Newcastle University study links childhood infections to hearing loss in later life

October 21, 2014 in Hearing Loss & Deafness, Research

 

 

ChronicalLive.com, UK
Oct 20, 2014
By Helen Rae

Newcastle University research shows common childhood infections may lead to hearing loss later in life

Common childhood infections may lead to hearing loss in later life, a health study has revealed.

Ailments such as tonsillitis and ear infections can seriously damage a youngster’s hearing as they get older, Newcastle University research shows.

The findings are part of the ongoing 1947 Newcastle Thousand Families Study which monitored 1,142 Newcastle-born babies from 1947 to the present day, measuring their health, growth and development.

Now in their 60s a quarter of the “red spot” babies had their hearing tested and the results have been collated.

Dr Mark Pearce, who led the study at the Institute of Health and Society at Newcastle University, said: “Our findings show that those who suffered from infections as a child were more likely to have a hearing loss in their 60’s. Reducing childhood infection rates may help prevent hearing loss later in life.

“This study shows the importance of the Newcastle birth cohorts, with the study initially focusing on childhood infections. The study is nearly 70 years old and continues to make a major contribution to understanding health conditions, which is only possible through the continued contribution of cohort members.”

The children, born in May and June 1947, are known as red spot babies because of the way doctors marked their medical files. They have provided invaluable information for studies over the years.

Read More  . . .

Signed languages can do so many things spoken languages can’t

October 21, 2014 in Community News

 

 

Sarah Klenbort
theguardian.com, AU
Sunday 19 October 2014

The deaf community is no utopia, but it does offer an alternative language, culture and social life to those who choose to be a part of it

When people notice my daughter and me signing in the street, they often stop and comment: “You know,” they say, “there’s this thing called the cochlear implant.” As if the mother of a deaf child could’ve missed that news.

Or they offer some hopeful anecdote: “I met this deaf woman with hearing aids from Queensland when I was on holiday in Fiji and she’s a really good plumber – I mean really good.”

Because this week is National Week of Deaf People, I feel it’s a good time to talk about the nature of Auslan (Australian Sign Language) and the deaf community. I’ve only been studying Auslan for four years, but I’ve come a long way from that first community course.

You see, I used to be one of you, one of those people who thought sign language followed English grammar. And I thought there was just one sign language – the same in every country – though if I’d thought that through for more than a minute I would’ve realised those two assumptions were mutually exclusive.

I also used to assume all deaf people would prefer to be hearing.

The deaf community is no utopia, but it does offer an alternative language, culture and social life to those who choose to be a part of it. In fact, signed languages can do many things spoken languages can’t. In fact, here’s a list of ways in which visual languages are superior to the spoken word:

Read More  . . .

 

Deaf West Hosts Memorial for Phyllis Frelich at the Mark Taper Forum

October 21, 2014 in Community Events

 

 

BroadwayWorld.comphyllisFrelich
By BWW News Desk

October 20
Deaf West Theatre hosts a memorial to celebrate the life and career of Tony Award-winning actress and deaf activist Phyllis Frelich tonight, Oct. 20 at 8 p.m. at the Mark Taper Forum. Ms. Frelich, who was deaf, passed away from progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) in April. She was 70.

“Phyllis was a beloved figure within the deaf community, and it felt appropriate that we host a service,” said Deaf West Theatre artistic director David J. Kurs. “She starred in our inaugural production of The Gin Game in 1990 and figured in our productions numerous times over the years. In addition to her many starring roles, she directed, taught acting, and was for many years an activist for equal access for all deaf performers.”

Ms. Frelich is perhaps best remembered for her groundbreaking role as a deaf woman in a relationship with a hearing man in Children of a Lesser God by Mark Medoff. Inspired by Ms. Frelich’s real-life marriage to scenic designer Robert Steinberg, the play received the 1980 Tony Award for Best Play, and Ms. Frelich and co-star John Rubinsteincaptured Tonys for Best Actress and Best Actor respectively.

