mt. Hood Cable Regulatory Commission, and also with Portland Community Media.

 

“With the help of PCTN, Portland has this opportunity to take the lead and blaze new trails in accessibility where everyone has full and equal access to vital information on televisions anywhere and everywhere,” proclaimed Jim House, a technology accessibility specialist who spearheaded this effort with Ms. Studenmund.  A native of Portland, Jim also serves on the accessibility committee of National Emergency Numbering Association and recently relocated here after spending more than 15 years with Telecommunications for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, Inc. in Washington, D.C. promoting accessible technologies for people with hearing disabilities at the Federal Communications Commission and other consumer, government, and industry forums.

 

“This proposed ordinance to turn on the captions on televisions in every public place will enhance the quality of life for both non-hearing and hearing people in the City of Roses,” said David Viers, an advocate for people who are hard of hearing who lends a hand promoting this effort .  Viers is a semi-retired nonprofit administrator with experience in two centers for people who are deaf and hard of hearing.

 

Grateful appreciation is due to the following consumer organizations for their support:

  • Oregon Association of the Deaf
  • Hearing Loss Association of America – Oregon State Association (HLAA-OR)
  • Oregon Communications Access Project (OR-CAP), a local grassroot advocacy group that is credited with implementing captioning at the Oregon Shakespearean Festival, University of Oregon, Oregon State University, Portland Trail Blazers, and other venues.

 

To support our efforts and be informed with updates of future developments, go to:

 

Jim House

 

Nanoplug invisible hearing aid looks like an eraser

December 16, 2014 in Community News, Technology

 

 

Slash Gear
Dec 12, 2014

If you have ever known anyone that had to wear a hearing aid, you probably remember them as bulky beige devicesthat protrude obviously from the ear. A new hearing aid has been unveiled that claims to be the world’s smallest. In fact the Nanoplug is so small its makers claim that it is invisible once inside the ear.

Nanoplug is an instant fit hearing aid that works for people with mild to moderate hearing loss. It measures in at 7.1mm x 5.7mm x 4.17mm making it smaller than a typical coffee bean or peanut. In addition to helping people hear conversations, the Nanoplug is also suitable for use with mobile phones.

Read More  . . .

AZ State Journalism Student Launches Ground-breaking Deaf & Hearing Network

December 12, 2014 in Advocacy & Access, Community News, Technology

 

 

collegemediamatters.com
Posted by 
Friday, December 12, 2014

Inspiration alert: A journalism student at Arizona State University launched and maintains a trailblazing news operation known as the Deaf and Hearing Network.


According to a Downtown Devil report
, DHN is “the first news broadcast to combine speaking, signing and captions.” As the network’s About page confirms, “We will give millions of deaf and hard of hearing people — as well as hearing, American Sign Language students, interpreters and generally curious people — a way to get news in the language they prefer.”

 

ASU junior Peyton Gallovich started DHN in January. Over the past 11 months, the DHN team has amassed more than 1,500 subscribers, 4,000 Facebook page likes, 140 videos and 150,000 total viewers.

For Gallovich, the professional metrics are built atop a personal passion for ASL and combining the deaf and hearing worlds. As she tells the Devil, “DHN is a great resource for becoming aware of deaf issues. We often take deaf issues and give them a hearing perspective and vice versa. … TV news or written news can be hard for [deaf] students to understand because they are still learning English as a second language. By giving them news in ASL they can be aware of their world in their language.”

Watch video learn more  . . .

FDA Approves WaterWear for MED-EL’s RONDO

December 11, 2014 in Technology

 

 

Completely submergible cover allows full moisture protection with the freedom of an all-in-one cochlear implant audio processor

Herald Online
December 11, 2014

 — MED-EL USA announced today the FDA approval of the WaterWear fully waterproof cover for the all-in-one RONDO Audio Processor. The remarkably thin WaterWear will not compromise microphone performance, so RONDO recipients can be in and around water while enjoying excellent hearing performance. The sleek, skin-tight cover is engineered for optimal comfort. WaterWear will be available in early 2015. The announcement was made at the 14thSymposium on Cochlear Implants in Children in Nashville, Tenn.

WaterWear packs include three covers, each of which can be used up to three times. The covers can be worn for up to  . . .

Cochlear implantation in patients with Meniere’s disease study results

December 11, 2014 in Hearing Loss & Deafness, Research, Technology

 

Maney Online
Maney Publishing’s Online Platform

Few studies have addressed the benefits of cochlear implantation for the small group of patients with bilateral, end-stage Meniere’s disease, or unilateral disease with contralateral hearing loss from another cause. Our retrospective study evaluates the effectiveness and post-operative performance in these Meniere’s disease patients and discusses these findings relative to other post-lingually deafened adults.

Read Method, Results, & Conclusion of Study

Revolutionary earphones aim to help prevent hearing loss in teenagers, musicians

December 11, 2014 in Hearing Loss & Deafness, Technology

 

 

Malay Mail Online
December 9, 2014

NEW YORK, Dec 9 — In response to increasing reports of hearing loss in teenagers and risk of hearing loss for musicians, audio engineer to the stars Stephen D. Ambrose has revolutionised earphones with his RealLoud technology, which eliminates harmful pressures.

Earphones and in-ear monitors are known to be harmful, although they offer advantages for musicians and audio engineers, such as providing a mix of audio sources to the performer.

Because they seal the ear canal, the acoustic pressure of the sound turns to pneumatic pressure, which causes tiny muscles in the ear to contract in attempts to dull the sound, making the user need an even higher volume.

The secret is a secondary eardrum in the device that absorbs pneumatic pressure that builds up as a result of sound in the ear canal that’s sealed by an ear-bud.

Ambrose has added this second drum into all his ADEL earphones and 1964ADEL in-ear monitors, which were his groundbreaking innovations of the 1960s.

– Read more at:
http://www.themalaymailonline.com/features/article/revolutionary-earphones-aim-to-help-prevent-hearing-loss-in-teenagers-music#sthash.eWXG3o0M.dpuf

 

Nanoplug Surpasses Their $80K Indiegogo Funding Goal

December 9, 2014 in Hearing Loss & Deafness, Technology

 

Tech Cocktail
 –  for the Munich Edition

When they started their Indiegogo campaign back in November, Nanoplug reached over $25,000 of their $80,000 goal before the first week was even over. Today, with 21 days left on the campaign clock, Nanoplug officially announced that they have surpassed their funding goal on Indiegogo.

“We have spent thousands of hours developing Nanoplug for those millions around the world with hearing impairments,” says Nevena Zivic, founder of Nanoplug. “We have hit our funding goal of $80,000 with over 300 backers who are suffering from hearing loss.”

The attraction to fund the Nanoplug is due to the fact that it’s a new age hearing aid that offers all the benefits for a hearing-impaired individual but with none of the social stigma attached. That is, it’s nearly invisible in the ear, user programmable, and offers new age sound quality without the outdated look of our grandparents’ hearing aids.

“I envisioned a world where hearing aids didn’t have to be medical devices but instead could be a lifestyle product or accessory, where people with hearing issues didn’t stick out,” says Zivic. “Social stigma still hinders people from taking advantage of ordinary hearing aids, but with the Nanoplug, we could say goodbye to them.”Article link

 Original Article