The Language of Technology – a smartphone app called Five

May 27, 2016 in Technology

 

Can man change the world without knowing it? A high school student’s creation says yes, it can.

The Good Man Project
May 27, 2016

by Erin Kelly

“Mach is a fantastic example of what can happen when young people have access to technology, are able to develop their skills, and are free to create the things they wish to see in the world.”

These are the words of Upworthy.com contributor Melinda Clark, describing 17-year-old Mateusz Mach. At first glance, I, like many, thought he was your average high school student who likes to tinker with ideas. Ideas and passion are what drives mankind to move mountains after all, right?

That observation would be correct–but when Mach decided to put one of his “simple and fun” ideas into action, he coincidentally revolutionized  the way deaf people around the world communicate and interact with each other.

He created a smartphone app called Five, which allows deaf individuals to send and receive simple pictures of hand gestures–just as if they were using sign language in real time. He started receiving random text messages from members of the deaf community who used the app. They began thanking him for creating something that allowed them to communicate with one another freely, and in their own unique language. In May 2015, the app officially launched and has since been called “the world’s first messaging app for deaf people”–a title and accolade that Mach never saw coming.

Read more  . . See captioned Video . smartphone app called Five

Outreach Services, VSDB presents a family event – Where the Wild Things Are!

May 27, 2016 in Community Events, Education & Outreach, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

Outreach Services, VSDB presents a family event – Where the Wild Things Are!
June 18, 2016, 9:30 – 1:00

with collaboration with VA Department of the Blind and Vision Impaired, VA Association of Parents of Children with Visual Impairments, and VA Project for Children and Young Adults with Deaf-Blindness

Join us as the Wildlife Center of Virginia showcases some of their rescued animals, while teaching us about mammals, birds, and reptiles that roam at night! Related fun, educational activities will precede the show, and lunch for all will follow. This activity is open to students ages 4 through 18 who are deaf, hard of hearing, blind or visually impaired and their immediate family members.

Please compete the registration form (linked) and submit it to register your child and family for “Where the Wild Things Are”, June 18, 2016. All attendees must register in advance.

To REGISTER, go to:
http://goo.gl/forms/UzONiKH0fXc7wxfi1

This event will be held in Staunton, VA, and limited to the first 25 students and their families who register. Emails will be sent to let those who register know if they have been confirmed for the event, or if they will be on a waiting list. Questions should be sent to Dr. Debbie Pfeiffer at Debbie.pfeiffer@vsdb.k12.va.us The deadline for receiving registrations is Friday, June 10, 2016.

Questions should be sent to Dr. Debbie Pfeiffer, Director of Outreach Services at debbie.pfeiffer@vsdb.k12.va.us or call 540-414-5249. Thanks! We hope to see you there!

Debbie

DOWNLOAD – Agenda_for_Saturday_June_18

DOWNLOAD – Paper_Registration_Form_&_Agenda

NVAD General Meeting & Strawberry Festival – June 11

May 26, 2016 in Community Events

 

Northern Virginia Association of the Deaf

Saturday, June 11, 2016
9:30AM to 12:00PM – NVAD General Meeting
12:00PM to 2:00PM – Strawberry Festival

Location:
Northern Virginia Resource Center

3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130
Fairfax, VA 22030

~ The Strawberry Sensations ~ Strawberry Shortcake with ice cream topped with whipped cream Banana Split with ice cream, strawberries topped with whipped cream Strawberry Smoothie topped with whipped cream Strawberries over ice cream ~

~ ~ ~ No Restrictions ~ ~ ~ ~

For more information, contact
NVAD President Donna Graff-Viall
missgraffie@gmail.com (email) or 571-766-0671 (VP)

There will be no NVAD general meeting in July and August 2016. See you in September 2016. Have a great summer!

DOWNLOAD – NVAD_General_Meeting&Strawberry_Festival_Flyer

Parents of Deaf Children, Stuck in the Middle of an Argument

May 26, 2016 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

The New York Times
By TINA DONVITO

A long-simmering controversy erupted this spring over how deaf children should communicate.

It started when The Washington Post ran a story on Nyle DiMarco, the deaf “Dancing With the Stars contestant who is also an advocate for American Sign Language (ASL). When Meredith Sugar, president of the Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, retorted that ASL was becoming obsolete in light of better hearing aid and cochlear implant technology, the arguing went public. But that debate was really just the latest manifestation of a longstanding conflict among deaf people and parents of deaf children: Should children be fitted for hearing aids and taught to speak, or should they use sign language? Or a combination of both?

As the parent of a 2-year-old whose hearing loss was recently diagnosed, the arguments only heightened my anxiety about how to address my son Sam’s needs.

Read more  . . . Parents of Deaf Children

Born without hearing, an 11-year-old takes on the National Spelling Bee

May 26, 2016 in Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

Washington Post
By Joe Heim
May 24, 2016

As he walked out of his elementary school last week, fifth-grader Neil Maes heard the clapping from his fellow students lining both sides of the hallways. He heard them cheer and yell his name, and he heard them wish him luck as he headed off to compete in the Scripps National Spelling Bee, which starts Wednesday morning at the Gaylord National Resort and Convention Center in National Harbor, Md.