Deaf and blind able to shop alone at non-profit grocery store

October 21, 2014 in Community News

 

 

Braille signs and audio scanner help visually impaired shop for groceries independently

By Jesara Sinclair, CBC News
Oct 16, 2014

A non-profit food store in Vancouver’s east end has introduced Braille signs and audio scanners to allow deaf-blind and other visually impaired customers to shop independently.

The grocery markets operated by the Quest Food Exchange aren’t open to the public.Instead low-income clients are referred through a social services agency.

The project started when Paralympic athlete Eddy Morten lost his job and became a customer at the food market. Morten is deaf and blind.

“When we started talking to him, Eddie was unable to go shopping on his own, and an interpreter would cost him $50 for one hour and he would need to book two hours,” marketing manager Pardeep Khrod told CBC Radio’s On The Coast.

Morten was brought on as the project coordinator. Khrod says he helped staff understand the challenges of navigating a grocery store when both deaf and blind.

Read More . . .

Conference Brings Over a Hundred Interpreters for the Deaf in Rochester, MN

October 21, 2014 in Community News

 

 

KAAL-TV
By: Meghan Reistad

(ABC 6 News) — The Minnesota Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf meets once a year, and this year, they are meeting Rochester.

“Sometimes our work is really isolating and we’re out in our little world doing our thing and MRID gives us an opportunity to get together reconnect and energize,” said Paula Gajewski Mickelson.

The conference brings interpreters from all over Minnesota and surrounding states.

“Basically this is a conference for interpreters from across the state of Minnesota as well as Iowa, Wisconsin, South Dakota,” said Conference Chair Michael Provancha.

About 130 interpreters are learning together, some new to the field and others coming with years of experience.

“I have to say I’m terribly proud of all of the students that we have here at the conference… It’s really exciting to see a new generation coming forward in this field,” said Gajewski Mickelson.

Together, they’ll spend the weekend taking classes to improve their skills at their jobs.

Watch Caption Video  Read More  . . .

PAH Workshop at Circle of Support Conference – Saturday, November 8th

October 17, 2014 in Community Events, Families

 
PAH will be providing a workshop at the Circle of Support Conference sponsored by the ARC of Greater Prince William on Saturday, November 8th.

The Circle of Support Conference is for families of those with special needs and the professionals that work with them. PAH’s presentation is titled, “A Survival Guide for Parents of Children that are Deaf, Hard of Hearing, or Deaf-Blind.” Other sessions at the conference focus on Medicaid waivers, behavioral interventions, and advocacy.

The conference is from 8 am – 3 pm with registration due by October 31st and will be held at Hylton High School near Woodbridge, VA. Learn more about Circle of Support and register online at: http://arcgpw.org/event-view/the-20th-circle-of-support-conference/

Saturday, November 8th.
8 am – 3 pm
registration due by October 31st

Hylton High School
14051 Spriggs Rd
Woodbridge VA 22193

 

 

All Things Housing Workshop – Thursday, November 6

October 17, 2014 in Community News

 
(Thanks to Fairfax County Disability Services)

Thursday, November 6
7-9 p.m.
JCCNV – 8900 Little River Turnpike, Fairfax VA 22031

The Jewish Community Center of Northern Virginia (JCCNV) and The Washington Group Special Care Planning Team invite you to join them for a workshop on housing for individuals with disabilities. This workshop will showcase working housing models, residential ideas, and supports for individuals with disabilities.  There will also be a housing-focused resource fair.  This workshop is open to all for free.  Please RSVP to Carey Alford by Tuesday, November 4 at 703-865-6502 or calford@financialguide.com.

 

 

 

EXCEL! Employment Networking Group for People with Disabilities – October 23

October 17, 2014 in Community Events, Employment

 

 

(Thanks to Fairfax County Disability Services)

Are you a person with a disability looking for a job? Join the ENDependence Center of Northern Virginia’s EXCEL! Networking Group on October 23, 2014, from 1 p.m. – 3 p.m. to take the fear out of networking and learn important skills to get hired.

The group will meet at the ENDependence Center of Northern Virginia, 2300 Clarendon Blvd., Suite 305, Arlington, VA 22201.

