ASL Instructor needed, Lord Fairfax Community College, Warrenton, VA

July 22, 2014 in Community News

 

ASL Instructor to teach class for Career Studies Certificate in American Sign Language. Part time, ongoing position, two classes each semester. Minimum qualifications are a master’s degree and ASL certification.

Contact:
Edith M. Kennedy, D. A.
Associate Dean of Instruction-Fauquier

Lord Fairfax Community College
6480 College Street
Warrenton, VA 20187-8820
(540) 351-1516

Job Opening Captioned Telephone Outreach Coordinator – VA

July 22, 2014 in Captioning / Relay, Community News

 

Staffed in Richmond, VA

Hamilton Relay Services Division in Virginia currently has a full time position open for “Virginia Captioned Telephone Services Outreach Coordinator”.

We are an equal opportunity employer. We do not discriminate on the basis of race, religion, color, sex, age, national origin or disability. 

Position summary:  This full-time position is responsible for coordinating and implementing outreach activities designed to promote Captioned Telephone Service (CapTel®) for Virginia Captioned Telephone Service (VACTS).

Education, Experience and Skills:

  • Bachelor’s degree and two or more years of experience in the design and implementation of public outreach, public relations or related marketing experience are required.
  • Experience in the telecommunication field, Traditional Relay Service or Captioned Telephone Service is a strong plus.
  • Excellent presentation skills
  • Ability to develop effective outreach and educational campaigns
  • Ability to confidently communicate (oral & written) with a wide variety of audiences
  • Ability to plan, schedule and execute multiple projects
  • Ability to understand and follow directions
  • Capacity to develop and maintain effective working relationships with Relay Administrator, organizations within the public, private and non-profit sectors
  • Knowledge of and ability to understand various communication modes used by current and potential relay users
  • Familiarity with the user communities that could benefit from relay services:
    o   Senior Community
    o   Hard of Hearing Community
  • Able to travel alone
  • Captioned Telephone users are encouraged to apply

For the full job description and application visit www.workforhamilton.com by August 4, 2014.

Hamilton Relay, Inc. is a division of Hamilton Telecommunications based in Aurora, NE. Hamilton offers a competitive wage and company paid benefits.  For questions in regards to this position please contact our corporate HR Dept. at: 800.821.1831 

Download PDF document of posting

 

Silent take on ‘Old Man and the Sea’ at Capital Fringe festival

July 21, 2014 in Community News

 

 

 July 11
Article Source

The 2014 Capital Fringe festival launched in earnest Thursday night with roughly 30 shows, one of them a wordless adaptation of “The Old

Hector J. Reynoso wrote, directs and stars in Capital Fringe festival's “The Old Man Never Let It Go.” (Johnny Shryock)

Hector J. Reynoso wrote, directs and stars in Capital Fringe festival’s “The Old Man Never Let It Go.” (Johnny Shryock)

Man and the Sea” directed and performed by deaf actor Hector J. Reynoso.

Hemingway without the language? In “The Old Man Never Let It Go,” Reynoso proves that it’s do-able, in the same way that D.C.’s acclaimed Synetic Theatre has franchised Shakespeare without the dialogue and speeches. (Reynoso has performed with Synetic a number of times.) You mine the story for action and keep the stage buzzing with vivid imagery and deeply moody music.

In the small Lab II theater of the Atlas Performing Arts Center, Reynoso plays the aged fisherman against a terrific video backdrop by projection designer Igor Dmitry. Vistas include sparkly beaches and scorching sun, but there is a lyrical, dreamy quality, too — although as Reynoso rows around the stage in a little boat against a glistening ocean to a lightly jazzy Spanish guitar tune, the performance drifts uncomfortably toward bland music video doldrums.

The constant musical underscoring and sound design is by Synetic’s Konstantine Lortkipanidze, and at its best it drives distinct, shifting rhythms in the saga of the fisherman’s battle with a marlin.

The book resists the stage a little, but then Reynoso’s 30-minute take is more a poetic distillation than a full-bodied adaptation. The bearded, bushy haired Reynoso himself is charismatic as the old man, padding about in baggy trousers and a rumpled hat. Comfortably enveloped by the compelling technical design, the actor pantomimes a simple life and then the epic, solitary struggle at sea. The brief show winds up as a limited but likable portrait of deep pride and passion.

