Proposal to Downsize Texas School for Deaf Stirs Anger

February 12, 2015 in Community News

 

 

KUT News – The Texas Tribune
by Ben Philpott
Feb. 11, 2015

Editor’s note: This story is from KUT.

The Texas School for the Deaf sits on 67 acres in between South 1st and South Congress. It looks more like a small college campus than a traditional school building. But then again, says school superintendent Claire Bugen, this isn’t a traditional school.

“We serve students from age zero, in our parent/infant program, through home visits. And then when the student is 18 months old, they start to come on campus for part-time services. Now these are local students. All the way through age 22. So our continuum of services is very broad,” Bugen says.

And their services extend far beyond the campus and local students.

If a school district has a deaf student, and they’re trying to figure out how to create an educational program, TSD can help out.

“This school means literally the world,” says TSD alum Donna Valverde-Hummel.

“Schools like ours have taken on a role of serving the entire state, families, parents, local school districts, through our outreach services,” Bugen says.

She says the school is no longer the asylum it was built to be back in the late 1800s. But even with innovations like online classes, and local districts simply making an effort to accommodate deaf students, the school is home to more than 500 students, with about half of them living on campus.

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