That the shy 11-year-old from Belton, S.C., can hear anything at all is a testament to technology, to a never-quit attitude and to faith, say his parents, Christy, a preschool teacher, and Peter, an aircraft mechanic.

The Maeses, who found out their son was severely hearing-impaired just days after he was born, have been working nonstop since then to help him have hearing that’s as close to normal as possible.

When the couple learned that their son couldn’t hear, they were in shock.

Read more  . . . Spelling Bee

How Nyle DiMarco Changed The World Through Dance

May 26, 2016 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

Can this dance help settle the controversial debate on how to raise Deaf Children?

Buzz Feed
posted on May 25, 2016,
Anthony Mowl – COMMUNITY USER

A Symbol Of Progress

When Dancing With the Stars awarded Nyle the Mirror Ball on the 22nd Dancing With the Stars Finale, it felt like the right end to an inspirational season for millions of viewers. There’s no doubt that the victory- and the wildly popular Nyle DiMarco – gave the Deaf Community a watershed moment. A symbol of progress, but perhaps not the kind you might think.

If comedian Chris Rock were bold enough to make a Deaf joke, he might say something similar to what he said when Barack Obama was first elected president in 2008, disagreeing with people who said it was a sign of “black progress”.

“That’s not black progress. That’s white progress. There’s been black people qualified to be president for hundreds of years.”

Nyle made the DWTS finals because he took the kind of risks that many of the other celebrity amateur dancers would never take week in and week out. He danced without music one week, blindfolded the next, and with a male (a DWTS first) in a different week.

Read More  . . . Deaf Children

Cisplatin may cause more permanent hearing loss in people with Cockayne syndrome

May 24, 2016 in Community News, Research

 

 

Science Daily
May 19, 2016

Chemotherapy drug cisplatin is used to treat breast, prostate, neuroblastoma, melanoma and many other cancers

Date:
May 18, 2016
Source:
University of Southern California
Summary:
The chemotherapy drug cisplatin can kill cancer, but it can also cause permanent hearing loss. The drug can kill the sensory cells of the inner ear, a phenomenon that is likely more severe in individuals with Cockayne syndrome, a rare form of dwarfism. The disorder results from mutations in one of two genes involved in repairing DNA damage. Cells can sustain DNA damage from environmental stresses ranging from the sun’s ultraviolet radiation to toxic chemicals such as chemotherapy drugs.
Read full Article . . . cisplatin 
Other Source: Key mutations may worsen hearing loss from the chemotherapy drug cisplatin

Disturbed Give Blessing For Deaf ‘Dancing With the Stars’ Contestant to Use ‘The Sound of Silence’

May 24, 2016 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

Loudwire
By Graham Hartmann
May 24, 2016 

Disturbed’s cover of Simon & Garfunkel’s “The Sound of Silence” has been one of the most well-received re-imaginings in modern music. Last night (May 23), two of the finalists on Dancing With the Stars based one of their numbers on “The Sound of Silence,” with the most adamant of enthusiasm coming from Disturbed.

Dancing With the Stars is down to three pairs of finalists. Male model / actor Nyle DiMarco and dance partner Peta Murgatroyd are close in their journey to capture the championship on Dancing With the Stars’ 22nd season. This is even more impressive considering DiMarco is deaf. Thus, he wanted to use “The Sound of Silence” to bring awareness to the deaf community’s history.

DiMarco sent the following message to Disturbed in hope of getting the band’s blessing to use “The Sound of Silence”:

Read More: Disturbed Give Music to Deaf Dancing With the Stars Finalist

Four Things Parents of Deaf Children Need to Know

May 24, 2016 in Community News, Education & Outreach, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

HuffPost – Accessibility
The Blog
by Mark Drolsbaugh
Author, public speaker, and Deaf advocate

05/24/2016

“Yep,” the audiologist confirmed. “Your son does indeed have a hearing loss.”

“That makes sense,” I said. “I’m Deaf, Melanie’s Deaf. I guess our kid’s not going to skip the family curse.”

Melanie and I smiled. After a brief pause, so did the audiologist. For a moment I wondered if she thought there was something wrong with us. It must have been odd for her to witness a nonchalant response along the lines of “How about that? Another Deaf Drolsbaugh.”

 

The audiology exam was the easy part. The hard part was the first IEP meeting the following school year. Melanie and I walked into that with no idea what to expect.

We got ambushed.

School staff, administrators, and representatives from the school district took turns telling us what to do with our Deaf child.

 

Read more . . . Parents of Deaf Children

Watch This Innovative ‘Sound Shirt’ Help Deaf People ‘Feel’ Music

May 20, 2016 in Hearing Loss & Deafness, Technology

 

 

Billboard
5/19/2016
by Chris Payne

Those with synesthesia claim to “see” sound as color. A tech-focused fashion house has developed a shirt that helps deaf people process music in another non-traditional method — by feeling it.