RSVP to EXCEL@ecnv.org or 703-525-3268.

 

 

 

November 8th- NVAD General and Election Meeting 2014

October 16, 2014 in Community Events

(Open to Public)

Saturday – November 8, 2014

Breakfast Buffet: 8:30AM to 10:00AM
General Meeting: 10:00AM to 12:00PM

Download Nov. NVAD_General Election 2014 Flyer

NVAD website

Reuben I. Altizer Meeting Room
Northern Virginia Resource Center (NVRC)
3951 Pender Drive, Suite 130 Fairfax, VA 22030

Breakfast (eggs, sausages, bacon, pancakes, etc.) will be served. RSVP by Saturday, November 1, 2014 to Jeanne Lavelle (jalavelle17@gmail.com) or Donna Kay Graff (VP 571-766-0671). Donation is greatly appreciated.

For more information, contact President Jill Moebus, jmoebus7@gmail.com / VP (757) 892-0324

CALL FOR NOMINATIONS

You may nominate a NVAD member or yourself.

A candidate must be member of NVAD for one year.
PRESIDENT; VICE-PRESIDENT; SECRETARY; TREASURER; BOARD-AT-LARGE (3)

For more information re: nominations, please contact
Pat Beech, pgbeech@aol.com
Nominations will be announced at the
NVAD General Meeting / Election on Saturday, November 8, 2014.

Download Nov. NVAD_General Election 2014 Flyer

 

 

Vodafone Firsts helps deaf girl experience live music

October 16, 2014 in Community News, Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

Vodafone Firsts, the programme that enables people to do remarkable things for the first time with the help of mobile technology, has helped a 19-year-old deaf Dutch girl experience a music concert for the first time.

Vera van Dijk, a 19-year-old Dutch girl who was born deaf and has never been to a concert, is preparing for one of the most exciting moments of her life following a cochlear implant that allows her to hear certain sounds.

Vera started to hear a small number of musical notes when she received the implant two years ago. Because she had limited awareness of the type of music she may like, she accessed social media channels on her smartphone to ask the Dutch public to help Kyteman choose the first song that she would be able to hear perfectly.

To ensure that the sounds are audible to Vera, her #FirstConcert is being composed from scratch using the limited combination of frequencies that the cochlear implant enables her to hear. It is being composed by Kyteman, one of the most popular progressive musicians in the Netherlands, who has worked with Sting and other leading artists.

Watch Video – See more at: http://www.entertainment-focus.com/technology-section/technology-news/vodafone-firsts-helps-deaf-girl-experience-live-music/#sthash.koePlM1o.dpuf

 

 

Tulsa Police Work To Improve Communication With Deaf Community

October 16, 2014 in Community News

 

Oklahoma’s Own , NEWS ON 6
TESS MAUNE
Oct 14, 2014

TULSA, Oklahoma – A town hall meeting Tuesday night focused on taking the fear out of a scary situation. Neither police nor citizens know exactly what to expect when someone’s pulled over, but that anxiety is compounded when a driver is deaf or hard of hearing. The issue came into stark focus after a deaf man was shot and killed last month in Florida, when he didn’t respond to deputies telling him to drop his gun. While Florida may seem far from here, it hits close to home for the deaf and hard of hearing in Oklahoma. A traffic stop is a situation no one ever wants to be in, but it happens. A reenactment shows a traffic stop from an officer’s perspective, but also gives the driver’s point of view. In this case, the man behind to wheel is deaf. It’s a situation Papa Rodgers Cameron said he knows all-too-well. “I get stopped a lot. I travel an awful lot on a motorcycle,” he said. Cameron speaks well, but he can’t hear. “I’m very, very, difficult to communicate with,” he said. Communication was the focus of a town hall meeting for the deaf and hard of hearing Tuesday night; whether it’s during a traffic stop, fire or 911 call.

Not all deaf people speak or read lips, but almost all communicate with their hands.

Read more of this article  . . .