“The Old Man Never Let It Go” will be performed four more times through July 26 in Lab II of the Atlas Performing Arts Center, 1333 H St. NE. Visitcapitalfringe.org.

Article Source

Untreated Hearing Loss Linked to Depression, Social Isolation in Seniors

July 17, 2014 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

American Academy of Audiology
Originally published in Audiology Today, Vol. 11:4, 1999.
Article Source

Untreated hearing loss has serious emotional and social consequences for older persons, according to a major new study by The National Council on the Aging (NCOA). The study was conducted by the Seniors Research Group, an alliance between NCOA and Market Strategies, Inc. 

“This study debunks the myth that untreated hearing loss in older persons is a harmless condition,” said James Firman, EdD, president and CEO of The National Council on the Aging. The survey of 2,300 hearing impaired adults age 50 and older found that those with untreated hearing loss were more likely to report depression, anxiety, and paranoia and were less likely to participate in organized social activities, compared to those who wear hearing aids. 

Hearing loss is one of the most prevalent chronic conditions in the United States, affecting more than nine million Americans over the age of 65 and 10 million Americans age 45 to 64. But about three out of five older Americans with hearing loss and six out of seven middle-aged Americans with hearing loss do not use hearing aids.

Consequences of Untreated Hearing Loss

The survey found that significantly more of the seniors with untreated hearing loss (those who do not wear hearing aids) reported feelings of sadness or depression that lasted two or more weeks during the previous years. Among respondents with more severe hearing loss, 30 percent of non-users of hearing aids reported these sad feelings, com-pared to 22 percent of hearing aid users. 

Another measure of emotional distress is the perception that “other people get angry at me for no reason,” which psychologists often identify as an indicator of paranoia. 

Older non-users were more likely to agree with the statement “people get angry with me usually for no reason” (14 percent of users vs. 23 percent of non-users). Among those with more severe hearing loss, the difference was even greater—14 percent for users vs. 36 percent for non-users. 

Because social isolation is a serious problem for some older people, the study also examined social behavior and found that people who don’t use hearing aids are considerably less likely to participate in social activities. Among respondents with more severe hearing loss, 42 percent of hearing aid users participate regularly in social activities com- pared to just 32 percent of non-users. –

Read more . . .

Rocky Run Middle School – CyberRams win grant to develop APP

July 17, 2014 in Community Events, Technology

 

Fairfax County Public Schools
Article Source

The Rocky Run Middle CyberRams team is one of four teams nationwide to win a STEM-in-Action grant from eCybermission, an educational outreach program of the U.S. Army focused on using science, technology, engineering, and math to solve a real problem in the community. 

Team members Ravi Dudhagra, Diego Gutierrez, Rishabh Krishnan, and Adityasai Koneru developed a computer program—Decibel mApp—to address the problem of noise-induced hearing loss that uses GPS technology to provide users with a map showing decibel levels the user experienced throughout the day. 

Team members worked with a local pediatric otolaryngologist, the U.S. Department of Energy, the National Institutes of Health, and computer programming engineers to develop the app.  The CyberRams won the grant, worth up to $5,000, because their plans were determined to provide the greatest possible impact in their community, and hopes to have the final product ready to go to market in a year.

 

Thanks to Patience Battisti

St. Peters, Missouri – Field of dreams for deaf players

July 17, 2014 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

KSDK.com
by Mike Bush

ST. PETERS, Mo. - It’s the time of year when the sounds of summer can be heard all over the country but not by the kids on these baseball fields in St. Peters, Missouri. This is the Mike Bush Fantasy Baseball Camp for the deaf and hard of hearing.

“We play baseball but it’s so much more than baseball,” explained Camp Director Cari Hampton.

Nine-year-old Harrison Beck is in his third year here.

“I’ve been hitting and catching. Practicing all my baseball skills,” he said by sign language.

Harrison discovered a love for sports when he was just a toddler about the same time doctors discovered that he was deaf. His dad says, the diagnosis was actually a blessing.

“Before we just knew we had a kid that wasn’t talking then we knew we had a deaf child,” said Dan Beck, Harrison’s dad.