CuteCircuit created something called the Sound Shirt, which translates sound into sensations felt across the wearer’s body. Different notes create different feelings across corresponding areas of the garment; in theory, it could provide the deaf with a whole new way of internalizing something they cannot hear.

 

Read more  . . . See Captioned Video  . . . Sound Shirt

To sign or not to sign? That’s the question facing deaf children

May 20, 2016 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness, Technology

 

 

The invention of cochlear implants and other technologies have given many deaf and hard-of-hearing adults and children the option to hear. What, then, becomes of sign language?

When the world gets too loud—because of fireworks, or just to take a quiet break on the weekends—8-year-old Sophie knows what to do.

“When it’s really loud, I just take the magnet off,” she says.

She’s deaf and has had a cochlear implant that’s helped her hear since she was a year old. But she knows by moving that magnet she can stop the device from bringing her sound.

More than 1 in 500 children in the United States is born deaf or hard of hearing, making it the most common congenital sensory problem in the country. Technological advances, like Sophie’s cochlear implants, now give many children the ability to hear and communicate with spoken English from the time they are babies.

Sitting next to her on the couch in their living room, Sophie’s mom Samantha Zawislak says getting her daughter a cochlear implant, which requires surgery, was a difficult decision.

Read more  . . . . Sign?

Art Signs:  Gallery talks in ASL at Smithsonian American Art Museum

May 20, 2016 in Advocacy & Access, Community Events

 

 

Join us this Sunday afternoon at 1 p.m. for Art Signs gallery talks in ASL at the Smithsonian American Art Museum

Art Signs guides Elizabeth Henry and Emily Blachly will lead discussion on artworks from our collection.   Among the sculpture discussed will be Monekana by Deborah Butterfield and Its Another Spring by Man Ray. Enjoy conversation and learn something new!

Sunday, May 22 at 1 p.m.
Meet at the F Street Information Desk

Smithsonian American Art Museum
8th & F Street, NW
Washington, DC

Metro:  Gallery Place

Upcoming Art Signs dates:
Sunday, June 26, 1 p.m.
Thursday, June 16, 5:30 p.m.
Thursday, July 14, 5:30 p.m.
Thursday, August 18, 5:30 p.m.

TDI seeks Product Manager for a Speech-to-Text Captioning/Caption Correction Project

May 19, 2016 in Captioning / Relay, Employment

 

 

TDI is seeking a talented and versatile Product Manager to lead the development of a Speech-to-Text Captioning/Caption Correction product.  The ideal candidate will have a strong, clear commitment to meeting the purpose, goals, and timelines.  The product seeks to create scalable access to low-cost, accurate captions for live events by combining speech-to-text technology with real-time caption corrections made by designated peers.  These services will allow event participants (who have permission), to make corrections to captions in real-time during events.  Everyone viewing the captions, will see the corrected captions instantly.  This technology enables the provision of highly accurate, low-cost, captioning services wherever the use of professional captioning services are not logistically, technically, or financially feasible.  TDI has a subcontract with IDEAL Group, Inc. to develop, implement, and maintain the captioning service.  The web-based service will be accessible using Internet-connected devices running a variety of operating systems.

Announcement on TDI website:  https://tdiforaccess.org/job/product-manager/

DOWNLOAD – TDI position announcement, Product Manager, TDI’s Speech-to-Text Captioning Project, May 1, 2016

The Art of Nonverbal Communication in Practice

May 17, 2016 in Community News

 

 

Hearing Journal:
doi: 10.1097/01.HJ.0000483270.59643.cc
Nonverbal Communication
Author – Dr. Hull is professor of communication sciences and disorders, in audiology/neuroscience, at Wichita State University in Wichita, KS.

Nonverbal communication can be more powerful—and even more influential—than what we say with words, and can have a tremendous impact on our success as hearing health care professionals.

Experts in interpersonal communication have estimated that nonverbal communication constitutes approximately 70 percent of what is involved in communication. In other words, only about 30 percent of communication involves the actual words that we use. Placing the impact of nonverbal communication at 93 percent has been deemed a little high, however, so a safer level is thought to be around 80 percent—which is still quite an impressive figure. This means that only 20 percent of the impact of our communication is from the words that we use.

Read more  . . . Nonverbal Communication

Caption Studies 2016 Conference – Aug 1st-2nd, 2016 (Online!)

May 17, 2016 in Captioning / Relay, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

The online conference is planned for days in August 2016: Monday, August 1st, and Tuesday, August 2nd. A face-to-face conference for two days in late July, 2017, at Western Oregon University. For more information, follow this link.

The online conference will take place from noon through 5 pm PST on both days. Registration (free) will be required in order to participate. This will help us better organize and respond in the future as well as give us a sense of the community participation.

Conference’s Purpose

Having spoken with many people as the conference organization has gone forward, it’s clear that the captioning community is positive, engaged, and constructive. Rather than lament the flood of bad captions or the dearth of quality captions, we want to promote what is health, interesting, strong, and engaging in the captioning community. This means having time to share and connect with people from different parts of the captioning community.

Read more  . . . http://captionstudies.wou.edu