10/14/2014 Related Story: Traffic Stops For Hearing Impaired Drivers: Practical Tips For Public Safety

 

 

Transcense: New APP in Development to provide transcribed conversations

October 16, 2014 in Captioning / Relay, Community News, Technology

Transcense can translate speech into written words and transcribe it on screen in near real time. To make that possible, the app connects to several phones and activates their mics to capture what everyone’s saying, then it uses voice recognition to assign each person in the group a color for their speech bubbles. Also, the user can ask the program to speak for him using a digital voice or get everyone’s attention through the app when he wants to say something.

Walk4Hearing – October 25 – Come Join Us!

October 16, 2014 in Community Events

 
hlaa_WalkLogo2

Please join NVRC for the 2014 Walk4Hearing event to be held on October 25 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.  Sponsored by the Hearing Loss Association of America (HLAA), the Walk4Hearing is the largest walk for hearing loss in the country.  Thousands of walkers in events held across the country come together to raise awareness about hearing loss and to raise funds for programs and services.

NVRC is once again sponsoring a team of walkers, “Team NVRC.”  This is an invitation to join the team and walk with us or to support the team with a donation.  HLAA has once again pledged to donate a portion of the money that Team NVRC raises back to NVRC for its programs and services.  

Schedule: 
9am – Registration/Check-in
10am – Walk begins
Distance: 5K (3.1 miles)

Go to www.walk4hearing.org to register and join Team NVRC.  Click on “Register” in the upper right hand corner of the page.  If you cannot join us this year, please consider a tax deductible donation to help Team NVRC reach (and hopefully exceed) its goal of $500 for this year’s walk.  Click on “Donate,” then “search” for Team NVRC, and choose a walker to support with your much appreciated donation.

Remember, a portion of all funds raised goes directly to NVRC for program support.

 

 

The hearing aid for SPIES – Clip-on amplifier eavesdrops on conversations

October 14, 2014 in Community News

 

 

By SARAH GRIFFITHS FOR MAILONLINElalalala
October 13, 2014 – UK
Article

The hearing aid for SPIES: Clip-on amplifier eavesdrops on conversations and even translates foreign languages in real time

Think how much easier life would be if, in a crowded and noisy bar, you could tune in to what your friend is saying on the other side of a room and block out all other conversations.

This is what one designer is suggesting might be possible in just a year or two – and it could come in especially handy for spies operating in crowded public places. Mark Rolston of Argodesign, California, thinks we will one day be able to wear devices that give us ‘superpowers’ such as ultra-directional hearing, incredible motor skills and anonymity when we want it. He came up with a concept called LaLaLa, which looks like a futuristic hearing aid.  ‘LaLaLa would allow you to hear life as you intend it, though selective hearing, sound filtering, voice modification and more,’ Renae Alsobrook, operations manager at the firm told MailOnline.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2788297/the-hearing-aid-spies-clip-amplifier-eavesdrops-conversations-translates-foreign-languages-real-time.html#ixzz3G9C9LxGK

 

 

5 Bad Habits of Hearing Loss (People)

October 14, 2014 in Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

By 

Legend has it that from the time they first suspect a hearing problem, people typically wait 7 to 10 years before actually doing something about it. That’s a decade—a tenth of a century—of deteriorating communication. Seven to 10 years, wasted!

Research shows many reasons why people delay, including a belief their hearing is not all that bad and they can live with it, that it would cost too much to treat, hearing loss is low on their list of health priorities, or they simply don’t know where to get help. (AARP/American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA): National Poll on Hearing Health, 2011)

But unaddressed hearing loss has side effects. Years of poor communication take a toll on self-esteem, relationships, and overall health. It also gives a person time to develop bad habits. Sam Trychin, the renowned psychologist, public speaker and writer on hearing loss issues, wrote in his Mental Health Practitioner’s Guide (1987):  “The majority of people who are hard of hearing have had a gradual loss over a number of years. For them there may not have been a distinctly recognizable crisis period, but they have had a long time in which to develop and strengthen a variety of bad habits, such as bluffing, which can be highly resistant to change.”

So, what are some of these bad habits?

Read more . . .