Still, like most children his dad says he just wanted to fit in.

“It’s hard for a kid who can’t hear and talk like every other kid to join in a team sport,” he said.

That’s why, 25 years ago, this camp was started. For a week every summer, some 60 kids who often get singled out because of their disability get to standout because of their ability.

“I want them to feel, feel like they’re special and they’re important and they’re just as important as everyone else,” explained Hampton.

Read more . . .

Advocates for deaf, blind pressure Apple for more-accessible apps

July 17, 2014 in Hearing Loss & Deafness, Technology

 

 

Reuters
By 
Christina Farr
Monday July 14, 2014
Article Source

SAN FRANCISCO — Advocates for the blind are debating whether to use a carrot or a stick to persuade one of their oldest allies, Apple Inc, to close an emerging digital divide in mobile technology.

As digital life increasingly moves to the world of smartphones and tablets, some disabled people with visual, hearing and other impairments are feeling more left out than ever.

As baby boomers retire and age, the number of people needing help is multiplying. Many advocates for the disabled believe federal law requires that apps be accessible, but courts have not ruled on the issue. Few disabled want to risk alienating Apple, considered a friend, by fighting it.

Mobile apps that work well can transform a blind person’s life, reading email on the go or speaking directions to a new restaurant. Some young blind people no longer feel the need to learn Braille to read with their fingers, when Siri and other computer voices can do the reading instead. Captions on videos and special hearing aids bring hearing impaired into the digital fold.

But when apps don’t work, life can grind to a stop. Jonathan Lyens, a San Francisco city employee who is legally blind, has a hard time browsing for jobs on professional networking site LinkedIn.

“The app is insane. Buttons aren’t labeled. It’s difficult to navigate,” Lyens said. When it comes to social-media apps, new problems arise with every release, he said. “I get nervous every time I hit the update button.”

Read more . . .

Businesses welcome deaf as university turns 150

July 15, 2014 in Community News

 

 

USA Today
by Cogan Schneier July 12, 2014
Article Source

WASHINGTON — When Steve Walker was a student at Gallaudet University in the 1980s, he says, the school for the deaf and hard of hearing was a very different place than it is today.

When Walker studied at Gallaudet, students were advised not to venture outside the campus, because most people in the surrounding neighborhood didn’t speak sign language. Students didn’t feel welcome in the outside community, and struggled to communicate in restaurants where they couldn’t understand the servers. As the school celebrates its 150th anniversary, Walker says that has changed.

These days, the northeast Washington neighborhood around the school, including the upscale Union Market food hall next to the campus and the bars and restaurants of nearby H Street, accommodates the deaf community. Walker works at the school as a sign language interpreter for students who are both blind and deaf. He uses what’s called tactile interpreting, in which a student will hold his hands as he signs to understand him.

Walker says what is happening in the area around Gallaudet is a serious change in cultural sensitivity.

“Wow, there is a big shift in what I’ve seen,” Walker says, raising his eyebrows as he signs. “Back in the ’80s, when I was here, students basically did not feel welcome on H Street. But now, I see a lot of students, faculty and alumni going anywhere they want to go. And especially, it’s nice to see people on H Street using American Sign Language to be able to communicate with us, because that makes us feel even more welcome.”

Nearly 1,200 alumni registered for Gallaudet’s 150th anniversary celebration and reunion on campus this past week.

Gallaudet is a mecca for deaf students, says Wendy Martin, who graduated in 1980. Martin, who hails from Alberta, Canada, says she knows people from all over the world who came to Washington to study at Gallaudet. The university has about 1,000 undergraduate students and nearly 900 employees, half of whom are deaf or hard of hearing.

Fred Weiner, assistant vice president for administration at Gallaudet, says businesses have realized it makes much more sense, and money, to welcome the deaf community than to ignore it.

Read more . . .

 

Silver Spring player is deaf pitcher, MLB prospect

July 15, 2014 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

Gazette.net
By Eric Goldwein Staff Writer
Article Source

Gallaudet senior leads Thunderbolts staff with 1.27 ERA and three wins

Since his youth baseball days, Brandon Holsworth has always had help on the diamond.

