Women Who Eat Fish Twice Weekly Cut Their Risk Of Hearing Loss

September 17, 2014 in Hearing Loss & Deafness

 

 

Are you finding it tougher to follow conversations in a noisy restaurant? Or does it seem like people are mumbling when you speak with them?

These are two questions commonly used to screen for hearing loss, which affects more than one-third of people over age 65, according to the National Institutes of Health.

So, what to do to cut the risk?

Women who eat fish regularly have a lower risk of developing hearing loss compared to women who rarely or never eat fish, according to a study published Wednesday in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Women who ate two or more servings of fish per week had a 20 percent lower risk of hearing loss, according to Dr. Sharon Curhan, a researcher at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and co-author of the study.

And though she and her colleagues had a hunch that certain types of fish may be more protective than others, it didn’t turn out that way. “Eating any type of fish — whether it’s tuna, dark fish [like salmon] or light fish was a associated with a lower risk,” Curhan told Shots.

Read More  . . .