This summer, as the ace of the Silver Spring Spring-Takoma Park Thunderbolts, he’s showing he might not need it.

Holsworth, a deaf pitcher from Gallaudet University, is dominating his competition in the Cal Ripken Collegiate Baseball League. The 6-foot-4, towering right-hander has a team-best three wins and 1.27 earned-run average, leading the Silver Spring pitching staff despite playing without college teammate and interpreter Danny O’Donnell for part of the summer.

“They say 87 percent of communication is not verbal, so we find ways around it, but he has such an outgoing and enthusiastic personality that it’s fun to catch him,” catcher Robert Lucido, Jr. said.

Holsworth, a rising senior at Gallaudet, is hoping his performance in the competitive college wood bat league can help him earn a spot in the Major League Baseball draft.

“I’m really doing everything I can to be the best I can during this season because this is the one opportunity before I go into my senior year,” Holsworth said through O’Donnell. “I don’t know if I’ll have another opportunity to face competition like this.”

Holsworth, who was born deaf, grew up playing baseball and basketball. Communication has been his biggest barrier athletically, his father Chris Holsworth said, but with assistance and support from family and teammates the talented right-hander has dealt with the challenges. In little league, his father would be in the dugout to help him communicate with teammates. In high school, he had a state-hired interpreter, as was required by law in Michigan. In college, he found a fit at Gallaudet, where his teammates and coach — former Major League Baseball player Curtis Pride — are fluent in American Sign Language.

Holsworth learned about the Thunderbolts through O’Donnell, a fully hearing teammate at Gallaudet last season, whose parents are deaf. O’Donnell, a pitcher, has acted as an interpreter for Holsworth during his meetings at the mound.

Read more  . . .

Read John Barrowman’s Deaf for the Day blog

July 15, 2014 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

Hearing Dogs for Deaf People
July8, 2014 by Sarah O’Brien
Article Source

Hi, I’m John Barrowman and I went Deaf for the Day for Hearing Dogs.
I hope you enjoy reading my diary from the day.

 

10.00 Sudden hearing loss

I arrived at Specsavers Hearing Centre in Edgware Road to meet the audiologist who would be making me deaf for the day – Mark

John getting the gel ear moulds inserted

John getting the gel ear moulds inserted

Edgar. I wasn’t feeling particularly nervous as I imagined it would be a fairly straightforward day. Nothing could have prepared me for just how challenging going deaf would be.

The ITV Good Morning Britain film crew began filming my experience as Mark inserted special gel moulds into my ears which gave me around 60% hearing loss. I could feel the difference immediately. It’s really hard to explain how a sudden hearing loss affects you, but I could no longer hear what Mark was saying to me. Straight away, I was lip reading everything he said.

10.30 Conversations

I was concentrating so hard on lip-reading one person at a time, that if someone else started speaking I just couldn’t keep up. A member of the film crew was standing beside me and apparently he asked me a question, I didn’t even register a sound. It soon dawned upon me that this experience was going to be much tougher than I had anticipated.

11.00 The silent streets of London

As I left Specsavers, I walked along Edgware Road and suddenly the world was closing in around me. I could no longer hear the sound of busy London traffic, the footsteps walking behind me, the buzz of conversation around me. I felt anxious crossing the road. All the sounds I take for granted had gone. I had entered into a world of silence.

Next, I hailed a cab to take me to my manager’s office. As I got out the taxi driver said something to me and I couldn’t hear what he said. It was too late to ask as he drove away. It’s strange the things you miss when one of your senses is taken away – like the tail end of a conversation. I wonder what he said to me…

11.30 Business as usual?

John and his manager Gavin try to communicate

John and his manager Gavin try to communicate

It was really difficult trying to have a conversation with Gavin as I had to concentrate intensely on watching his lips. Gavin kept telling me that my phone was ringing, I felt like I’d lost control.Next stop – a meeting at my manager Gavin’s office in central London. Gavin and the team knew I was going deaf for the day, and were intrigued to find out how it would affect me. I had to ring the intercom five times as I couldn’t hear a response. The first thing the team noticed was that I had been speaking really loudly. I was completely unaware of the volume of my own voice as I couldn’t hear it.

It was already so much harder than I ever thought it would be. I was tired. In fact, I was exhausted! Is this how deaf people feel every day?

12.30 Tired, frustrated and withdrawn

I could feel myself getting more and more frustrated as the day went on,  . . . .

Read more  and See Video. . .

 

World Cup fanatics report hearing woes

July 15, 2014 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

Taiwan News

By Jake Chung  /  Staff writer
Article Source

Since the FIFA World Cup quarter-finals began, there has been a 20 percent increase in people developing symptoms of sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL) or sudden deafness, from staying up late to watch the matches, a local newspaper reported.

The Chinese-language Apple Daily on Monday reported a case in which a 28-year-old woman had stayed up almost every night for two weeks to watch World Cup games. Despite developing a cold, the woman was not deterred from staying up to watch another game.

The report quoted the woman as saying: “The ceiling swam and I even fell down a couple of times” after watching the game, but she ignored the symptoms and returned home to sleep before work.

The woman overslept and decided to call in sick. However, upon calling her company to request a sick day, she realized that she could hear nothing in her left ear and went to see a doctor, the report said.

The paper quoted Ministry of Health and Welfare Taoyuan General Hospital’s Division of Otolaryngology doctor Chen Ching-chung (陳景中) as saying that the woman’s lack of sleep — she had averaged about five hours per day over two weeks — had greatly lowered her resistance to viral infections.

The temperature difference between air-conditioned buildings and the summer weather outside had caused her to catch a cold, which also affected the vestibular nerve in her inner ear, the report said.

The sudden sensorineural hearing loss made the woman feel dizzy, the newspaper said.

She was lucky to have sought medical help early and would recover her hearing with the help of medication, the paper said.

The report quoted Chen as saying that the number of people reporting similar problems had increased by at least 20 percent since the World Cup entered the quarter-final stage.

Read more  . . .

Restaurant for the deaf and hearing impaired opens in Toronto

July 15, 2014 in Community News, Employment, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

AFP Relax – Wed, Jul 9, 2014
Article Source

Toronto has become the latest international city to adopt a growing restaurant trend that aims to raise awareness of the hearing-impaired by hiring deaf servers.

After San Francisco, San Antonio, Paris and the Gaza Strip, the largest city in Canada will be home to Signs Restaurant in the heart of the downtown core, where customers will have to place their order using sign language.

For customers who are sign language illiterate, an ASL cheat sheet will be available to help them sign for their meal, reported The Toronto Star. The menu is described as contemporary blend of Canadian and international cuisine.

The idea for a deaf restaurant was born when owner Anjan Manikumar was a manager at a pizza restaurant where one of his regular customers was hearing-impaired and ordering was a game of “point, nod and serve,” says the Star.

The experience inspired Manikumar to learn American Sign Language in an effort to communicate with his customer, and eventually to open a restaurant that would bridge the hearing and non-hearing community.

If the philosophy sounds familiar, it’s because a similar restaurant concept was launched to help raise awareness on visual impairments.

Created by a blind pastor from Zurich, Jorge Spielmann hosted dinner parties where guests supped blindfolded, at first in a show of solidarity with their host but also to better understand what it was to be blind.

But guests noted that the experience also heightened their sense of smell and taste, leading to the creation of restaurants like Dining in the Dark in the US, O. Noir in Canada and Dans le Noir in Paris.

Likewise, Mozzeria in San Francisco employs deaf staff, as does Atfaluna in Gaza, a charity restaurant for children with hearing disabilities, and Café Signes in Paris.

Signs in Toronto opens July 16.

Article Source

The Sorry State of Closed Captioning

July 15, 2014 in Advocacy & Access, Captioning / Relay, Technology

Streaming video now must provide subtitles for the hearing impaired. There’s no guarantee of accuracy, though. One solution: crowdsourcing.

The Atlantic
    

Article Source 

Imagine sitting down to watch an episode of Game of Thrones—and hardly being able to understand anything. That’s the case for non-native English speakers or any of the 36 million deaf or hard-of-hearing Americans. HBO doesn’t expect its viewers to have a knowledge of High Valyrian; that’s why it takes care to offer subtitles to viewers understand exactly how Daenerys intends to free the slaves of Essos.

If only most online streaming companies took as much care in everyday captioning.

Machine translation is responsible for much of today’s closed-captioning and subtitling of broadcast and online streaming video. It can’t register sarcasm, context, or word emphasis. It can’t capture the cacophonous sounds of multiple voices speaking at once, essential for understand the voice of an angry crowd of protestors or a cheering crowd. It just types what it registers. Imagine watching classic baseball comedy Major League and only hearing the sound of one fan shouting from the stands. Or only hearing every other line of lightning-fast dialogue when watching reruns of the now-classic sitcom 30 Rock.

As of April 30, streaming video companies are now required to provide closed captioning. On all programming. There’s no doubt that we’re in a better place than we were even five years ago, when streaming video companies weren’t required to closed-caption any of its content.  But, there still is a long way to go in improving the accuracy of subtitles. Netflix and Amazon Prime users have bemoaned the quality of the streaming companies’ closed captions, citing nonsense words, transcription errors, and endless “fails.” These companies blame the studios for not wanting to pay for accurate translations but excuses aren’t flying with paying streaming video subscribers.\

Marlee Matlin, the Oscar-winning actress and longtime advocate for better closed captions for the deaf and hard of hearing, recently mentioned . . .

Read more  . . .

 

Hastings, MN – YMCA to provide interpreter for deaf couple

July 15, 2014 in Disability Law, Interpreting & Transliterating

 

 

StarTribune, Minneapolis, MN

Concession follows lawsuit filed over swim classes at Hastings YMCA.

The YMCA of the Greater Twin Cities has agreed to provide an American Sign Language interpreter for deaf parents Jacob and Calena Lingle so they can fully participate in their daughter Aria’s swim classes at the Hastings Y.

After trying to negotiate for a year, the Lingles and their daughter, now 2½, sued the YMCA earlier this month, alleging that its refusal to provide an adequate means for them to communicate violated state and federal laws.

A day after the lawsuit was filed June 12 in Hennepin County District Court, the Lingles received an e-mail from the Y saying an interpreter would be made available, but only for the first of the seven-session Seahorse classes.

The Lingles’ attorney, Rick Macpherson, of the Minnesota Disability Law Center, said Wednesday that he received an e-mail Monday from the Y’s attorney saying the organization had decided to provide an interpreter for all the classes.

While the lawsuit has not been settled, Macpherson said the Y proposed putting the litigation on hold while it develops a new policy and resolves the other issues in the case.

“The Lingles are fine with that arrangement,” Macpherson said. “The Y has said they plan to involve representatives from the deaf community in coming up with the policy.”

The Lingles will have a role in that and the policy must be acceptable to them before they decide to settle the lawsuit. Because the suit has been filed, a judge will have to approve a timetable for the negotiations, the attorney said. Those details have not been worked out yet.

“The clients are happy they will be able to participate in the rest of the classes,” Macpherson said. “They’re committed to doing whatever they can so that the policy is a good one and works for everybody. There are lots of ways to work out cost-effective ways of doing it.”

Jacob and Calena Lingle, 27 and 25 respectively, have been deaf since birth. Their daughter can hear; her first language was ASL.

The family vacations each year on Cass Lake in northern Minnesota and wanted Aria to be comfortable in the water so she could play with her 20 cousins.

Read more . . .

InnoCaption technology for phone calls at NVRC – TODAY 7/15/14

July 15, 2014 in Captioning / Relay, Technology

 

 

Come to NVRC and Check Out the New InnoCaption Technology!
 
Chuck Owen will be in Washington, DC Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday of this week.  Chuck is the CEO of InnoCaption, which has recently launched an innovative captioning app for smartphones. InnoCaption is revolutionizing how deaf and hard of hearing persons communicate by making it possible to use the smartphone as it was intended – accessible, convenient, and mobile. Through the use of its patented technology in conjunction with live stenographers, InnoCaption provides fast, easy, and accurate real-time captioning for individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing and want to use their own voice to talk, but need assistance to understand what is being said by the hearing person they are calling or responding to.
 
If you would like to learn more about this free, innovative captioning service,
Chuck will be at NVRC TODAY 7/15/2014 at 3:30 pm.